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Educatio 



Fairfield University 
Course Catalog 



2001-2002 





Applications and Information 

For applications and additional information, please write or call: 

School of Continuing Education 

Dolan Campus 
Fairfield University 
1073 North Benson Road 
Fairfield, CT 06430-5195 
Telephone: (203) 254-4000 x4220 
Fax: (203)254-4106 
E-Mail: CONED@Fair1.Fairfield.Edu 
Web site: http://www.fairfield.edu 

The provisions of this bulletin are not an irrevocable contract between Fairfield University and the student. The University reserves 
the right to change any provision or any requirement at any time. 

Fairfield University admits students of any sex, race, color, marital status, sexual orientation, religion, age, national origin or 
ancestry, disability or handicap to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students 
of the University. It does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, marital status, sexual orientation, religion, age, national 
origin or ancestry, disability or handicap in administration of its educational policies, admission policies, employment policies, 
scholarship and loan programs, athletic programs or other University-administered programs. 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES — It is Fairfield University's policy that no qualified disabled student shall, on the basis of 
disability, be discriminated against, excluded from participation in, or denied the benefits of any academic program, activities, or 
services. The University provides support services and arranges reasonable accommodations for disabled students. However, the 
University will not alter the essential academic elements of courses or programs. Students who require support services or other 
accommodations should contact the Director of Student Support Services, Dolan 210. Arrangements for appropriate accommo- 
dations may be made in a cooperative effort between the student, the faculty member, and student support services. The University 
may require documentation of learning disability. 

Fairfield University complies with the "Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act." 
This report contains a summary of Fairfield University Security Department's policies and procedures along with crime statistics 
as required. Anyone wanting a copy of the report may obtain one by contacting Fairfield's Security Department at (203) 254- 
4090, or by stopping at the office in Loyola Hall, Room 2. The office is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. 

The Title II Higher Education Reauthorization Act Report is available online at www.fairfield.edu/academic/gradedu/acadinfo.htm 



SCHOOL 

OF 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 

2001-2002 



Directory 



TELEPHONE NUMBERS 



SCHOOL OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 

General Information (203) 254-4220 or (888) 254-1566 

Phone Registration (203) 254-4220 or (888) 254-1566 

Academic Advising, Career Counseling (203) 254-4220 

Leadership Center (203) 254-4170 

Study Abroad (203) 254-4220 



FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY 

Dial (203) 254-4000 and ask for extension: 

Bursar -Student Accounts 2410 

Student Services 2443 



DIRECT LINES 

Bookstore 254-4262 

Campus Ministry 254-4050 

Financial Aid 254-4125 

Graduate School of Education 254-4250 

The Leadership Center 254-4170 

Library 254-4044 

Computer Graphics Institute 254-4220 

Recreational Complex 254-4140 

School of Business, Charles F. Dolan 254-4070 

School of Engineering 254-4147 

School of Nursing 254-4150 

Security/ Parking Information 254-4090 

Student ID Cards (Bannow G34) 254-4009 

University Registrar 254-4288 

Online Advising afsceadvise@mail.fairfield.edu 



Table of Contents 



Table of Contents 



The University 5 

The Mission of Fairfield University 6 

Accreditation 7 

A Message to Students 8 

General Information 10 

Academic Policies and Procedures 17 

School of Continuing Education 19 

Associates in Arts Degree 25 

Bachelor of Professional Studies 26 

Continuing Education Courses 28 

Arts and Sciences 29 

Business 91 

Nursing 111 

Study Abroad 121 

Professional & Personal Development 125 

Faculty 131 

Administration 142 



Fairfield University 



The University 

Fairfield University, founded in 1 942, became the 26th 
institution of higher learning operated by the Jesuit 
Order in the United States — the inheritor of a tradition 
of learning and scholarship that dates back to 1540, 
when St. Ignatius Loyola founded the Society of Jesus 
on the principle of active service in the world. 

Many Jesuits chose education as their field of service. 
A basic Jesuit principle, the striving for excellence, led 
them to create schools that have become renowned 
for their academic quality. Over the centuries, a Jesuit 
education has come to mean a high standard of 
academic and intellectual discipline within Judeo- 
Christian values. 

The majority of Fairfield's faculty are lay people who 
represent many faiths and many creeds, and students 
are selected without regard to sex, race, color, marital 
status, religion, age, national origin or ancestry, dis- 
ability or handicap. There is one common tie — a 
commitment to moral and spiritual values. This is the 
cornerstone of Fairfield's academic philosophy — the 
search for truth through learning. 

Fairfield University consists of the College of Arts and 
Sciences, the Charles F. Dolan School of Business, 
the School of Nursing, the Graduate School of Educa- 
tion and Allied Professions, the School of Continuing 
Education, and the School of Engineering. 

The School of Continuing Education is located in the 
Dolan House, which is in the north end of the campus. 

Fairfield's 200-acre campus is among the most 
beautiful in the country. Created from two large private 
estates, it retains a gracious, tranquil atmosphere. 
There are many wooded areas, lawns, gardens and 
pleasant walks, and, from several vantage points, a 
broad view of the blue waters of Long Island Sound. 



General Education Core Curriculum 

The goal of a Fairfield education is to develop the 
whole person: an intellectual being who can think 
clearly, accurately, dispassionately; a social being 
who cares about others and takes one's place in the 
world with them; a physical being who knows the laws, 
limitations, and beauty of the natural world; a spiritual 
being who seeks to make one's life express the truths 
of religion and philosophy. 




Because Fairfield believes that a liberal education can 
achieve this goal, the University has developed a 
general education core curriculum that all undergradu- 
ates must take to acquire a broad background in all 
academic areas. No matter whatthe student's majoror 
field of specialization, during the years at Fairfield he 
or she will take from two to five courses in each of five 
areas. 

Within the framework of these five areas, each student 
has a number of options so that fulfilling the require- 
ment can become a stimulating and enjoyable experi- 
ence while providing the breadth of knowledge neces- 
sary for further studies, and for life as a well-educated 
human being. 



University Mission 

The Mission of 
Fairfield University 

Fairfield University, founded by the Society of Jesus, is 
a co-educational institution of higher learning whose 
primary objectives are to develop the creative intellectual 
potential of its students and to foster in them ethical and 
religious values and a sense of social responsibility. 
Jesuit education, which began in 1547, is committed 
today to the service of faith, of which the promotion of 
justice is an absolute requirement. 

Fairfield is Catholic in both tradition and spirit. It 
celebrates the God-given dignity of every human person. 
As a Catholic university it welcomes those of all beliefs 
and traditions who share its concerns for scholarship, 
justice, truth, and freedom, and it values the diversity 
which their membership brings to the university 
community. 

Fairfield educates its students through a variety of 
scholarly and professional disciplines. All of its schools 
share a liberal and humanistic perspective and a 
commitment to excellence. Fairfield encourages a 
respect for all the disciplines— their similarities, their 
differences, and their interrelationships. In particular, in 
its undergraduate schools it provides all students with a 
broadly based general education curriculum with a 
special emphasis on the traditional humanities as a 
complement to the more specialized preparation in 
disciplines and professions provided by the major 
programs. Fairfield is also committed to the needs of 
society for liberally educated professionals. It meets the 
needs of its students to assume positions in this society 
through its undergraduate and graduate professional 
schools and programs. 

A Fairfield education is a liberal education, characterized 
by its breadth and depth. It offers opportunities for 
individual and common reflection, and it provides training 
in such essential human skills as analysis, synthesis, 
and communication. The liberally educated person is 
able to assimilate and organize facts, to evaluate 
knowledge, to identify issues, to use appropriate 
methods of reasoning, and to convey conclusions 
persuasively in written and spoken word. Equally 
essential to liberal education is the development of the 
aesthetic dimension of human nature, the power to 
imagine, to intuit, to create, and to appreciate. In its 
fullest sense liberal education initiates students at a 
mature level into theirculture— past, present, and future. 



Fairfield recognizes that learning is a lifelong process 
and sees the education that it provides as a foundation 
upon which its students may continue to build within 
their chosen areas of scholarly study or professional 
development. It also seeks to foster in its students a 
continuing intellectual curiosity and a desire for self- 
education that will extend to the broad range of areas to 
which they have been introduced in their studies. 

As a community of scholars, Fairfield gladly joins in the 
broader task of expanding human knowledge and 
deepening human understanding, and to this end it 
encourages and supports the scholarly research and 
artistic production of its faculty and students. 

Fairfield has a further obligation to the wider community 
of which it is a part, to share with its neighbors its 
resources and its special expertise for the betterment of 
the community as a whole. Faculty and students are 
encouraged to participate in the larger community 
through service and academic activities. But most of all, 
Fairfield serves the wider community by educating its 
students to be socially aware and morally responsible 
persons. 

Fairfield University values each of its students as an 
individual with unique abilities and potentials, and it 
respects the personal and academic freedom of all its 
members. At the same time it seeks to develop a greater 
sense of community within itself, a sense that all of its 
members belong to and are involved in the University, 
sharing common goals and a common commitment to 
truth and justice, and manifesting in their lives the 
common concern for all others that is the obligation of 
all educated, mature human beings. 

Accredited by the New England Association of Schools 
and Colleges, the University today offers complete 
programs of study in several schools: the College of 
Arts and Sciences, the Charles F. Dolan School of 
Business, the School of Nursing, the School of 
Continuing Education, the Graduate School of Education 
and Allied Professions, and the School of Engineering. 
Fairfield University offers men and women the 
advantages of a liberal education in a university 
atmosphere, and flexible programs that can make 
learning a personal experience. 

Fairfield University admits students of any sex, race, 
color, marital status, sexual orientation, religion, age, 
national origin or ancestry, disability or handicap to all 
the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally 
accorded or made available to students. 



Accreditation 



7 



Accreditation 



Fairfield University is fully accredited by the New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges, which 
accredits schools and colleges in the six New England 
States. Accreditation by one of the six regional accred- 
iting associations in the United States indicates that 
the school or college has been carefully evaluated and 
found to meet standards agreed upon by qualified 
educators. 

The University holds memberships and/or is accred- 
ited/approved by the National Association of Indepen- 
dent Colleges and Universities, American Council for 
Higher Education, American Assembly of Collegiate 
Schools of Business, the AACSB —The Association to 
Advance Colleges for Teacher Education, American 
Council on Education, The Association of Continuing 
Higher Education, Association of Jesuit Colleges and 
Universities, The Commission on Accreditation of Mar- 
riage and Family Therapy Education of the American 
Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT), 
and is also recognized by CORPA, Connecticut 
Association of Colleges and Universities for Teacher 
Education, Connecticut Conference of Independent 
Colleges, Connecticut Department of Higher Educa- 
tion, Jesuit Net, The Council for Accreditation of Coun- 
seling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), 
The Council on Recognition of Postsecondary Ac- 
creditation (CORPA), National Catholic Educational 
Association, National League for Nursing, and New 
England Business and Economic Association. 

Fairfield University complies with the Family Educa- 
tional Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (also known as 
the Buckley Amendment) that defines the rights and 
protects the privacy of students with regard to their 
educational records. 



Catalog 



The School of Continuing Education Catalog provides 
you with a wide array of information on credit and non- 
credit courses, certificate programs, on-line courses 
and Study Abroad opportunities. For a detailed 
schedule of specific courses offered by SCE, please 
see the course schedule published 3 times per year. 
Credit courses listed are offered through the School of 
Continuing Education. 




The non-credit section includes the certificate 
program in professional development and business 
certificate programs. 

The School of Continuing Education office of Study 
Abroad, in conjunction with Study Abroad Committee, 
plans and coordinates Study Abroad programs for part 
time and full time students. Several of the short term 
programs provide viable opportunities for the School 
of Continuing Education student to participate in an 
international learning experience. 



Class Schedule 

The School of Continuing Education courses are 
offered primarily in the evenings and weekends. SCE 
students may take day courses on a space available 
basis. Please note that some majors are offered only 
in the daytime. 



Mission Statement 

The School of Continuing Education fulfills Fairfield 
University's commitment to lifelong learning by 
providing a flexible and diverse curriculum for learners 
of all ages. The School uses the resources of a 
distinguished academic community to offer quality 
education that reflects the Jesuit tradition of scholar- 
ship, social justice and ethics. 



O A Message to Students 

A Message to Students 



Lifetime learning has become a way of life. It is 
important at any age to stay connected to learning 
resources. Today's world mandates that we stay current 
on new technologies and information. Blunkett, in Age 
of Learning (1998), explains, 

We are in a new age - the age of information and 
global competition. We have no choice but to 
prepare for this new age in which the key to 
success will be continuous education and the 
development of the human mind and imagination. 

Successful adults have embraced the concept of 
learning for life. They understand the power of learning 
through life. Learning provides opportunities for personal 
growth and career advancement. Learning gives you the 
ability to develop a wider range of interests and creative 
abilities. Learning helps you to acquire new skills and 
shape your future. 

Fairfield University's School of Continuing Education provides you with a variety of flexible learning 
options. The School offers the unique blend of a top-rated faculty who are experts in their fields 
and who care about students. Our support counselors work closely with you to help you. 

Whether you need to earn a degree or certificate, or have a desire to further your learning, the 
School of Continuing Education can help you make the connection. For those of you who are 
considering returning to school and are unsure of where to begin, we have programs and services 
that will help you decide. If you want to be the best, then choose the best for your education. 

You are invited to visit our campus where you will experience a wonderful sense of the energy, 
high quality standards and caring atmosphere, the perfect combination for a successful learning 
journey. 

I look forward to meeting you and getting to know you. If you have questions or comments, please 
contact my office to arrange a meeting or send me an email at ewilson@mail.fairfield.edu, or 
contact our on-line advising service at sceadvise@mail.fairfield.edu . We are here for you. 




Enda Farace Wilson, Ed.D. 
Dean 



SCHOOL 

OF 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 

2001-2002 



I U School of Continuing Education 

General Information 



Office Hours 

Monday - Thursday 8:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m. 

Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Saturday 8:30 a.m. -11:30 a.m. 

Weekend and summer hours may vary. 



Registration 

• You are encouraged to meet with an academic 
counselor before registering. 

Note: If you are planning to take 12 credits or 
more, you must meet with an academic 
counselor prior to registration. 

• If you are interested in taking classes, but not 
interested in applying for admission to Fairfield 
University, you may do so by completing the 
registration form and submitting it with your 
payment. 

• Students from other colleges and universities who 
wish to transfer credits from Fairfield University 
should obtain prior written approval from those 
institutions. 

• You may register directly with materials in the 
catalog, by fax (203) 254-4106, or by telephone 
(203) 254-4220 with a major credit card. 

• If you are pursuing a degree at Fairfield University, 
you must consult with a counselor about your 
program of study. 

• Those who wish to pursue a degree part-time, or 
non-credit certificate, should consult the relevant 
program section of this catalog. 

• Registered nurses who intend to enroll in the 
B.S.N, program must notify the School of Nursing, 
(203)254-4150. 



Student ID 

Students should obtain the new OneCard ID from the 
ground floor of Bannow. 

• The ID card allows you access to a variety of 
University systems and services. 

• It is your University library card. 



General Information 

• The regular hours for the OneCard office are 
9 a.m. - 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. The office 
is open until 7 p.m. on Tuesday evenings. 

• For more information call 254-4009. 



T\iition and Fees 

The Trustees of the University reserve the right to 
change tuition rates and make additional changes 
whenever necessary. 

Undergraduate tuition, per credit hour 

1 -1 1 credits (e.g. 3 credits, $990.00) $330.00 

12 or more credits $615.00 

Tuition, non-credit courses variable 

Registration fee (not refundable) 

Credit $25.00 

Non-credit/audit no registration fee 

Laboratory or materials fee variable 

Change of course or section fee $10.00 

Certificate fee $15.00 

Matriculation fee $50.00 

Promissory Note fee $25.00 

Graduation fee $100.00 

Transcript fee $4.00 

Returned check fee $20.00 

Audit fee, three-credit course $495.00 

Late charge $25.00 

• Full payment of tuition and fees, or authorization for 
billing a company or social service agency, must 
accompany registration. See "Reimbursement by 
Employer." 

• The tuition for each non-credit course and any 
additional fee is shown under the course listing. 

• With proper identification, a 25% discount in the 
tuition for all credit courses, (except tours and 
trips), is offered to citizens 62 years of age or older, 
the clergy, and members of religious orders. 

• Payment may be made by check, money order, 
MasterCard, VISA or American Express. 

• Make checks payable to Fairfield University. 

• Tuition and fees are payable in full at the time of 
registration. 



General Information 
Deferred Payment 

Deferred payment plans are available to students who 
take credit or non-credit courses. Those taking one 
and two-day programs are not eligible for these plans. 
Students must register in person and sign a promissory 
note. All notes are subject to the approval of the Office 
of the Bursar. Two plans are available. Students taking 
six or more credits pay one-fourth tuition plus all fees, 
including a $25 processing fee at the time of registration. 
The balance is paid in three installments due for the 
Fall Semester on September 30, October 30, and 
November 30, and for the Spring Semester on January 
30, February 28 and March 30. Students taking less 
than six credits or non-credit courses must pay one- 
half tuition plus fees upon registering. The balance is 
due for Fall on September 30 and for Spring on 
January 30. Students will not be invoiced. The copy of 
the promissory note is their statement. Failure to honor 
terms of the note will prevent future deferred payments 
and affect future registrations. 



Reimbursement by Employer 

• If you are eligible for company reimbursement, you 
must register in person, sign a promissory note and 
submit an original letter on company letterhead 
with the current date, your name and the company's 
commitment to pay for your charges or a portion 
thereof for the given semester. 

• All notes are subject to the approval of the Office of 
the Bursar. 

• Even if covered by reimbursement, all fees 
(registration, processing, lab or material) are 
payable at the time of registration. 

• A guarantee of payment must be secured at the 
time of registration by MasterCard, VISA, or 
American Express. 

• If the company offers less than 1 00% reimbursement 
unconditionally, you must pay the difference upon 
registration and sign a promissory note for the 
balance. 

• Letters are accepted on a per semester basis. 

• You must retain your registration receipt as proof of 
payment. 

• Your grade report is proof of completion. 

• Failure to pay before the next registration period 
will prevent future deferred payments and affect 
future registrations. 



School of Continuing Education 
Veterans 



11 



Veterans may apply educational benefits to degree 
studies at Fairfield University. They should submit 
theirfilenumberto the Registrar's Office; this office will 
complete certification forms. 

When registering, please be sure to complete the 
space on the registration form marked VA File 
Number. Veterans will pay tuition and fees to Fairfield 
University at time of registration and will be reimbursed 
by the Veterans' Administration. 



Refunds 

Refunds of tuition are calculated on the following 
schedule according to the postmarked date. Regularly 
scheduled courses: 

14-15 week courses: 

100% before 1 s ' scheduled class 

90% before 2 na scheduled class 

80% before 3 rd scheduled class 

60% before 4 th scheduled class 

40% before 5 :h scheduled class 

20% before 6 T scheduled class 

0% after 6 th scheduled class 

10-12 week courses and ASAP courses: 

100% before 1* scheduled class 

80% before 2° scheduled class 

60% before 3 r scheduled class 

40% before 4 th scheduled class 

20% before 5 ,h scheduled class 

0% after 5 th scheduled class 

6 - 8 week courses: 

100% before 1 scheduled class 

60% before 2 scheduled class 

30% before 3 scheduled class 

0% after 3° scheduled class 

4 - 5 week courses: 

100% before 1 s ' scheduled class 

50% before 2 nd scheduled class 

0% after 2 nd scheduled class 



12 



School of Continuing Education 



• Fees will be refunded only if courses are closed or 
canceled. 

• Refunds charged on MasterCard, VISA or American 
Express must be applied as a credit to the charge 
card account. 

• Processing of refunds for canceled and/or dropped 
courses depends on date of payment and the 
receipt and processing of the withdrawal 
information. 

• Refunds take 4 to 6 weeks to process. 

• For Summer schedule of refunds, please see 
summer course schedule. 

NOTE: For students receiving Title IV Federal Aid, 
please refer to the Financial Aid section of the catalog. 



One-Day Workshops 



Withdrawals made less than four working days 
before the workshop are subject to a $25 
cancellation fee. 

If you fail to attend you are liable for the entire cost 
of the workshop. 



Cancellation Process 

If a course must be canceled due to low enrollment, the 
University Registrar will contact each student enrolled 
either by telephone or letter. Students may select 
another course or receive a full refund from the 
University. 



Financial Aid 

Forms and information about financial aid are available 
in the Financial Aid Office, Donnarumma Hall, room 
241 . Evening hours are available by appointment only. 
Call (203)254-4125. 



General Information 



Scholarships 



Alpha Sigma Lambda Scholarship— The William 
F. Murphy Award: Available to matriculated adult 
undergraduate continuing education students with a 
QPA of 2.0 or better. Sponsored by Alpha Sigma 
Lambda and named after the first dean of the School 
of Continuing Education, this scholarship is awarded 
on the basis of need. Deadlines: August 20 and 
December 15. 

Alumni Association Scholarship: Available to matricu- 
lated adult undergraduate continuing education stu- 
dents with a QPA of 2.0 or better. Sponsored by the 
University Alumni Association, this scholarship is 
awarded on the basis of need. Contact the Financial 
Aid Office for deadline information. 

Institute for Retired Professionals Scholarship: Avail- 
able to matriculated adult undergraduate continuing 
education students with a QPA of 2.8 or better. Spon- 
sored by The Institute for Retired Professionals, this 
scholarship is awarded on the basis of need. Dead- 
lines: October 15 and March 15. 

Applications for all scholarships are available in 
the Continuing Education Office or by calling (203) 
254-4220. 

• Lifetime Learning Tax Credit and Hope Scholarship: 
Speak to your accountant about reimbursement of 
education expenses. 

• Scholarship information and applications are 
available in the Continuing Education Office or by 
calling (203) 254-4220. 



Auditing 



• Students who wish to attend an undergraduate 
course but do not want credit may register as an 
auditor. 

• Auditors are not required to complete course 
assignments or take examinations. 

• Credit students are given preference in limited 
enrollment courses. 

• The fee for auditing is one-half the cost of a three- 
credit course. 

• Records and grade evaluations are not maintained 
for auditors. 

• The auditing option is not available for Intensive or 
otherwise specified courses. 



General Information 
Change in Credit Status 

Any changes in credit status (from non-credit to credit 
or from credit to non-credit) must be made in writing 
before the third scheduled class. Students may choose 
earn a professional certificate in Business Management 
by choosing six credit courses and taking them for 
non-credit. Course schedules must be approved by 
the Associate Dean. 



Library 

The DiMenna-Nyselius Library contains an extensive 
and carefully selected collection of print and electronic 
resources which include over 300,000 bound volumes, 
more than 1 ,800 journals and newspapers, over 9,000 
audiovisual items, and the equivalent of 96,000 
volumes in microform. A particular strength is the 
selective but wide-ranging and up-to-date reference 
collection. The stacks are open to all students, with 
study space at individual carrels for over 900 students. 

Hours: 

Monday - Thursday 7:45 a.m. - midnight 

Friday 7:45 a.m. - 10:30 p.m. 

Saturday 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 

Sunday 10:30 a.m. - midnight 

To contact the library for more information, call (203) 
254-4044. 



Library Database Access 

Students may access most of the library's subscription 
database from any off-campus location. To use the 
access go to www.fairfield.edu/library/elecdb1 .htm and 
click on Off-Campus Database Access. Students 
should use their university ID and personal PIN number 
to login. Choose from: Expanded Academic Index, 
Lexis-Nexis, Business & Company profiles, Groves 
Dictionary of Art, Online or Historic Abstracts and 
more. Research databases are available to current 
employees, faculty and students 24 hours a day, 
seven days a week. For more information contact the 
Library Circulation Desk at (203) 254-4044 ext. 2188. 



13 



School of Continuing Education 

Bookstore 

Located in the Barone Campus Center 

Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. 

Saturday and Sunday 1 1 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

Extended hours are kept at the beginning of each 
semester. 

Order your books online and have them shipped UPS 
to your home or place of business, www.efollett.com 



Parking 



All vehicles must display a valid University vehicle 
registration permit. 

Permits may be obtained at the Security 
Department, Loyola Hall, Room 2, phone: (203) 
254-4000 ext. 2745, or at the School of Continuing 
Education, Dolan House. 

A valid University ID or receipt of registration and a 
motor vehicle registration must be presented when 
registering a vehicle. 

Registration fees are included in the tuition for part- 
time students and students taking non-credit 
courses. 

A vehicle registration fee is charged to all full time 
students when they obtain their decals. 

Unauthorized vehicles in handicapped, fire lane or 
service vehicle spaces will be towed at the owner's 
expense. 

A number of parking spaces have been designated 
for handicapped persons throughout the campus. 
Vehicles of disabled persons displaying a current 
permit from either the state in which they reside, or 
a University handicapped permit, may park in these 
areas. 

A pamphlet detailing traffic and parking regulations 
is available at Security. 

Student Parking is limited to areas marked on the 
map inside the Vehicle Registration and Traffic 
Brochure. 



Recreational Complex (RecPlex) 

Membership in the RecPlex is available to all School 
of Continuing Education students. Part-time students 
pay a $1 00 fee each semester. Full-time students pay 
a general student fee that includes a RecPlex 
membership. 



14 



School of Continuing Education 



Campus Ministry 



Campus Ministry provides liturgies and retreats, 
counseling and spiritual direction, coordinates inter- 
faith and ecumenical religious events, coordinates 
community service and mission volunteeropportunities, 
fosters student-led ministries. All are invited to take 
part in celebrations at the Egan Chapel of St. Ignatius 
Loyola and other Campus Ministry activities. Call 
(203) 254-4000 ext. 3405 for more information. 



Security 



Located in Loyola Hall, Room 2, the Security 
Department is authorized by Fairfield University to 
prevent, investigate, and report any violations of 
State or Federal Law and/or University regulations 
on campus. 

Officers conduct foot, bicycle and vehicular patrols 
of the campus and resident areas 24 hours a day, 
365 days a year. 

The office is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. 
Any potential criminal act or other emergency 
should be directly reported to any officer or 
representative of the Security Department. Dial 
ext. 4090 or 254-4090 for immediate assistance. 
Emergency phones are located throughout campus 
to contact Security. 

It is the right of any member of the University 
community to contact the Fairfield Police 
Department to investigate any crime. 
Fairfield University complies with the "Jean Clery 
Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus 
Crime Statistics Act." This report includes statistics 
for the previous three years concerning reported 
crimes that occurred on campus; in certain off- 
campus buildings or property owned or controlled 
by Fairfield University; and on public property within, 
or immediately adjacent to and accessible from, 
the campus. The report also includes institutional 
policies concerning campus security, such as 
policies concerning alcohol and drug use, crime 
prevention, the reporting of crimes, sexual assault, 
and other matters. 

You can obtain a copy of this report by contacting 
the Fairfield University Security Department at 
(203) 254-4090 or by coming to the office. 



FERPA 

(Family Educational Rights and Policy Act) 
See page 146. 



General Information 
Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts 

The Quick Center for the Arts at Fairfield University is 
a multi-faceted facility that opened in 1 990. It is situated 
in a continuously growing community that serves a 
large and ethnically diverse population, an ideal 
environment where the Center can grow while meeting 
the needs of the surrounding community. It houses the 
740-seat Kelley Theatre, the 150-seat Lawrence A. 
Wien Experimental (Black Box) Theatre, and the 
Thomas J. Walsh, Jr. Art Gallery. The Center has 
quickly become known as one of the finest concert 
halls in this country. 



Degrees 

Associate in Arts (60 credits) 
Usually earned by students as recognition of their 
academic progress. Most students continue on with 
the Bachelor's degree. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Awarded by College of Arts & Sciences 
With Majors in: 

American Studies* 

Economics 

English* 

History* 

Philosophy 

Politics 

Psychology 

Religious Studies 

Sociology 

Visual and Performing Arts 

Bachelor of Science 

Awarded by College of Arts & Sciences 

• Biology 

• Chemistry 

• Math 

• Physics 

Awarded by Dolan School of Business 

• Accounting* 

• Finance* 

• Information Systems* 

• Marketing* 

• Management* 

'May be earned through course work offered primarily in the 
evenings and weekends. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

Awarded by School of Nursing 



General Information 

Bachelor of Professional Studies 
Awarded h\ School of Continuing Education 

An individual multi-disciplinary curriculum designed 
for mature students whose career goals cannot be 
fulfilled with one of the traditional majors. In this 
degree completion program, students may transfer up 
to 75 credits. Students may choose courses of interest 
and/or in the one of the following tracks. 

BPS Tracks 

Applied Ethics & Law 

Behavioral Science 

Information Technology 

Fast Track to graduate programs MBA, MSN 

Professional Communication 

Credit Certificates (6-10 courses) 
Business Law & Ethics 
Computer Graphic Design 
Individually designed certificates 
Information Technology 
Interior Design 
Professional Communication 
Writing 

Non-Credit Certificates 

• Professional Leadership 

• Business Management 

• Computer Graphic Design 

• Editing 

• Human Resource Management 

• Interior Design 

• On-Line Technical Writing 

• Writing 

Course Numbering System 

UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

01-99 Introductory course 

100-199 Intermediate course 

without prerequisites 

200-299 Intermediate course 

with prerequisites 

300-399 Advanced course 

(open to graduate students with permission)* 

GRADUATE CREDIT 

400-499 Graduate course 

(open to undergraduates with permission) 
500-599 Graduate course 

NON-CREDIT 

01-199 Course without prerequisites 

'Graduate Students must achieve a grade of B or better 



School of Continuing Education 



15 



Career and Academic Counseling 

• Counselors are available in the School of Continuing 
Education to help with career and academic 
counseling. 

• Appointments can be arranged during the day or 
evening. Call (203) 254-4220 or toll-free (888) 
254-1566. 

• The Career Center, located in Dolan House, is 
open Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. - 7:30 p.m., 
Friday 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.. Saturday 8:30 a.m. - 
11:30 a.m. 

• You are encouraged to bring your past transcripts 
when you meet with an advisor. 

• Matriculated students should see an advisor at 
least once a year for program review. 

• On-line advising: sceadvise@mail.fairfield.edu 



Tutoring Referrals 



Students who need individual help may contact 
Dr. Marge Glick at (203) 254-4220 for tutoring or 
information on support groups. 



Writing Center 



The Center provides help with writing term papers. 
Call (203) 254-4000, ext. 2214 for an appointment. 



Student Records & Transcripts 

Fairfield University provides legitimate access to 
student records as defined by the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. 

• Transcripts of completed courses and special 
requests for verification must be made in writing 
and are subject to a $4.00 charge. 

• Official transcripts are sent directly by the University, 
not transmitted by the applicant. 

• You may request unofficial copies. 

• You must request transcripts one week before the 
date needed. Transcript request forms are available 
in the Registrars Office in Canisius Hall, Room 
200. 

• Student grade reports are sent out at the end of 
each semester. 

• Non-credit records are retained for five years only. 



16 



School of Continuing Education 



Student Disabilities 

The University provides support services and arranges 
reasonable accommodations for students with 
disabilities. However, the University will not alter the 
essential academic elements of courses or programs. 
Students who require support services or other 
accommodations should contact David Ryan- 
Soderland, Directorof Student Support Services, Dolan 
210. Arrangements for appropriate accommodations 
may be made in a cooperative effort between the 
student, the faculty member, and Student Support 
Services. The University requires documentation of a 
learning disability. 



Request for Change of School 

Part-time students who wish to enroll in the full-time 
day school of the University must first be matriculated 
within the School of Continuing Education and have 
completed at least two semesters of study (excluding 
intersessions) in the School of Continuing Education. 
A Request for Change of School form may then be 
submitted to the Associate Dean's office in the School 
of Continuing Education. 

Upon approval, the student's file will be sent to the 
dean of the appropriate school (Arts and Sciences, 
Business, Nursing), who will review the student's 
request for admission. 

The College of Arts and Sciences requires a minimum 
Q.P.A. of 2.0 or better for admission; the School of 
Business requires a Q.P.A. of 2.8. Please note that 
transfers to the School of Nursing are by special 
appointment only, and strictly dependent upon space 
availability. Students who wish to change from part- 
time to full-time status in nursing should first discuss 
this request with a counselor in the School of 
Continuing Education. 



General Information 



The School of 

Continuing Education offers: 

Academic Services 

Academic Counseling 
College Skills Workshops 
Library tour 
Mathematics review 
Punctuation Workshop 
Tutoring referrals 
Writing Center 

Career Services 

Career information 
Career seminars 
Career testing 
Career workshops 
Computer-aided job search 
Educational advising 
Employment listings on Web 
Individual counseling 
Resume consultation 



ON-LINE ADVISING 

sceadvise @ mail.fairfield.edu 



Need Help on Deciding What to do? 

Free advising is available 
over the phone, in-person or via email. 



Call (203) 254-4220 or (888) 254-1566 
or email sceadvise@mail.fairfield.edu 



Academic Policies 



School of Continuing Education 



17 



Academic Policies 
and Procedures 



There is no formal application process for students 
who wish to enroll part-time through the School of 
Continuing Education. This provides a flexible, 
convenient option for students who wish to take only a 
few courses. Students who are planning to earn a 
degree or certificate should see a counselor in SCE 
prior to registering. First time students will be asked to 
complete the new student information form. 



Matriculation 

"Matriculation" is official enrollment in a degree 
program. After completing four courses at Fairfield 
University with a minimum 2.0 quality point average 
(QPA) and a "C" or better in each of the four courses, 
students are qualified for matriculation. The student 
should then complete a matriculation form and an 
immunization form, submit the matriculation fee, and 
have high school transcripts as well as any college 
transcripts sent to the School of Continuing Education. 

It is highly desirable to matriculate and declare a major 
field of study as soon as all requirements have been 
met, for the following reasons: 

• Academic requirements for the major will be fixed 
at the time of matriculation. If these requirements 
are changed by Fairfield University at a later date, 
students reserve the option of fulfilling the 
requirements in effect at the time of their 
matriculation. 

• Upon matriculation, credits from other academic 
institutions will be reviewed and accepted if they 
meet the University's standards. As a rule, transfer 
credits should be less than 1 years old at the time 
of matriculation. The transfer of credits earned 
more than ten years before matriculation will be 
considered on a case by case basis. 

• Once you have declared a major, the School 
of Continuing Education will inform you about 
special course offerings in your area of study. 

• You must be matriculated to apply for financial 
aid. (A student who has not yet met all requirements 
for matriculation may request, with the help of a 
counselor, the status of "provisional matriculation." 
When approved, the student will be eligible to apply 
for financial aid.) 



Students who speak English as a second language 
may be required by Fairfield University to take a 
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) 
examination. A minimum score of 550 on the exam 
is necessary for matriculation. 

Only matriculated students can be approved for 
independent study courses. 

Students must be matriculated before they receive 
credit for life experience learning. 



Before matriculation, the student should meet with a 
School of Continuing Education counselor to discuss 
courses and a plan of study leading to a degree. 

Until a student achieves matriculation status, he or she 
is classified as a "Special Student." 



Provisional Matriculation 

Provisional matriculation is available to students who 
plan to enter a degree program in the School of 
Continuing Education but who have not yet completed 
four courses. It enables students to apply for financial 
aid or provide immediate proof to their employers of 
enrollment in a degree program. 

To provisionally matriculate the student submits the 
completed matriculation form, proof of immunization 
(attached to the form), official transcripts from both 
high school and any colleges attended, and the S55 
fee. 



Graduation 

In order to graduate, students must have completed all 
assigned courses and earned the required number of 
credits for their curriculum. Students who expect to 
complete degree requirements within the academic 
year should notify the School of Continuing Education 
office at least six months prior to the anticipated 
graduation date. Students must complete the Application 
for Graduation and submit the graduation fee. 

School of Continuing Education graduates are invited 
to participate in Commencement, which is held in May. 
In order to participate, all academic requirements must 
be fulfilled and all fees paid. Students may also graduate 
in August or January, although no ceremony is held at 
these times. Students who graduate in August or January 
are welcome to participate in the subsequent May 
ceremony. 



18 



School of Continuing Education 



To graduate, students must attain a minimum of 120 
credits for a Bachelor's degree (123 to 126 credits for 
a Bachelor of Science degree in Business and 123 to 
1 28 credits for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing), or 
60 credits for the Associate's in Arts. A Quality Point 
Average (QPA) of 2.0 for courses in the major and 
overall is required for graduation. (Accounting majors 
must maintain a 2.5 QPA.) 

Honors at graduation are awarded for the following 
weighted QP averages computed for all courses: 

Summacum laude 3.85 

Magna cum laude 3.70 

Cum laude 3.50 



Transcripts 

Requests for Fairfield University transcripts must be 
made in writing to the University Registrar. Please 
enclose a check for $4 per transcript with your request. 



Academic Policies 

For academic advancement, the student must maintain 
a weighted QPA of 1.8. A QPA of 2.0 is required for 
graduation. Students who do not meet the standard of 
1 .8 will not be eligible to continue study until they have 
discussed their progress with a School of Continuing 
Education counselor. (See "ACADEMIC PROBATION" 
on page 24) The quality points per credit hour and 
numerical equivalency for letter grades are as follows: 

Quality Numerical 

Points (QP) Equivalent 

A 4.00 93-100 

A- 3.67 90-92 

B+ 3.33 87-89 

B 3.00 83-86 

B- 2.67 80-83 

C+ 2.33 77-79 

C 2.00 73-76 

C- 1.67 70-72 

D 1.00 60-69 

F 0.00 0-59 



Academic Grievance 

Procedures for review of academic grievances are 
meant to protect the rights of students, faculty, and the 
University by providing mechanisms for equitable 
problem solving. 

Grievance procedures must be initiated within a 
reasonable period of time after the event, usually 
within one semester. 

The student should first attempt to resolve any 
grievance with the faculty member. If the result is not 
satisfactory, the grievance should be documented and 
submitted to the Associate Dean in the School of 
Continuing Education together with any papers or 
tests in question, and any notes pertaining to 
conferences with the faculty member. The Associate 
Dean will serve as mediator to a fair solution of the 
grievance. 



Academic Advancement 

Each semester's course grades are computed into a 
weighted quality point average. To determine the 
QPA, multiply credits per course by quality points for 
the grade earned (A = 4.0, B = 3.0, C = 2.0, D = 1 .0, 
F = 0) and divide by the number of credits attempted. 



Attendance 

Students enrolled in the School of Continuing Education 
are expected to attend every class session. It is 
courteous to notify the instructor of a necessary planned 
absence. When students are unable to attend on the 
day of an examination, arrangements should be made 
in advance with the professor to take the examination 
on an alternate date. 



Grades for Personal and 
Professional Enrichment Courses 

The system of grading is different for each program 
area, although all are based on academic achievement. 
For specific information refer to the item on grading in 
the introduction to each program area, e.g., 
Undergraduate, Institutes, Certificate Programs. Visit 
the Personal and Professional Enrichment course 
sectionorourwebsitewww.fairfield.edu/program.htm. 



Academic Policies 
"Incomplete" Grades 

Students are expected to complete all course 
requirements by the end of the school term. An 
Incomplete ("I") is issued when, due to an unforeseen 
event, a student is unable to complete course 
requirements by this deadline. The student must pre- 
arrange with the professor to complete course 
requirements within 30 days of the beginning of the 
next regular semester. If not completed after the 30- 
day extension, the "I" will become an "F". 

No change of grade will be processed after a student 
has graduated. Any request for the change of an 
earned letter grade is at the discretion of the original 
professor of the course and must be recommended in 
writing to the Dean by the professor of record within 
one calendar year of the final class of the course, or 
before graduation, whichever comes first. 

A student may request an extension of the one-year 
deadline from the Dean of their school if he/she can 
provide documentation that extenuating circumstances 
warrant an extension of the one-year deadline. Such 
an extension may be approved only if the professor of 
record agrees to the extension and an explicit date is 
stipulated by which the additional work must be 
submitted. 



Repeat Course Policy 

When a student repeats a course that was failed, the 
new grade will be recorded. Quality points will be 
averaged into the cumulative average, and the credits 
will count toward the degree. The original failing grade 
will remain on the transcript and be calculated into the 
cumulative average. 

When a student repeats a course for which he or she 
has obtained a passing grade, the new course and 
grade will be recorded on the transcript with the 
notation "repeat course." The credit will not count 
toward the degree. The original grade will remain on 
the transcript. 



School of Continuing Education 



19 



School of 

Continuing Education 
Information 



Academic Requirements for Degrees 

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science 

The distribution of the 1 20 credits (40 courses) required 
in the School for the Bachelor's degree is: 



A. Core Areas 
Humanities 

English 



History 



Philosophy 
Religious Studies 
PH/RS/AE 

Visual and 
Performing Arts 

Humanities 

Social Sciences 



Natural Sciences 
and Mathematics 



12 courses (36 credits) 

2 courses 

(one in Composition, 

one in Literature) 
2 courses, one of which 

must be HI 30. 

Foundations of 

Modernization in the West 
1 course 
1 course 

1 course chosen from any 
of these disciplines 

2 courses, one of which 
may be a studio course 

3 courses 

4 courses (12 credits). 

from at least 2 of the 
following disciplines: 

Anthropology 

Economics (Business 
majors must take EC 1 1 
&EC 12) 

Politics 

Psychology 

Sociology 

4 courses (12 credits). 

at least 1 science and 

1 math from: 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Physics 
Mathematics 

(Specific math and science 
courses are required for 
certain majors.) 



20 



B. Majors 



School of Continuing Education 



Majors, or areas of concentration, have requirements 
specified by the respective academic departments of 
the University. More detailed information about majors 
in Business, Liberal Arts, and Nursing may be obtained 
upon request from the counseling staff of the School of 
Continuing Education. 

Available majors include: 

• American Studies 

• Business Majors in: 

Accounting 

Finance 

Information Systems 

Management 

Marketing 

English 

History 

Nursing 

Politics 

Professional Studies 
Psychology 
Religious Studies 
Sociology 
Visual and Performing Arts: 

Art History 

Studio Art 

For the above majors, all or most of the required 
courses are offered in the evening as well as during the 
day so that working adults can take courses on a 
schedule that fits with their work hours. Other majors 
for which courses are provided only on a daytime 
schedule are available through the School of Continuing 
Education for students who can take major courses 
during the day. Consult the counseling staff if you are 
interested in a major not listed above. 



Academic Programs 

Diversity Requirements 

U.S. Diversity 

In order to help students develop a critical conscious- 
ness of self and society, all undergraduates are 
required to select one course that gives significant 
treatment to aspects of diversity and pluralism in U.S. 
society. Such courses will explore in a systematic 
manner connections between race, class, and gender 
and will examine issues of privilege and difference in 
US society. Additional aspects of diversity — including 
religion, sexual orientation, and ethnicity — may also 
be considered. Approved courses will be designated 
by a special symbol in each semester's course sched- 
ule booklet. This requirement will not add credit hours 
or an extra course to a student's degree program, for 
a student will be able to select a designated diversity 
course from among core requirement courses, major 
courses, or electives. 

World Diversity 

In addition to the U.S. diversity course, a world diversity 
course is also required of all undergraduates. This 
course focuses on a non-Western culture or society, 
exclusive of Europe and the United States, and their 
literary, artistic, musical, religious, philosophical, political, 
economic, or social traditions. Though courses primarily 
emphasizing North American and European topics will 
not count toward this requirement, courses focusing on 
Native American, Russian, and pre-Columbian or Latin 
American cultures can meet the requirement. Core 
language courses do not meet this requirement while 
literature and culture courses may satisfy it. Moreover, 
such a course will not emphasize international relations 
or business relations vis-a-vis Europe or the United 
States. A study abroad experience may satisfy this 
requirement if it meets with the spirit and letter of this 
proposed mission statement. 



C. Electives 

Electives are chosen to pursue an interest, supplement 
the major, or to complete a minor. The number and 
distribution of electives vary according to degree and 
major. 



Associate in Arts in General Studies 

Students admitted to the Associate in Arts in General 
Studies Program must have been away from full-time 
study for 5 or more years. The degree is usually 
earned by students as recognition of their academic 
progress. Most students continue on with the Bachelor's 
degree. The distribution of 60 credits (20 courses) 
required of candidates for the Associate in Arts is: 



Academic Programs 

General Education Core Areas 



21 



Humanities 


8 courses (24 credits) 


English 


2 courses 




(1 in Composition, 




1 in Literature) 


Visual and 




Performing Arts 


1 course 


History 30 


1 course 


Philosophy 


1 course 


Religious Studies 


1 course 


Humanities 


2 courses 


Social Science 


3 courses (9 credits) 




From at least 2 disciplines 




Anthropology 




Economics 




Politics 




Psychology 




Sociology 


Natural Sciences 


3 courses (9 credits) 


and Mathematics 


At least 1 math & 




1 science from: 




Biology 




Chemistry 




Mathematics 




Physics 


Electives: 


6 courses (18 credits) 



All classes must be lower division courses (200 level 
or below). Learners with the long-range goal of obtaining 
a baccalaureate degree are encouraged to complete 
prerequisite courses for majors through the General 
Education Core and the Electives. 
See page 25. 



Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science 
in Professional Studies 

An individualized, multi-disciplinary curriculum has been 
designed for mature students with considerable life work 
experience whose personal and career goals cannot be 
fulfilled through oneof the traditional majors. Professional 
studies degree may be earned through course work 
offered primarily in the evenings and weekends. 

In addition to completion of all general education core 
requirements, the professional studies major requires a 
concentration of 10 upper level courses, selected in 
consultation with a faculty advisor, from four disciplines 
and at least two of the following broad areas of study: 
Humanities, Social Sciences, Mathematics. Science. 
Business, and Professional. It also requires a senior 
thesis or project to synthesize the student's 
multidisciplinary studies. See page 26. 



School of Continuing Education 

Second Major 

Students have the option of pursuing a second major 
area of study. The courses must meet the stated 
requirements of the major and must be approved by 
the chair of the department. A Double Major form is 
available in the Continuing Education office. 



Minor 

In addition to completing a major, students may exercise 
the option of selecting a minor area of study. A minor 
usually requires 15 to 18 credits. A Minor Application 
form is to be filed with the School of Continuing 
Education and the relevant academic department. 



Independent Study 

The Independent Study option is available in most 
departments to students who wish to examine a subject 
in depth for which no course is available. Independent 
study is conducted under the guidance of a faculty 
member. Students wishingtocompletean Independent 
Study must be matriculated, in good standing, and 
have completed at least 60 credits. The independent 
study application form is available in the office of 
School of Continuing Education. Students must 
complete the form and receive the approval of the 
faculty member under whose direction they wish to 
study. The maximum number of credits awarded is 
four credits for one course, and no more than nine 
credits in total may be earned by independent study. 
Students must register for Independent Studies within 
the first month of the semester. 



Residency Requirements 

Students in a Bachelor's of Professional Studies must 
complete 45 credits at Fairfield University. All other 
majors must complete at least 60 credits at Fairfield 
University. In both cases the students must take their 
last 30 credits preceding graduation at Fairfield 
University. Students in the Associate in Arts must 
complete 30 credits at Fairfield University in lower 
division courses as well as the last 1 5 credits proceeding 
graduation. 



22 



School of Continuing Education 



Academic Programs 



Credit for Prior Learning 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAMS - 
HIGH SCHOOL (AP) 

While in high school, some students pursue one or 
more college-level Advanced Placement courses. 
Fairfield University will award three or four hours credit 
towards graduation for each Advanced Placement 
course taken by a student provided that the student 
has, 1) taken an Advanced Placement test prepared 
by the College Entrance Board program and, 2) 
obtained a test score of 4 or 5. It is at the discretion of 
College/School officials to determine if such advance 
placement credits can be used to exempt students 
from specific University courses or requirements. 
Normally, AP credit will not exempt a student from 
requirements in his/her major. NOTE: No student will 
be awarded more than a total of 1 5 advanced placement 
credits by Fairfield University. 



COLLEGE EQUIVALENCY EXAMS 

Credit may be granted for specific college-level 
learning gained through self-education or non- 
collegiate sponsored instruction. Fairfield University 
is a participating institution in accepting approved 
CLEP (College Level Examination Program) and 
Excelsior examinations for credit. Both of these 
standardized examination programs are designed 
to let students demonstrate proficiency in various 
college-level subjects. The Regents examinations are 
generally taken by nursing students. 

A counselor should be consulted about applicable 
examinations prior to taking any CLEP or Excelsior 
exams. The University also accepts the evaluations of 
the American Council on Education and grants credits 
for programs comparable to its curriculum. 

PORTFOLIO CREDIT FOR 
LIFE EXPERIENCE LEARNING 

Matriculated students may choose the portfolio 
assessment process as a means of receiving credit for 
non-collegiate sponsored learning or life experience 
where there are no CLEP or Excelsior examinations. 
An evaluation process of the documented learning is 
necessary. Portfolio must be submitted to the Dean"s 
Office a minimum of one semester prior to 
anticipated graduation date. See a counselor for 
complete information. 



Transfer Credit 



Fairfield University will accept transfer credits from 
other accredited institutions of higher education which 
are members of the Commission on Higher Education. 
Records submitted are subject to formal evaluation. 
Courses will be accepted on the basis of a satisfactory 
academic record (C or better) and equivalence to 
Fairfield University courses. 

Credits accepted from universities which use the 
quarterly system will be translated to the semester 
system as follows: each quarter credit is equal to two- 
thirds of a semester credit. 

Validation by examination or departmental review is 
required of any business course credits to be transferred 
from a college not accredited by the AACSB 
Intemational-The Association to Advance Collegiate 
Schools of Business) college. The validation 
requirement will be noted on worksheets sent to 
students after Fairfield University reviews transfer 
credits. Evaluation will be done by the department in 
the Charles F. Dolan School of Business that offers 
the course under review. 

The statute of limitations for courses applicable to the 
Business major is ten years prior to matriculation. Only 
courses and credits transfer; grades do not. 

NOTE: The final 30 credits of a Bachelor's degree 
program must be taken at Fairfield University. Transfer 
credit for courses taken at other institutions will not be 
approved for matriculated students who are completing 
their final 30 credits. 

Transfer students in the Associate in Arts degree 
program must complete a minimum of thirty credits at 
Fairfield University: those transferring into a Bachelors 
degree program must complete a minimum of sixty 
credits at Fairfield University except for the BPS. 
which requires 45 credits earned at Fairfield University. 

Official transcripts, including high school transcripts 
and GED certificate, should be sent to: 

School of Continuing Education 

Dolan House 

1073 North Benson Road 

Fairfield University 

Fairfield, CT 06430 

Remember to include maiden name, as necessary, 
and current address. 



Academic Programs 

Credit Earned Elsewhere by 
Matriculated Students 

Any courses taken at another institution must be 
preapproved by the Dean of the student's school to be 
eligible for transfer credit. Only credits (not grades) are 
transferable. For each approved course taken at an- 
other institution, credits will be accepted in transfer only 
if the student has earned a grade of "C" or better (2.00 
GPA and a numerical equivalency of no lower than 73) 
in that course. Official transcripts should be forwarded 
to the Dean upon completion of preapproved coursework 
at other institutions. 

Permission to take courses elsewhere is granted only 
when the student can demonstrate compelling reasons 
to do so. 

In all cases, the following restrictions apply: 

(1) Of the 120 or more credits required for the 
bachelor's degree, a minimum of 60 of those 
credits must be earned at Fairfield University. 

(2) The last 30 credits earned toward a student's 
degree must be completed at Fairfield University or 
through a program that issues Fairfield University 
course credit (e.g., Fairfield's study abroad 
program in Florence, Italy). 



23 



Academic Honesty 



Fairfield University's primary purpose is the pursuit of 
academic excellence. Teaching and learning must 
occur in an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect. 
Such trust and respect can be developed and 
maintained only if truth and honesty prevail in the 
academic community. It is the shared responsibility of 
all members of the University community to maintain a 
climate of honesty. Administrators, faculty, and students 
all benefit from the pursuit of academic excellence in 
an environment characterized by integrity, honesty, 
and mutual respect. Such community integrity is 
fundamental to, and an inherent part of, Jesuit 
education. 

In keeping with this need for community integrity, 
students are expected to be honest in their academic 
work. The University reserves the right to penalize any 
student whose academic conduct at any time is, in its 
judgment, detrimental to the University. 



School of Continuing Education 
Acts of Dishonesty 

Students are sometimes unsure of what constitutes 
academic honesty. In all academic work, students are 
expected to submit materials that are their own. 
Examples of dishonest conduct include, but are not 
limited to, the following: 

• cheating, i.e., copying examination answers from 
materials such as crib notes or another student's 
paper 

• Collusion, i.e., working with another person or persons 
when independent work is prescribed 

• inappropriate use of notes 

• falsification or fabrication of an assigned project, 
data, results, or sources 

• giving, receiving, offering, or soliciting information in 
examinations 

• utilization of previously prepared materials in 
examinations, tests, or quizzes 

• destruction or alteration of the work of another student 

• the multiple submission of the same paper or report 
for assignments in more than one course without the 
prior written permission of each instructor 

• plagiarism: the appropriation of information, ideas, 
or the language of other persons or writers and the 
submission of them as one's own to satisfy the 
requirements of a course. Plagiarism thus constitutes 
both theft and deceit. Assignments (compositions. 
term papers, computer programs, etc.) acquired 
either in part or in whole from commercial sources or 
from other student's and submitted as one's own 
original work, will be considered plagiarism. 

• the unauthorized recording, sale, or use of lectures 
and other use of instructional materials 

In the event of such dishonesty, professors are to 
award a grade of zero for the project, paper or 
examination in question, and may record an "F" for the 
course itself. When appropriate, expulsion may be 
recommended. Moreover, a notation of the event is 
made in the student's file in the Dean's office. Any 
faculty member encountering an academic offense 
such as, but not limited to. those listed above will file 
a written report with his or her dean, indicating reasons 
for believing the student has committed an academic 
offense, and indicating the proposed academic 
sanction. The student will receive a copy. If the student 
is in a school other than that of the faculty member, a 
copy will be sent to the dean of the student's school. 
The student may. within 30 days following receipt of 
the faculty member's letter, request that the dean 
investigate the allegations and meet with the party 
(parties) involved. The dean will issue a written 
determination within two weeks of the meetings, with 



24 



School of Continuing Education 



copies to the student and the professor. If the student 
requests an appeal to the Academic Vice President, 
an Academic Dishonesty Advisory Council will be 
convened. 



Academic Probation 

The purpose of academic probation is to alert the 
student and the institution to problems associated with 
the student's academic performance and to recommend 
or implement strategies to improve the student's level 
of academic performance. The continuation of poor 
academic performance will result in dismissal of the 
student. 

Any student whose QPA for a single semester falls 
below 1 .8 is considered to be on academic probation. 
If a student fails to achieve the minimum level of aca- 
demic performance for a second consecutive semester, 
he or she will be dismissed from the University. 

Any student whose overall cumulative QPA falls below 
1.8 at the end of the fall or spring semester will be 
placed on academic probation for the following 
semester. The student will be removed from academic 
probation at the end of that following semester if his or 
her overall cumulative QPA is at or above 1 .8. At the 
end of an intersession or summer session, the student 
can petition for removal from academic probation if 
work performed during that session raises their overall 
QPA to 1.8 or above. 

University policy states that any student whose 
semester QPA falls below 1.8 for two consecutive 
semesters will be dismissed from the University. 
Therefore, in any semester that a student's QPA falls 
below 1 .8, that student will receive a written warning 
from the dean's office, notifying the student that his or 
her academic career is in jeopardy, and the student will 
be referred to the School of Continuing Education for 
a counselor. 



Academic Programs 
Academic Dismissal 

Students who incur an academic failure in any of the 
following classifications are liable to separation from 
the University: 

1 . A student who at the end of a semester has re- 
ceived the grade of "F" in three or more courses. 

2. A student who at the end of an academic year has 
received the grade of "F" in three or more courses. 

3. A student who, while on academic probation and 
enrolled full-time (i.e., attempting a minimum of 12 
credit hours), proceeds to earn a semester GPA 
below 1.80. 

Students who have been dismissed from the Univer- 
sity for reason of academic failure are normally ex- 
pected to remain away for at least a full semester (fall 
or spring) before seeking readmission. Such individu- 
als lose all entitlement to institutionally funded finan- 
cial aid. 



Withdrawals 

Procedure: 

Students who wish to withdraw from a class must 
submit a signed, written request before the 8th week 
of class for a full semester course. 
Students registered for an ASAP course who wish to 
withdraw from a class must submit a signed, written 
request before the 6th class meeting. 
The official date of withdrawal and any refund will be 
based on the date the Registrar's Office receives the 
written request (if by mail, date of postmark). 
Failure to attend class or merely giving notice to an 
instructor is not an official withdrawal and may result 
in a penalty grade being recorded for the course. 
Changes in registration, including withdrawal, are 
not accepted by telephone. 

Academic Liability: 

Students who officially withdraw from a course before 
midterm will be given a non-punitive grade of W. 
Students who do not complete the official withdrawal 
notice will receive an automatic grade of "F" (failure) 
in the course concerned. 



Academic Programs 



School of Continuing Education 



Associate in Arts Degree 



20 Courses 

60 Credits minimum 



Required courses 



25 





Fairfield 






Fairfield 






University 


Transfer 




University 


Transfer 


HUMANITIES (8 courses) 

English 11 

English 12 

History 30 

Philosophy 

Religious Studies 


D 
3 
3 

3 
□ 


□ 
3 

3 

3 
3 


MATH & SCIENCE (3 courses) 
1 Science & 1 math required: 
Biology 3 
Chemistry 3 

Math □ 

Physics 3 

n 


3 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 


Visual & Performing Arts 


□ 


3 




3 


'Humanities Electives: 












1. 


3 


3 


GENERAL ELECTIVES (6 courses) 




? 


3 


3 


1. 


3 


3 


*Select from above or Communications or Modern 


? 


3 


3 


Languages 






3. 


3 


3 








4 


3 


3 


SOCIAL SCIENCE (3 courses) 




5. 


3 


3 


Select from 2 disciplines: 






R 


3 


3 


Anthropology 


3 


3 








Economics 
Politics 


3 

3 


3 

3 


• Diversity requirement (see page 20) 
All courses must be at 200 level or below 




Psychology 


3 


3 








Sociology 


3 


3 









Students are advised to meet with an 
academic counselor for program planning. 



26 



School of Continuing Education 



Academic Programs 



Bachelor of Professional Studies 



40 Courses (up to 75 transfer credits) 
120 Credits minimum 



University Core Curriculum 





Fairfield 






Fairfield 






University 


Transfer 




University 


Transfer 


HUMANITIES (12 courses) 






MATH & SCIENCE (4 ( 


courses) 




English 11 


D 


□ 


1 Math & 1 Science required: 










Biology 


□ 


D 


English 12 














History 30 





n 


Chemistry 


□ 











Physics 


□ 





History 


□ 


n 














Math 


□ 


D 


Philosophy 


□ 


D 


• Diversity requirement 


(see page 20) 




PH/RS/AE 





D 








Religious Studies 


D 


D 








Visual & Performing Arts 


D 


D 


MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 




Visual & Performing Arts 





D 


GS399 


D 





Lecture 






10 upper division courses — Must be selected from 






at least 2 general areas 


and 4 different disciplines 


Humanities Electives: 






GENERAL AREA 1 






1. 


□ 


n 


Discipline 1 


a 





2. 


o 


o 




□ 


n 


3. 


o 


o 




a 













a 







Discipline 2 


n 


SOCIAL SCIENCE (4 course; 










Select from 2 disciplines: 








□ 


D 






Anthropology 










□ 


D 






Economics 


a 











Politics 


D 


D 


GENERAL AREA 2 






Psychology 


□ 


D 


Discipline 3 


a 





Sociology 


□ 


D 










□ 


D 




□ 


D 










□ 





Discipline 4 















FREE ELECTIVES (9 courses) 



Academic Programs 



School of Continuing Education 



27 



Bachelor of Professional Studies 



Areas for the upper division courses 



I. HUMANITIES 

Disciplines: 
Applied Ethics 
Art 

Music, Theatre, Film 
Communication 
English 
History 
Language 
Philosophy 
Religious Studies 

II. SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Disciplines: 
Anthropology 
Economics 
Politics 
Psychology 
Sociology 



IV. PROFESSIONAL 

Disciplines: 
Accounting 
Engineering 
Finance 

Information Systems 
Management 
Marketing 
Nursing 



V. OTHER 

Interior Design 



Tracks: 

Applied Ethics & Law 

Behavioral Science 

Fast track to graduate school MBA. MSN 

Information Technology 

Professional Communication 






III. MATHEMATICS & SCIENCE 

Disciplines: 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Computer Science 
Mathematics 
Physics 



Students are advised to meet with an 
academic counselor for program planning. 



28 



School of Continuing Education 



Continuing Education Courses 

GS 11 Introduction to Adult Learning 
and Development 

This course examines major adult learning and development 
theories and their implications for university study. It is de- 
signed for adults returning to college or beginning a course of 
study for the first time. Students gain an understanding of their 
personal cognitive style and how it applies to adult learning. 
Students establish learning objectives and address the com- 
ponents of a liberal arts education through research and written 
assignments. 3 credits 

GS 399 Senior Project 

In addition to completing the University core requirements and 
ten upper division courses for the BPS degree, a senior project 
is required as part of the program of study. It is usually taken 
as the last course or during the last semester of the student's 
term. 

This course is intended to synthesize and integrate the 
learner's multidisciplinary studies. This project or thesis is 
completed under the direction of a faculty member. The initial 
draft/proposal for the project should be discussed with the 
student's academic advisor in consultation with the faculty 
member. The project results in a written paper reflecting the 
various disciplines studied. 3 credits 



Support Seminars 



RM 51 Taking Effective Lecture Notes 

If you are concerned that you are not gaining the full benefit of 
your lecture classes, this seminar assists you in exploring 
different note taking styles so that you can determine which 
style helps you gain the most from your courses. credits 

RM 52 Developing Exam Strategies 

Since one of the most frightening experiences for adult 
students can be taking tests, this workshop presents sugges- 
tions for developing coping strategies for overcoming anxiety, 
studying effectively and understanding how to answer exam 
questions. credits 

RM 55 Credit for Life Experience 

Have you developed a skill that could help you complete your 
degree more quickly? Attend this seminar to learn how you 
can translate your life experience into course credits. The 
seminar includes a presentation of the various options for 
taking advantage of your previous experience and an explana- 
tion of the portfolio process as it pertains to students at Fairfield 
University. credits 



Credit for Prior Learning 

Many adults who enter college have gained experience 
in their professional lives or community activities that 
can be translated into college credit. The School of 



Academic Programs 

Continuing Education at Fairfield University offers 
students two unique opportunities for gaining credit for 
prior learning. The College Level Examination Program 
tests students learning outside of the academic 
environment in a variety of content areas. Students gain 
course credit by completing a subject examination with 
a score at the 50th percentile or higher. 

Students whose learning falls outside of the areas 
tested by CLEP can choose the option of completing a 
portfolio documenting their learning, gained through 
experience, related to a specific Fairfield University 
course or courses. Credit gained through the portfolio 
method is limited to 10 courses or 30 credits. 



Credit Certificates 

Business Law and Ethics 

BU 1 1 Legal Environment of Business 

AE 291 Business Ethics 

AE 391 Seminar in Business Law, Regulation 

and Ethics (Capstone Seminar) 
AE Elective 

BU 220/ 

325 Environment of Business / Law, 

Women and Work 
BU 320 Employment Law 

Professional Communication 

CO 100 Human Communications Theories 
CO 101 Argument and Advocacy 

(Presentational Speaking) 
CO/MG Elective 
ENW332 Business Writing 
CO 220 Introduction to Organizational 

Communication 
ENW Elective 

Information Technology 

IS 100 Introduction to Business Software 

and Information Systems 
IS 230 Information Analysis 
IS 310 Information Systems in Organizations 
CS 1 1 1 Computer Programming I (Visual BASIC) 
CS 131 Computer Programming I 
CS 134 Java Programming 
IS 235 Introduction to Business Programming 

Individually designed credit certificates 

(offered as credit or non-credit certificates) 
Computer Graphic Design 
Interior Design 
Writing 



ARTS & SCIENCES 



Majors & Course Descriptions 






30 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Curriculum Guide 



School of Continuing Education Core Curriculum 

for Arts & Sciences Majors 





Fairfield 








Fairfield 






University 


Transfer 






University 


Transfer 


HUMANITIES (12 courses) 

English 11 
English 12 
History 30 
History elective 
Philosophy 
AE/RS/PH (choose 1) 


□ 


□ 


SOCIAL SCIENCE (4 courses) 
Select from 2 disciplines: 




□ 


D 
□ 




D 




Anthropology 

Economics 

Politics 

Psychology 

Sociology 





□ 
□ 
D 

n 

D 
D 


D 
3 
D 
□ 


Religious Studies 
Visual & Performing Arts 


a 










Visual & Performing Arts 


□ 


D 










Lecture 






MATH & SCIENCE 


(4 courses) 










1 Math & 1 Science required: 




Humanities Electives: 






Biology 




D 


D 


Choose from above or Communication 




Chemistry 




D 





or Modern Languages 






Physics 










1. 


□ 





Math 







D 


? 


□ 


D 









D 


3 


a 


D 









D 






REQUIRED: 1 US Diversity course 

1 World Diversity course 



American Studies 



American Studies 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 

American Studies Major 

10 Courses 



31 



Director: Leo O'Connor, Ph.D. 

The American Studies program provides the student 
with an interdisciplinary curriculum devoted to the 
examination of American civilization - its culture, insti- 
tutions, intellectual tradition, and the relationships of 
its people. Such a course of study makes possible a 
unified and comprehensive approach to American life 
and thought. Besides the thematic unity implicit in 
such a course of studies, the student will be exposed 
to the methodological differences which characterize 
the traditional scholarly disciplines as they deal with 
the infinite complexities of the American experience. 

For more information on the requirements for a 30- 
credit major in American Studies please refer to the 
College of Arts and Sciences catalog. 

12 credits in discipline concentration. The student 
may concentrate in one of the following: fine arts, 
history, literature, politics, or sociology. 

12 credits to be selected from American-oriented 
courses in disciplines other than the discipline 
concentration. The student must select at least 
three different disciplines. 

3 credits. Research/Theme Course. Senior year. 

3 credits. American Intellectual Tradition. Senioryear. 




Discipline concentration: 

American oriented EN, HI, 
PO, SOorV&PA 

1 

2 

3 

4 

Am. oriented courses: 

Choose from at least 
3 other disciplines: 

1 

2. 

3 

4 



General Electives (10) 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 



Fairfield 
University 



AS 201 Am. Intell. Tradition 3 
AS 300 Research Theme 3 



Transfer 



32 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



American Studies 



AS 127 America in Film 

This course provides a critical examination of important 
American films with the intention of exploring the impact of 
film as a myth-making medium. Some of the topics analyzed 
include: history in film, sexual role playing, social class and 
institutions, and the religio-ethical assumptions implicit in 
American films. 3 credits 

AS 361 The American Civil War: Myth and Reality 

This course is designed to expose the student to an interdis- 
ciplinary method of learning. While using standard historical 
texts to establish the facts regarding the American Civil War, 
this course explores the sometimes confusing and contradic- 
tory versions of the Civil War as depicted in literature, 
photography, feature films, documentary films, music, paint- 
ing, and other modes of expression. 3 credits 

AS 383 America in the 1 930s: A Decade of Change 

The Great Depression was the catalytic agent in the extraor- 
dinary transformation of America in the 1930's. During this 
decade, the changes occurring in the economic and political 
sectors provided the matter for American cultural life. By 
viewing feature films and documentaries, reading popular 
and serious fiction, surveying the American theater of the 
time, listening to the popular music, viewing the public and 
private art, reading the mass circulation and little magazines, 
the student becomes acquainted with the complexities of this 
pivotal period in American life while being introduced to an 
interdisciplinary methodology. 3 credits 



Looking for on-line courses? 

We offer courses 
both on-line and web enhanced. 

To find out more, request the 
School of Continuing Education Schedule 

or visit our web site 
www.fairfield.edu/sce/index.htm. 



Applied Ethics 



Program Director: Lisa Newton, Ph.D. (Philosophy) 

The Program in Applied Ethics is an integrated set of 
interdisciplinary courses, seminars, lectures, collo- 
quia, and workshops in the fields of business ethics, 
ethics of health care, science, law, government, engi- 
neering and communications. The unified approach to 
the theory and practice of ethical conduct is designed 
to raise the student's level of awareness of the moral 
dilemmas of his or her chosen field of practice, of allied 
fields, and of the society as a whole. 



Prerequisites: 

AE courses are normally taken to fulfill the third core 
requirement in Philosophy, Religious Studies and 
Applied Ethics. One course in Philosophy and one 
course in Religious Studies must have been com- 
pleted for enrollment in any AE 200 course. 

AE 283 Environmental Justice 

(This course is cross-listed under Environmental Studies as 
EV283) 

This course offers a comprehensive study of the political 
impact of our global environmental crisis examined through 
the lens of the relationships between self, society and the 
natural world. We research scientific, ethical and economic 
perspectives that impact our ecological reality and explore 
insights from diverse spiritual and cultural traditions. Work- 
ing in self-selected groups, students have the opportunity to 
report on alternative cultural models and activist movements 
aimed at creating a global sustainable future. Students may 
not take both AE 283 and EV 283. 3 credits 

AE 284 Environmental Ethics 

A survey of the current problems in reconciling the demands of 
economic activity and the requirements of ecological balance. 
Issues considered include: the wise use of resources, pollution 
of land, air, and water, conservation of species and open 
space, and global climatic change. 3 credits 

AE 285 Ethics of Health Care 

An inquiry into the moral dilemmas of the health care setting. 
Among the topics considered are patients' rights ( paternal- 
ism; informed consent to therapy and participation in re- 
search); dilemmas of life and death (euthanasia, abortion, 
care for the dying); allocation of health-care resources; 
special dilemmas of health-care professionals. 3 credits 

AE 287 Engineering Ethics 

Engineering Ethics is a systematic exploration of the ethical 
dimensions of situations and tasks common to engineering 
practice. Issues that are explored include professionalism, 
Codes of ethics, consumer risk and safety, employee loyalty 



Applied Ethics 

and whistle-blowing, research and ownership of information, 
and the engineer's responsibility toward the natural environ- 
ment. 3 credits 

AE 291 Business Ethics 

An investigation of ethical problems in business practice. 
Topics include personal morality in profit-oriented enterprises; 
codes of ethics: obligations to employees and other stakehold- 
ers; truth in advertising, whistle-blowing and company loyalty; 
regulation, self and government; the logic and future of capital- 
ism. 3 credits 

AE 297 Ecofeminism 

This course explores the historically strong association be- 
tween women and nature, in which the image of Mother Earth 
is central, and critiques the power-as-domination assumption 
of our culture shown in the exploitation of women and of the 
earth itself. Religious, psychological, social, historical and 
scientific manifestations of this assumption are examined, 
along with alternate models of power and responsibility. 

3 credits 

AE 298 Ethics and Feminist Perspectives 

This course is a philosophical inquiry into the ethical implica- 
tions of social institutions from perspectives developed in 
contemporary feminist literature. The course explores the 
psychological and ethical dimensions of social and family 
oppression, environmental racism, medical paternalism, eco- 
nomic imperialism, and patriarchal structures in the major 
religious traditions. 3 credits 

AE/BU 391 Seminar in Business Law, 

Regulation and Ethics (Capstone Seminar) 

An interdisciplinary study of these three aspects of the busi- 
ness environment. Topics focus on the interaction of law and 
ethics, and the regulatory public policy issues in such areas as 
multiculturalism, work and family, the environment, product 
safety, international business, and advertising. This course is 
the capstone experience for students minoring in Business 
Law, Regulation and Ethics. Prerequisites: AE 291, BU 11, 
plus two additional courses in either law or applied ethics, or 
permission of the instructor. (Note: this course is cross-listed 
with BU 391; students may not take this course twice using 
distinct designations.) 3 credits 

AE 397 Seminar in Bioethics I: Life and Death 

An intensive study of selected problems in the ethics of medi- 
cine and health care practice, including abortion, euthanasia, 
pre-natal diagnosis, reproductive engineering and surrogate 
motherhood, and treatment decisions for very ill newborns. 
Format: student and guest presentations. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of Program Director. 3 credits 

AE 399 Special Topics in Applied Ethics 

A program of course, field and library work, arranged with the 
instructor. Proposals for special topics must be approved by 
the Program Director. 3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



33 



Biology 



Department Chair: Raymond Poincelot. Ph.D. 



Requirements for the Biology Major 

General Requirements 

The Biology major prepares students for future profes- 
sional work in the life and health sciences. During the 
first two years of the program, the Department re- 
quires General Biology I and II (Bl 170-171), Genetics 
(Bl 221), Ecology (Bl 260), and two semesters each of 
Inorganic Chemistry (CH 11-12), Organic Chemistry 
(CH 21 1 -21 2), General Physics for the Life Sciences 
(PS 83-84), and Calculus (MA 121-122). During the 
last two years of the degree, a minimum of five addi- 
tional biology courses and successful completion of a 
capstone experience are required. 

For more information on the requirements for a major 
in Biology please refer to the College of Arts and 
Sciences catalog. 



The Blocks 

Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology (8 courses): 
Cell Biology (Bl 227), Mechanisms of Animal Develop- 
ment (Bl 242), Microbiology (252), Molecular Biology 
(Bl 254), Immunology (Bl 256), General Virology 
(Bl 257), Laboratory in Molecular Biology (Bl 258), and 
Bacterial Pathogenesis (Bl 353). 

Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Science 
(7 courses): Wetlands Ecology (Bl 261 ). Marine Inver- 
tebrate Zoology (Bl 262). Plant Biology: Evolution, 
Diversity, and Environment (Bl 268), Environmental 
Health and Safety (Bl 270), Evolutionary Biology 
(Bl 285), Molecular Markers in Ecology and Evolution 
(Bl 286), and Coral Reef Ecology Seminar (Bl 363). 

Physiology and Morphology (8 courses): 
Human Anatomy and Physiology (Bl 107-108), Mam- 
malian Physiology (Bl 212), Endocrinology (Bl 213), 
Nutrition and Metabolism (Bl 217), Histology (Bl 231), 
Parasitology (Bl 240), Plant Biology: Morphology. Bio- 
chemistry and Physiology (Bl 269), and Cell and 
Molecular Neuroscience (Bl 311). 

Note: Advanced courses for the biology major are 
offered daytime only. 



34 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Biology Major 

10 Courses — 32-40 credits 





Fairfield 






University 


Transfer 


Bl 170 Gen. Bio. I (Majors) 


□ 


□ 


Bl 171 Gen. Bio. II (Majors) 


□ 


□ 


Bl 221 Genetics 


□ 


□ 


BI260 Ecology 


□ 


□ 


1 from Bl 242, 252, 254, 






256, 258. 353, 357 


3 


3 


1 from Bl 261, 262, 268, 






270,285, 186.363 


3 


3 


1 fromBI 107-8,211-2,213, 






217,240,269,311 


n 


3 


200-300 electives 






1. 


3 


3 


9 


3 


3 


Bl Capstone Course 


3 


3 


Additional required courses 




Core: 






PS 83 General Physics I 


3 


3 


PS 84 General Physics II 


3 


3 


MA 121 Applied Calculus II 


3 


3 


MA 122 Applied Calculus II 


3 


3 


Major: 






CH 11 Gen. Inorg. Chem. I 


3 


3 


CH 12 Gen. Inorg. Chem. II 


3 


3 


CH211 Org. Chem. & lab 


3 


3 


CH212 Org. Chem. & lab 


3 


3 


General Electives (6) 






1 


3 


3 


2. 


3 


3 


a 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


5. 


3 


3 


6. 


3 


3 



Biology 

The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education 

Bl 18 Human Biology: Form and Function 

This course represents a basic introduction to the anatomy and 
physiology of humans. The major organ systems of the body 
are examined. Attention is focused on how each system 
functions, and how all systems interact with one another. Using 
comparative methods, students come to appreciate the evolu- 
tionary origins of human form. The course examines how 
design problems (such as sharing a tube for breathing and 
eating) were overcome. Current issues in public health are 
discussed, and attention focuses on the environmental health 
problems that human populations face. Note: this course 
counts as a science core course, but does not satisfy require- 
ments for the Biology major or minor. 3 lectures. 3 credits 

Bl 75 Ecology and Society 

Students examine the available scientific evidence, and are 
encouraged to draw their own conclusions concerning environ- 
mentally sensitive issues. These issues are covered through 
lectures, readings, films, and occasional off-campus field trips 
(by arrangement). Areas of concern include environmental 
issues raised by modern society's conflicting needs for land, 
water, a livable environment, and renewable/nonrenewable 
resources. This course is open to all except biology majors. 
Note: this course counts as a science core course, but 
does not satisfy requirements for the Biology major or minor. 
3 lectures. 3 credits 

Bl 78 Introduction to Marine Science 

A course designed to introduce the nonscience major and the 
beginning biology major to the field of oceanography. Consid- 
eration is given to the physical, chemical, geological, and 
biological aspects of the world's oceans with special emphasis 
on marine habitats and the organisms living in them. Note: this 
course counts as a science core course, but does not satisfy 
requirements for the Biology major or minor. 3 lectures. 

3 credits 

Bl 82 Genes, Memes, and Evolutionary Biology 

Is evolution a fact, a theory or both? Through a reading of the 
work of some of the most influential evolutionary biologists of 
today (e.g.. Stephen Jay Gould, Richard Dawkins, George 
Williams, Douglas Futuyma) this course explores modern 
interpretations of Darwin's idea of evolution by natural selec- 
tion. Topics include a brief history of evolutionary biology, a 
basic introduction to principles of heredity, and the role of 
natural selection in adaptive change. To illustrate evolutionary 
principles, topics such as the following are considered in some 
detail: the evolution of sex, the link between dinosaurs and 
birds, cultural evolution, the evolution of cooperative behavior, 
and human origins. Note: this course counts as a science core 
course, but does not satisfy requirements for the Biology major 
or minor. 3 lectures. 3 credits 



Biology 

Bl 83 The DNA Revolution 

This course will evaluate recently developed biological tech- 
niques in the field of genetic engineering. An overview of DNA 
structure and function will be presented; however, the focus of 
the course will be on applications of modern DNA technology. 
Topics will include cloning, reproductive technology and pater- 
nity testing, identification and screening of genetic disease 
genes, gene therapy, medical forensics and DNA fingerprint- 
ing, DNA technology in agriculture, transgenic animals and 
Jurassic Park, and the human genome project. The social 
impact of the DNA revolution will also be discussed. No prior 
knowledge of DNA or biology is expected. Note: this course 
counts as a science core course, but does not satisfy require- 
ments for the Biology major or minor. 3 lectures. 3 credits 

Bl 170-171 General Biology (Majors) 

A two-semester introduction to biology for the biology major. 
The first half of the course (Bl 170) covers the molecular and 
cellular basis of life, including cell structure and function, 
energy utilization, cell communication, gene expression, and 
inheritance. The second half of the course (Bl 1 71 ) focuses on 
organismal biology, with an emphasis on evolution, population 
genetics, biological diversity, plant and animal structure and 
function, and ecology. Students receive hands-on experience 
with a broad range of topics and techniques in the accompany- 
ing lab. Formerly listed as Bl 91-92. 3 lectures, 1 lab per 
semester. 8 credits 

Bl 100 Marine Biology 
(offered summer only) 

An introduction to the flora and fauna of marine communities 
emphasizing the biota of Long Island Sound. Includes field trips 
to the local salt marshes, estuaries, rocky shores, beaches and 
mudflats. 3 credits 

Bl 107-108 Human Anatomy and Physiology 

This course is recommended for students of nursing education, 
and liberal arts. It is designed to give familiarity with the 
anatomy and physiology of body processes with special em- 
phasis on the practical aspects of circulation, respiration, 
digestion, reproduction, the glands of internal secretion, and 
including techniques for measuring blood pressure, blood 
typing, and others. Biology majors can take this two-semester 
course, which can be used to satisfy one block, either the 
morphological and developmental or physiological block. 3 
lectures, 1 lab. 8 credits 

Bl 151 Elements of Microbiology 

A course in microbiology for nursing students and future health 
care professionals. Topics presented include the structure and 
function of bacteria, viruses, yeasts, molds, antibiotics, and 
bacterial genetics. Also, mechanisms of microbial invasion and 
the body's immunological response are examined. 3 lectures. 
1 lab. 4 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



35 



Chemistry 



Department Chair: Edmund O'Connell, Ph.D. 



The Chemistry major provides the student with a very 
flexible background relative to career options. In addi- 
tion to employment in the chemical industry, students 
are prepared for graduate study in chemistry, biochem- 
istry, medicine, dentistry, environmental science, law 
and business. 

The Bachelor of Science in Chemistry can be achieved 
by following either of two tracks: the traditional track or 
the "Biochemistry Option" track. The Biochemistry Op- 
tion is not a new major, but a new sequence of courses 
leading to the B.S. in Chemistry. The Biochemistry 
Option also carries American Chemical Society certifi- 
cation. 

Note: Advanced courses for the chemistry major are 
offered daytime only. 

For more information on the requirements for a major 
in Chemistry please refer to the College of Arts and 
Sciences catalog. 



Credit for Life Experience 

or CLEP can get you closer 

to a degree! 

Call (203) 254-4220 or (888) 254-1566 
or email sceadvise@mail.fairfield.edu 



36 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Chemistry 



Chemistry Major (Traditional) 



Core: 

PS 15 General Physics I 
PS 16 General Physics II 
MA 121 Applied Calculus I 
MA 122 Applied Calculus II 
Major: 

CH 11 or 17 Inorg. Chem. I 
CH 12 or 18 Inorg. Chem. II 
CH211 Org. Chem. I 

Org. Chem. I Lab 
Org. Chem. II 
Org. Chem. II Lab 
Chem. Anal. 
Chem. Anal. Lab 
Physical Chem. I 
Phys. Chem. I Lab 
Physical Chem. II 
Phys. Chem. II Lab 
Chem. Instrum. 
Chem. Instrum. Lab 



CH211 
CH212 
CH212 
CH222 
CH222 
CH261 
CH261 
CH262 
CH262 
CH326 
CH326 
CH341 
CH341 
CH324 
CH324 



Fairfield 
University 

□ 

a 
□ 
□ 

3 

3 
3 
3 

3 

3 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 



Adv. Inorg. Chem. 3 

Adv.lnor.Chem.Lab 3 

Biochemistry I 3 

Biochemistry I Lab 3 



Additional required courses: 

MA 225 3 

MA 321 3 

General Electives (5) 

1. 3 

2 3 

3. □ 

4. □ 

5 3 



Transfer 

3 
3 
3 

3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Chemistry (Bio-Chem. option) 



Core: 

PS 15 Gen. Physics I & Lab 
PS 16 Gen. Physics II & Lab 
MA 121 App. Calculus I 
Calculus II 



App. 



MA 122 
Major: 

CH11 Inorg 

CH 12 Inorg 

CH211 

CH212 

CH222 

CH222 

CH261 

CH262 

CH326 

CH341 



Fairfield 
University 

□ 
3 

3 



Chem. I 

Chem. II 
Org. Chem. I 
Org. Chem. II 
Chem. Analysis 
Chem. Analysis Labi 
Physical Chem. I 3 
Physical Chem. II □ 
Chem. Instrum. 3 
Adv. Inorg. Chem. 3 



CH 324 Biochemistry I & Lab 3 

CH 325 Biochemistry II 3 

CH 326 Biochemistry II Lab □ 

MA 225 Appl. Calculus III 3 

MA 321 Ord. Diff. Equa. 3 

Bl 170 Gen. Bio. I (Majors) 3 

Bl 171 Gen. Bio. II (Majors) 3 

Bl 254 Mol. Bio.: Nucleus 3 

Bl 258 Lab in Mol. Bio. □ 



Transfer 

□ 
3 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 









The Biochemistry Option provides an alternative path to 
obtain a Bachelor of Science degree with a chemistry 
major. This sequence places a greater emphasis on 
biochemistry and the life sciences. The Biochemistry 
Option produces a graduate well prepared for profes- 
sional schools in the life sciences; graduate school in 
biochemistry, the life sciences, or the more traditional 
fields of chemistry; as well as employment in chemical, 
environmental or health-related fields. 



The above qualifies the student to receive a B.S. in 
chemistry but without American Chemical Society certi- 
fication. To receive certification, a 3 credit research 
course (CH 398) must also be completed. 

It is strongly recommended that chemistry majors enroll 
in at least one term of Research (CH 398) after 90 
credits. 



Chemistry 

The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education 



CH10 Chemistry - Sights and Insights 

This course will fulfill a science requirement and has no 
prerequisites. Chemistry is presented via lecture and demon- 
stration. The goal of the course is to provide the student with 
insights into the microscopic world of atoms and molecules in 
order that the macroscopic observable properties of real sub- 
stances be more clearly understood. The models developed in 
the course will be applied to representative substances from 
inorganic, organic and biochemistry. 3 credits 

CH 11-12 General Inorganic Chemistry I & II 

A two-semester sequential offering in which the following 
topics are covered: atomic and molecular weights, the mole 
concept, Avogadro's number, stoichiometry, energy relation- 
ships in chemical systems, the properties of gases, the elec- 
tronic structures of atoms, periodic relationships among the 
elements, chemical bonding, geometries of molecules, mo- 
lecular orbitals, liquids, solids, intermolecular forces, solu- 
tions, rates of chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, free 
energy, entropy, acids and bases, aqueous equilibria, electro- 
chemistry, nuclear chemistry, chemistry of some metals and 
nonmetals, chemistry of coordination compounds. 

3 credits each 

CH 11-12 Lab for General Inorganic Chemistry 
and Introductory Inorganic Chemistry 

This lab offers the opportunity to explore and experience the 
rigors of an experimental physical science. Students make and 
record observations on simple chemical systems while learn- 
ing fundamental laboratory manipulative and measurement 
skills. Experiments are chosen to demonstrate and supple- 
ment concepts introduced in lecture. The first semester em- 
phasizes the standard techniques of weighing, filtering, titrat- 
ing, use of volumetric glassware, data observation and record- 
ing and synthetic techniques. The second semester integrates 
these techniques in experimental procedures and explores 
physical properties and quantitative analysis of selected chemi- 
cal systems. 1 credit 

CH 33 Chemistry of the New Nutrition 

This course has no prerequisites and fulfills a science require- 
ment. The course is based on biochemist Roger J. Williams' 
concept of biochemical individuality and presents nutrition 
from the viewpoint of the chemist: fats and carbohydrates are 
mainly the sources of chemical energy driving body processes: 
quality protein, vitamins, and minerals yield enzyme chemical 
structures that control body chemistries. Concepts of classical 
nutrition, such as minimal daily requirements of nutrients, are 
included but not emphasized. 3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



37 



CH 84 General Chemistry for Health Science 

This course introduces the general principles of chemistry 
(matter and measurement, atomic and molecular structure, 
energetics, acids and bases, oxidation, and reduction) in a 
manner that will prepare the student to relate to properties of 
organic materials and biologically relevant substances such as 
carbohydrates, lipids, peptides, proteins and nucleic acids. 
Approximately two-thirds of the course will be general prin- 
ciples. The latter third will introduce organic and biologically 
relevant substances. This course is directed primarily to School 
of Nursing students and will also satisfy a core requirement. 
The course for School of Nursing students will require a 
laboratory component. The laboratory will illustrate lecture 
concepts and provide the student the opportunity to observe 
relevant physical systems. 

3 credits lecture only / 4 credits lecture and lab 

CH211 Organic Chemistry I 

This course is an introduction to the chemistry of compounds 
of carbon. Common functional groups are discussed from the 
perspective of molecular structure. Areas of emphasis include 
structure and characterization, methods of preparation, char- 
acteristic physical and chemical properties and their relation to 
molecular structure. Stereochemical concepts and their appli- 
cation are introduced early in the course and used extensively 
throughout. Prerequisite: CH 12, or CH 18. 3 credits 

CH212 Organic Chemistry II 

A continuation of CH 211 with emphasis on the chemistry of 
aromatic, carbonyl, acyl, and nitrogen compounds. The chemi- 
cal properties of naturally occurring substances such as carbo- 
hydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids are related to those 
of simpler monofunctional compounds. Spectroscopic meth- 
ods of structure determination are introduced early in the 
course and used throughout. Prerequisite: CH 21 1 . 3 credits 

CH 211-212 Lab for Organic Chemistry I & II 

The first semester of this lab emphasizes the manipulative 
techniques of separation, purification, analysis and simple 
synthesis. The second semester emphasizes investigative 
experiments, more complex synthesis and qualitative organic 
analysis. Corequisite: CH 21 1 -212 lecture. 2 credits each 



38 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Communication 



Communication 



Department Chair: Robin Crabtree, Ph.D. 

The focus of communication study at Fairfield Univer- 
sity is the description and analysis of how human 
beings acquire, process, and use information. As one 
aspect of a liberal education, undergraduate work in 
communication at Fairfield helps the student to: 

• Become more aware of factors that influence and 
are influenced by human communication behavior; 

• Develop intellectually by providing a basis from 
which to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate criti- 
cally messages from varied sources, including the 
media; 

• Learn techniques and strategies to propose poli- 
cies, advocate positions, and persuasively express 
himself or herself in various settings. 



Areas of Concentrated Study - 

select one of three to complete major requirements: 

AREA! 



or 
AREA 

or 
AREA 



Organizational Communication 
(at least 15 credits required) 

Media Studies 
(at least 15 credits required) 

Communication and the Human 
Condition (at least 1 5 credits required) 



Students complete at least five three-credit courses in 
one of the three "areas of concentrated study." While 
there are two specified required courses (6 credits) 
within each "area," students select the remaining three 
required courses (9 credits) from approved lists based 
upon their own interests/objectives. 



Notes about the "Communication Core" 

CO 100 and CO 101 are the foundational courses in 
the Communication major. Students must complete 
C0 1 00 and C0 1 01 with a "B" or better to continue 
as Communication majors. CO 100 and CO 101 are 

the prerequisites to all 200-level and 300-level Com- 
munication courses. 




AREA I: ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION 

(at least 15 credits) 
Organizational Communication involves the critical 
analysis of the forms, functions, and effects of commu- 
nication within business and professional settings. 
Career opportunities for organizational communica- 
tion include human resources, consulting, and public 
relations. 



AREA II: MEDIA STUDIES (at least 15 credits) 
Media Studies involves the study of the creation, 
perpetuation and reception of meaning through mass 
media and new communication technologies. Career 
opportunities for media studies include journalism, 
media production, and advertising. 



AREA III: COMMUNICATION AND THE HUMAN 

CONDITION (at least 15 credits) 
Communication and the Human Condition involves 
the critical examination of the role of communication in 
creating, sustaining, and transforming the human con- 
dition - past, present, and future. Career opportunities 
include education, social advocacy, counseling, and 
human services. 



Communication 

Communication Major 
COMMUNICATION CORE 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 
Course Descriptions 



39 



5 Core Courses 

CO 100 Human Com. Theo. 
CO 101 Argument & Advo. 
CO 201 Inter. Comm. Theo. 
CO 231 Mass Media & Soc. 
CO 309 Res. Proj. in Com.: 
The Capstone (Seniors only) 



Fairfield 
University 



Transfer 

□ 
3 



MEDIA STUDIES - 5 Courses Required 

CO 230 Hist. Mass Comm. 3 3 

CO 235 Global Media 3 



OR 



ORGANIZATIONAL - 5 Courses Required 

CO 220 Intro. Org. Comm. 3 3 

CO 221 Comm. Processes 
in Org.: Negotiations 3 3 



OR 



HUMAN CONDITION - 5 Courses Required 

CO 200 Persuasion 3 3 

CO 250 Everyday Discourse : 

Constructing Social 

Identities 3 3 



*Choose 3 Selected Required Courses 
1 3 


n 


? -I 


n 


a n 


n 


'Advisor Approval Required 

General Electives (30 credits) 
1. 3 


n 


2. 3 


n 


3. 3 


n 


4. 3 


n 


5. -J 


n 


6. 3 


3 


7. 3 


3 


8. n 


3 


9. 3 


3 


10. -I 


3 



The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education. 

CO 100 Human Communication Theories 

An introduction to major theoretical perspectives that inform com- 
munication scholarship. As the foundational course for the major, 
emphasis is placed on understanding human communication as a 
symbolic process that creates, maintains, and alters personal, 
social, and cultural identities. Students critique research literature 
in the communication field. 3 credits 

CO 101 Argument and Advocacy 
(Presentational Speaking) 

An introduction to public speaking and the advocacy process, 
including topic identification; methods of organization, research, 
selection and arrangement of support materials: audience adapta- 
tion; patterns and fallacies of reasoning; uses of evidence; logical 
proof; and refutation. Students practice and critique informative 
and persuasive presentations. 3 credits 

CO 200 Persuasion 

This course develops students' understanding of the major theo- 
retical approaches to the study of persuasion as a particular type 
of social influence. Specific attention is given to the processes of 
interpersonal influence and the media's role in changing social 
attitudes. (Prerequisites: CO 1 00. CO 1 01 .) 3 credits 

CO 201 Interpersonal Communication Theories 

An examination of one-to-one relationships from a variety of 
theoretical perspectives, focusing on the centrality of communica- 
tion in building familial bonds, friendships, and work teams. Fac- 
tors influencing interpersonal communication such as language, 
perception, nonverbal behavior, power, status and gender roles 
are studied. 3 credits 

CO 202 Group Communication 

Course designed to study the basic characteristics and conse- 
quences of small group communication processes in various 
contexts, including family, education, and work groups. Interaction 
analysis and team-building are stressed, as well as examining 
small groups in process. (Prerequisites: CO 100. CO 101.) 

3 credits 

CO 220 Introduction to Organizational Communication 

An historical and communication-centered approach to under- 
standing how business and professional organizations function. 
Course involves analysis of upward, downward, and lateral com- 
munication: communication channels and networks: power and 
critical theory: organizations as cultures: internal and external 
public communication, and leadership. Case Study course. (Pre- 
requisites: CO 1 00. CO 101.) 3 credits 

CO 231 Mass Media and Society 

The course concentrates on the impact and influence of mass 
media. Issues studied include media and violence: privacy and the 
Internet: children and television: popular magazines and body 
image; news and public opinion: and celebrity culture. Students 
engage in analyses of current media texts based on mass commu- 
nication theory. (Prerequisites: CO 100. CO 101) 3 credits 



40 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Computer Science 



Director: George E. Lang, Jr., Ph.D. 

The major in computer science, which is offered through 
the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, 
has the following goals: 

1 . To give the broad-based scientific and theoretical train- 
ing needed as a foundation for a rewarding and suc- 
cessful career in computer science. This includes fun- 
damental conceptual material which transcends cur- 
rent technology and extensive exposure to the best of 
current practice; 

2. To foster the discipline and orderly thinking which is 
used by computer scientists to reach insightful and 
logical understandings; 

3. To develop the oral and writing skills needed to ex- 
change ideas with colleagues, specialists in other 
fields, and the general public, and 

4. To acquaint the student with the social and ethical 
implications of computer technology. 

For more information on the requirements for a major in 
Computer Science please refer to the Undergraduate 
catalog. 

NOTE: Students should consult with the department 
chair to obtain approval for courses in this major. 

Computer Science 

Fairfield 

University Transfer 
Core: 

MA 171 Differential Cal. □ □ 

MA 172 Integra! Calculus G □ 
Major: 

CS 131 Computer Prog. I □ □ 

CS 132 Computer Prog. II □ □ 

CS221 Comp.Organ.&Asse.L) □ 

CS232 Data Structures □ □ 

CS 331 Oper. Syst. I □ □ 

CS 342 Theo. of Comp. □ D 

CS 343 Anal, of Algorithms □ □ 

CS 353 Prin. of Com. Des. □ □ 

CS 354 Theo. of Prog. Lang. 3 O 
3 Computer Science Electives 

1 □ □ 

2. □ a 

3 □ a 

MA 231 Discrete Math. □ D 

MA 235 Linear Algebra □ G 

General Electives (6) 

MA 217 (optional) 



Computer Science 

The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education. 

CS 111 Computer Programming I (Visual BASIC) 

Overview of computer organization and hardware. An introduc- 
tion to the science and theory of programming: top-down 
structured program design; problem specification and abstrac- 
tion; algorithms, data structures, documentation, debugging, 
testing, maintenance. Engineering applications in a high-level 
programming language (Visual BASIC) including I/O, selec- 
tion, repetition, arrays, functions, procedures. Ethical and 
social issues in computing. Emphasis on communication skills 
in documentation and design of user interface. May not be used 
toward a Computer Science major or minor. 3 credits 

CS131 Computer Programming I 

Overview of computer organization and hardware. An introduc- 
tion to the science and theory of programming: top-down 
structured program design, problem specification and abstrac- 
tion, algorithms, data structures, documentation, debugging, 
testing, maintenance. Programming applications in a high- 
level language including I/O, selection, repetition, arrays, func- 
tions, procedures. Ethical and social issues in computing. 
Emphasis on communication skills in documentation and de- 
sign of user interface. 3 credits 

CS 132 Computer Programming II 

A continuation of Computer Programming I. Additional topics in 
the science and theory of programming: modular design, 
recursion, program verification, robustness, portability. Pro- 
gramming applications in a high-level language including 
records, sets, files, pointers. Introduction to data structures 
including stacks, linked lists, searching, and sorting. Ethical 
and social issues in computing. Continued emphasis on com- 
munication skills. (Prerequisite: CS 131) 3 credits 

CS 133 Introduction to C Programming 

This course focuses on the use of the C language in top-down 
structured program design. Topics include: C data types, 
functions and file I/O. There is an introduction to software 
engineering as applied to a project such as a database man- 
agement system. 3 credits 

CS134 Java Programming 

This course is an introduction to object-oriented programming 
using the Java programming language. In the first part of the 
course, Java applets are used to build graphics tools and 
introduce object-oriented design methods. In the second part 
of the course, Java applications are used to build a complete 
graphics interface and illustrate the OOP concepts of polymor- 
phism and inheritance. 3 credits 

CS 232 Data Structures 

A study of data structures and their related algorithms. The 
data structures include stacks, lists, linked lists, trees, gar- 
bage collection, reachability, minimal path. (Prerequisites: 
CS 132, MA 231.) 3 credits 



Computer Science 

CS 233 Introduction to C++ Programming 

This course is an introduction to object-oriented program- 
ming (OOP) using the C++ programming language. The first 
part of the course introduces C++ extensions to the C 
language such as stream I/O, classes, and operator over- 
loading. The second part of the course involves the design of 
a graphics interface and illustrate the OOP concepts of 
inheritance, object constructors/destructors, and message 
passing. (Prerequisite: CS 133.) 3 credits 

CS 321 Data Communications 

Methods for transmission through physical media. Frequency 
Shift Keying, Amplitude and Phase Encoding, Quadraluic 
Encoding. Error detection and control. Multiplexers and Con- 
centrators. Polynomical Checksums. Open Systems Inter- 
face and communications protocols. Sliding window and 
stop-and-wait protocols. Radio and satellite communica- 
tions. ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) and fiber 
optical communications. Shannon and Nyquist theorems. 
(Prerequisite: CS 232) 3 credits 

CS 322 Computer Architecture 

Theory of logic design: gates, timing diagrams, truth tables, 
design of basic arithmetics operations, control mechanisms. 
The general properties of major hardware components (CPU, 
ALU, memory, I/O devices) and communication between 
them (buses, interrupts). Survey of actual computer sys- 
tems. (Prerequisite: CS 221 .) 3 credits 

CS 331 Operating Systems I 

A theoretical study of the major system utilities of a general 
purpose computer: editors, assemblers, interpreters, linkers, 
loaders, compilers. An introduction to the principles of oper- 
ating systems for a general purpose computer: command 
language, access and privacy, management of processes, 
memory, and I/O devices. (Prerequisites: CS 221 and 
CS 232.) 3 credits 



NOTE: Certain advanced courses for the computer 
science major are offered daytime only. 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



41 



Economics 



Department Chair: Philip J. Lane, Ph.D. 

The curriculum of the Department of Economics is a 
blend of basic economic concepts and their application 
to contemporary issues. Courses are designed to de- 
velop the student's reasoning capacity and analytical 
ability. By focusing on areas of application, students are 
challenged to use economic principles in stimulating 
their powers of interpretation, synthesis, and under- 
standing. Through the Department's individual counsel- 
ing efforts, majors are encouraged to tailor the course of 
study to their career and personal enrichment goals. A 
major in economics prepares the student for graduate or 
professional schools. It also provides a good back- 
ground for the business world while maintaining the 
objectives of a liberal education. 



Major Requirements 

The economics major is designed so that students 
can build on a base of concepts as they work through 
the program. Courses at the 100-level have no prereq- 
uisites; courses at the 200-level have EC 11 
and/or EC 12 as prerequisites; and courses at the 
300-level have 200-level prerequisites. Economics 
majors are urged to take MA 1 9 Introduction to Calculus, 
or MA 121-122 Applied Calculus l-ll to fulfill their core 
math requirements. Students interested in the bachelor 
of science degree should take Math 121/122. 



DID YOU KNOW? 

The School of Continuing Education 

is offering courses 

in Danbury. 

Call for more information. 



42 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Economics 



Economics 



Required 

EC 11 Intro, to Microecon. 
EC 12 Intro, to Macroecon. 
EC 204 Inter. Microecon. 
EC 205 Inter. Macroecon. 



Fairfield 
University 

3 

n 

3 



EC Electives Choose 6 

No more than 3 100 level courses 



EC 
EC 
EC 
EC 
EC 
EC 



Transfer 



2 Business substitutions allowed from the following: 
AC 11, AC 12, FI200, Fl 210, or IS 2xx 

3 3 



□ 


3 


General Electives (10 Courses) 

1. "I 


3 


2 3 


3 


3 n 


3 


4 3 


3 


r n 


3 


6. □ 


3 


7. n 


3 


8. □ 


3 


9. 3 


3 


m n 


3 


B.A. Degree 





The bachelor of arts degree is designed to prepare 
students for a wide range of practical applications of 
economic theory. Students who plan to enter the job 
market in business or government, or who plan graduate 
studies in business or law, are perfect candidates for the 
program. Its focus is on policy analysis and business 
applications. Requirements include Introduction to Mi- 
cro- and Macroeconomics (EC 1 1 and 12) and Interme- 
diate Micro- and Macroeconomics (EC 204 and 205). 
The other 18 credits can be chosen from department 
offerings. No more than three 1 00-level courses may be 
counted toward fulfilling the requirements of the major. 



B.S. Degree 



The bachelor of science degree is designed to prepare 
students for more quantitative applications of economic 
theory as practiced in actuarial work, economic re- 
search, or graduate studies in economics. The empha- 
sis in this program is on strong quantitative skills and 
statistical analysis. Students who complete this degree 
are urged to couple it with a minor in mathematics. 
Requirements include Introduction to Micro- and Macro- 
economics (EC 11 and 12), Intermediate Micro- and 
Macroeconomics (EC 204 and 205), Intermediate Mi- 
cro- and Macroeconomics Labs (EC 204L and 205L), 
Economic Statistics (EC 278), Economic Statistics Lab 
(EC 278L), Mathematical Economics (EC 290), and 
Econometrics (EC 380). The other 9 credits can be 
chosen from department offerings. No more than two 
1 00-level courses may be counted toward fulfilling the 
requirements of the major. 



EC 11 Introduction to Microeconomics 

Analysis of the behavior of individual consumers and produc- 
ers as they deal with the economic problem of allocating scarce 
resources. Includes a discussion of how markets function to 
establish prices through supply and demand, how resource 
costs influence firm supply and how variations in the level of 
competition affect the efficiency of resource use. Topic areas 
include antitrust policy, the distribution of income, the role of 
government, environmental problems. Computer applications. 

3 credits 

EC 12 Introduction to Macroeconomics 

Uses Keynesian theory to study the aggregate behavior of 
consumers and businesses as they affect the level of employ- 
ment and prices. Examines the role of government and the 
ability of monetary and fiscal policy to stabilize the level of 
output and inflation. Topics include the functioning of the 
banking system, GDP, taxation, and government spending, 
monetarism, the influence of money. Computer applications. 
EC 12 may be taken prior to EC 1 1 . 3 credits 

EC 112 Economic Aspects of 
Current Social Problems 

A policy-oriented approach is used to study contemporary 
economic issues. Topics covered include: government spend- 
ing, the role of federal budgets in solving national problems, 
poverty, welfare, social security, population, the limits to 
growth controversy, pollution, energy, regulation. No prerequi- 
site. 3 credits 



Economics 

EC 120 Environmental Economics 

This course gives an overview of the theory and empirical 
practice of economic analysis as it applies to environmental 
issues. First, it establishes a relationship between the environ- 
ment and economics. Then it develops the concept of exter- 
nalities (or "market failures") and the importance of property 
rights. Next it explores the valuation of non-market goods. Of 
most current interest, it examines the practice of benefit-cost 
analysis. Finally, it offers economic solutions to market fail- 
ures, while highlighting pollution control practices, especially 
those based on incentives. Throughout, the course examines 
current issues regarding environmental protection around the 
globe. 3 credits 

EC 210 Money and Banking 

Covers the commercial banking industry, the money market, 
Federal Reserve operations and policy making; classical, 
Keynesian, and monetarist theory. (Prerequisite: EC 12.) 

3 credits 

Note: Advanced courses for the economics major 
are offered daytime only. 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



43 




English 



Department Chair: Johanna Garvey, Ph.D. 



The English Department offers a lively and diverse pro- 
gram, with courses in literature, creative writing and jour- 
nalism. As an academic discipline, the study of English 
has these goals: 

1) to acquaint the student with the various types of 
imaginative literature, such as the novel, the short 
story, poetry, and drama; 

2) to develop the student's analytic and organizational 
skills through the interpretation of literature; 

3) to give the student further training in the organization 
and effective articulation of ideas in writing, including 
in some cases preparation for careers as professional 
writers or for careers where strong writing skills will be 
an asset. 



Requirements for the English Major 

English majors must take 10 English courses beyond 
EN 1 1 -1 2. Of these 1 courses, five must be designated 
as core courses and five must be designated as field 
electives. 

Core Literature Courses: The purpose of the core 

requirement is to expose the student to the relationship 
between the experience of literature and the contexts of 
history, genre, theory, and societal position, and to 
provide all majors with a shared but flexible pattern of 
study. In order to fulfill the core requirement, each major 
must take at least one course from each of the following 
five areas. 

Area I: pre-1 800 literature 

Area II: nineteenth-century literature 

Area III: twentieth-century literature 

Area IV: the ways in which genre affects the production 

and reception of literature 
Area V: the ways in which theoretical and/or societal 

positions affect the production and reception 

of literature. 

If a course is listed as fulfilling more than one of these 
core requirements, the student may use it to fulfill either 
but not both of those requirements. 



44 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Field Electives: The purpose of the field elective re- 
quirement is to enable the student to pursue a directed 
program of study that is responsive to his or her own 
interests and needs. To fulfill the field elective require- 
ment, each major must develop, in consultation with a 
departmental advisor, a program of study in a clearly 
defined field. A field may be defined by the parameters 
of a historical period, a geographical area, a genre, a 
theoretical approach, a societal position, a professional 
career path, or by any other parameters that will produce 
a field capable of sustaining a focused inquiry. 

The English Minor. The English minor must take five 
English courses beyond English 11-12. At least two of 
the five courses must be literature (EN) courses. 

NOTE: Student may complete the entire English 
major through the School of Continuing Education. 



English 

EN 11 Composition and Prose Literature 

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the 
writing and reading skills and strategies which best prepare 
them for the writing tasks they will encounter at the university 
level and beyond. The goals of this course are accomplished 
through student-generated writing and the study of essays 
and other forms of literary nonfiction. Note: EN 11, or its 
equivalent, is a prerequisite for EN 12. 3 credits 

EN 12 Introduction to Literature and 
Writing the Research Paper 

This course provides a study of drama, fiction and poetry as 
they reflect literary and cultural approaches to the individual's 
experience and society. EN 12 covers critical writing as an 
extension of composition in EN 11. This course also teaches 
students to write a thesis-driven, coherently developed re- 
search paper that incorporates and documents sources. (Pre- 
requisite: EN 1 1 or its equivalent) 3 credits 

EN 1 2, or its equivalent, is a prerequisite for all upper- 
level English courses. 



English 



10 Courses Required 

Areal(Pre-1800) 
Area II (19th Century) 
Area III (20th Century) 
Area IV (general) 
Area V (theory social) 

Field Electives 

1 

2 

3. 

4. 

5 



Fairfield 

University Transfer 



General Electives (10 Courses) 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10. 



Literature Courses 

EN 251 British Literature Survey I 

This course provides English majors and non-majors with an 
introduction to the major styles, themes, genres, authors, and 
periods of British literature from the Middle Ages to the eigh- 
teenth century. 3 credits 

EN 252 British Literature Survey II 

This course provides English majors and non-majors with an 
introduction to the major styles, themes, genres, authors, and 
periods of British literature from the Romantic period through 
the twentieth century. 3 credits 

EN 255 Shakespeare 

A study of Shakespeare's career as dramatist. Plays are drawn 
from Shakespeare's farces, romantic comedies, history plays, 
tragedies, and romances, and will include The Taming of the 
Shrew, Richard III, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, 
Othello, King Lear, and The Tempest. 3 credits 

EN 260 Understanding Poetry I 

Offered for those students with no previous knowledge of 
poetry as well as those who wish to develop and enrich their 
understanding of the genre; students who have experienced 
difficulty in understanding poetry in the past are welcome. 
Course readings include selections from narrative, epic, and 
lyric poetry, with concentration on shorter lyric poems. The 
course includes readings and discussions with visiting poets. 

3 credits 



English 

EN 261 Understanding Poetry II 

Concentrates on the reading of longer narrative and lyric 
poems for study of the work of individual poets. The work 
includes readings and discussions with visiting poets. Under- 
standing Poetry I is an appropriate, but not a necessary, 
prerequisite to it. Students who have not taken Understanding 
Poetry I are requested to read Perrine's Sound and Sense or 
any other introduction-to-poetry text in preparation for the 
course. 3 credits 

EN 265 Major Works of European Literature 

This course surveys some major works of world literature, from 
ancient times to the present. Because the works are chosen 
from a broad span of cultures and periods, the course focuses 
on the function of literature: what kinds of stories do people tell 
about their societies? What are their major concerns, and how 
are these represented in fiction? How can we compare stories 
from one culture or period with those from another? The course 
discusses genre and style as well as content. Books include 
The Epic of Gilgamesh, Boccaccio, Marguerite de Navarre, 
Madame de Lafayette, and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. 

3 credits 

EN 267 Modern British Literature 

A study of Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, and Virginia Woolf: 
writers who profoundly changed the shape of the novel. This 
change is also reflected in the writings of Evelyn Waugh, 
Graham Greene, George Orwell, and Aldous Huxley. 

3 credits 

EN 268 The Irish Short Story 

A study of the Irish short story, stressing its development from 
1903 with the creation of a national literature in English to the 
present. The course focuses on the deeply rooted oral tradi- 
tion, the Anglo-Irish tradition, and the native Irish tradition. 
Specific topics for discussion are: The Irish Literary Revival, 
Irish family life, and The Irish Revolution as treated in the short 
story. Among the authors explored are George Moore, James 
Joyce, Liam O'Flaherty, Maria Edgeworth, Elizabeth Bowen, 
Edna O'Brien, Mary Lavin, Daniel Corkery, Frank O'Connor, 
Sean O'Faolain, and William Trevor. Several films are shown 
including Man of Aran, The Dead, and Michael Collins. 

3 credits 

EN 269 Modern Irish Drama 

An introductory survey course in twentieth century Irish drama 
including the plays of Sean O'Casey, J.M. Synge, W.B. Yeats, 
and Lady Gregory, Samuel Beckett, Brian Friel, Theresa 
Deevey, Frank McGuiness, and Sebastian Barry. The course 
considers the work of Irish repertory theatre groups such as the 
Abbey and Gate Theatres of Dublin, the Lyric of Belfast, and 
the Irish language theatre of Galway. Videos from the Lincoln 
Center Performing Arts Library with renowned Irish performers 
such as Siobhan McKenna, Barrie Fitzgerald, and Jack 
Macgowan are viewed. Finally, the class attends Irish plays 
performed at the Irish Arts Center and the Irish Repertory 
Theater in New York City, (formerly EN 357) 3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



45 



EN 270 Studies in American Literature 

This course begins with a survey of the Puritan background to 
American literature and the writings of the early republic. The 
emphasis is placed on the early national period and the 
romantic phase in American literature leading up to the Civil 
War. The writers studied include Irving, Cooper, Melville, Poe. 
Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Whitman. 3 credits 

EN 271 The Frontier in American Literature 

For the last five centuries, the frontier - understood as the 
place where "humanity" comes into contact with its apparent 
absence in the shape of alien beings and landscapes - has 
been the subject of some of the most lasting powerful American 
stories. In this course, we concentrate on some of the major 
representations of the frontier produced between the 1820s 
and the present in order to learn how to recognize and talk 
about the position that the American "western" has occupied in 
our culture. Authors include Cooper. Twain. Cather. and 
McCarthy; filmmakers include Ford, Peckinpagh. and Eastwood, 
(formerly EN 385) 3 credits 

EN 272 Development of the American Short Story 

This course traces the development of the American short 
story from its emergence in the literary-historical context of 
19th century America to its maturity in the 20th century. It 
explores most intensively the writings of Poe, Hawthorne. 
James, and Hemingway, but considers, as well, the contribu- 
tions to the genre of Irving, Crane, and numerous other writers. 

3 credits 

EN 273 Irish-American Literature 

An examination of the Irish voice in American literature over the 
past two hundred years. Rooted in the eighteenth century, 
proliferating in the nineteenth, and flourishing in the twentieth. 
Irish-American literature is one of the oldest and largest bodies 
of ethnic writing produced by a single American immigrant 
group. The course focuses mainly on Irish-American writing of 
the twentieth century, although a sampling of earlier works is 
also studied. Among the authors included in the course are 
Finley Peter Dunne, F. Scott Fitzgerald. Eugene O'Neill. John 
O'Hara, James T. Farrell, J. F. Powers, Edwin O'Connor, 
Maureen Howard, J. P. Donleavy, Peter Hamill. William 
Kennedy, Mary Gordon, Frank McCourt, Alice McDermott. and 
Dennis Smith. 3 credits 

EN 279 Irish Literature 

A survey of Irish literature, including drama, poetry, prose from 
the eighth century to the present. The course includes a study 
of the Irish Literary Renaissance (Yeats, Synge. Lady Gregory, 
the Abbey Theatre) as well as the work of more recent Irish 
writers (Seamus Heaney. Eavan Boland. Brian Friel. Edna 
O'Brien) and some study of contemporary Irish film. 

3 credits 

EN 282 The Study of Human Behavior 
Through Literature 

Students are taught how to apply basic theories from psycho- 
analysis and humanistic psychology to folk literature, drama, 
and fiction. 3 credits 



46 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



EN 283 The Modern Italian Short Story 

This course explores the Italian short story, focusing on the 
major writers of the 20th-century. There is an emphasis on 
neorealism. a term applied to a group of writers and filmmakers 
who emerged in 1945 and dealt in a forthright manner with 
everyday life. Some topics of discussion: World War 1 1 . Mussolini, 
fascism, and the Italian family. Special attention is paid to the 
works of Italo Calvino. one of Italy's most imaginative storytell- 
ers. Otherwriters include: Pirandello. Svevo. Parvese. Moravia. 
Ginzburg. Vittorini. and Soldati. Two neorealist films shown: 
Rossilini's Open City and De Sica's The Bicycle Thief. 

3 credits 

EN 285 The Modern Tradition: 
International Short Fiction 

A study of important works of short fiction from around the 
world written during the last century. Texts have been selected 
on the bases of the degree to which and the specific manners 
in which they may be said to contribute to a characteristically 
"modern" sense of human existence and the function of narra- 
tive art. Through textual analysis, an effort is made to compare 
and contrast various versions of the modern experience as 
produced by such authors as Gogol. Melville. Mansfield. Joyce. 
Lawrence, Cather. Tolstoy. Chekhov. Kafka. Hemingway. 
Lessing. Borges. Barth. Boll. Mishima. Achebe. Erdrich, and 
Atwood. 3 credits 

EN 289 Modern Women Writers 

The course is a study of works by English, American. British 
and Australian writers of the 20th century, with particular 
emphasis on their efforts to address the conflicts encountered 
by women of diverse backgrounds in their various roles and 
stages in life. The genres includes fiction, memoir and autobi- 
ography. There is continuing attention to the literary traditions 
established by women authors, such as Virginia Woolf. Char- 
lotte Perkins Gilman, Edith Wharton. Kate Chopin. Sylvia 
Plath, Susanna Kaysen. Jill Ker Conway. Maya Angelou. 
Carolyn Chute. Anne Tyler and Harriett Doerr. 3 credits 

EN 335 Gender and Sexuality 
in Film and Literature 

This course examines the way gender and sexuality are repre- 
sented in film and literature. We begin with an overview of 
lesbians and gays in film history with Vito Russo's The Celluloid 
Closet we then move through some popular films and novels 
from the 1 960s to the present day. looking at the ways attitudes 
about gender are enmeshed with representations of homo- 
sexuality. Some of the themes and questions discussed are: 
What is the relationship between gender and sexuality? How 
are concepts of masculinity and femininity presented in novels 
and on screen? How have these representations changed, as 
our culture's rules about gender and sexuality have become 
less rigid? The goal of the course is to develop an analysis of 
current cultural assumptions about gender and sexuality, as 
they are revealed in film and fiction. 3 credits 



English 

EN 342 Voices and Visions: 
Five American Poets 

An intensive study of five major American poets. Poems by 
Walt Whitman. Emily Dickinson. Robert Frost. T.S. Eliot and 
Langston Hughes are considered. The aim of the course is to 
examine significant themes in the work of these poets, and to 
explore the ways in which the poetic process develops struc- 
tures and meanings through patterns of imagery and the 
complex resources of language. Some attention is given to the 
biographies of the poets and the historical periods in which they 
worked. 3 credits 

EN 345 Representations 

This course focuses on "'ways of seeing" and the "gaze" which 
are constructed and maintained in contemporary culture within 
the concept of representation. The course is balanced on the 
margins of textual and visual materials (paintings and films), 
has an interdisciplinary theoretical base, and will examine the 
"presentation" and "representation" of self, subject, and iden- 
tity as narrative, biography, and autobiography. We focus upon 
the notion of realism and politics of realism (or between 
traditional ways of seeing and deconstructed ways of seeing). 
By reading theoretical tracts on the "ways of seeing" and by 
using films and art slides to test these theoretical materials, we 
critique contemporary notions of "seeing" and "being seen." 
Crosslisted under Visual and Performing Arts as FA 345. 
Students are not permitted to take this course under both 
designations. 3 credits 

EN 351 Writing the Immigrant Experience: 
Novels of Dislocation and Identity 

Moving to a new country causes a loss of identity: creating a 
new way of life involves building a new self. The novels we read 
in this course chart the ways different immigrants to the United 
States respond to the need to recreate the self. The writers 
grapple with a new language and cultural obstacles: we ex- 
plore the ways in which identity is created through this experi- 
ence. The immigrant shapes a new self by assimilating into the 
dominant culture or marking one's difference from it. We look 
for what all these writers have in common as they use fiction to 
create a new identity, and we ask what it means to "be an 
American" in a multi-ethnic society. 3 credits 

EN 355 Shakespeare I: The Elizabethan Age 

A study of Shakespeare's earlier comedies and history plays. 
Works include The Taming of the Shrew. A Midsummer Night's 
Dream. Richard III. and Henry IV. Part One. Romeo and Juliet 
is also studied as an early tragedy. 3 credits 

EN 356 Shakespeare II: The Jacobean Age 

A study of Shakespeare's later comedies and the tragedies. 
Plays include romantic comedies {As You Like It. Twelfth 
Night), tragedies {Hamlet, Othello, King Lear), problem com- 
edies {Measure for Measure), and romances {The Tempest). 

3 credits 

EN 361 18th Century English Literature 

A selective survey of 18th century English literature. Authors 
studied include Pope. Swift. Gray, Johnson, Boswell, Gold- 
smith. Burns, and Montague. 3 credits 



English 

EN 362 Autobiography 

Autobiography is a presentation of the writer's self to the 
reader, and it has a special fascination. The author's revelation 
draws the reader into a unique partnership: the reader's belief 
joined to the author's "confession" creates the autobiographi- 
cal self. This course examines autobiographical writings from 
St. Augustine to the 20th century and considers their purpose: 
What do the authors reveal about themselves, and why? How 
much is convention, how much the truth? 3 credits 

EN 367 Victorian Poetry & Poetics 

A study of poetry and theories of poetry by Victorian men and 
women. This course examines the various and varying con- 
cepts of "self" vis-a-vis Victorian culture, religion, science, 
politics, and sexuality in the works of some major poets. 
Beginning with Arnold and ending with Wilde, the course 
explores the poetics of literary movements such as Victorianism, 
Pre-Raphaelitism. Decadence, Aestheticism, and Symbolism. 

3 credits 

EN 368 Imperial Fiction: 

Novels of the West and East 

This course examines the tenor and temper of some British 
novels which are also tales of colonization. These tales are 
measured against the responses from peoples in those colo- 
nized nations. Specifically, the course focuses on theoretical 
questions which address colonized subjectivities by raising 
questions on issues of nation/narration, minority discourse/ 
canonical injunctions, imperial/colonial subjectivity, identity, 
home and location/dislocation. The foundational and over- 
arching premise of "orientalism" (as a gaze turned upon the 
colonized) undergirds most of the class discussions. 

3 credits 

EN 370 Victorian Novels 

This course forges a sense of continuity from the emergence 
of the novel in the 18th century to the development of the 
modern novel in the 20th century. By examining the various 
narrative strategies employed by writers during the 19th cen- 
tury, it re-addresses central Victorian concerns such as the 
tensions between the classes and the contentions between the 
sexes. This course also helps situate the origins of ideological, 
psychological, and social issues that come to dominate the 
modern novel by deconstructing the discourses of "self," 
"woman," "sexuality," and "family/marriage." We read Sand. 
Eliot, Dickens, Thackeray, Pater, Hardy, and Michel Foucault. 

3 credits 

EN 372 Comedy 

A survey of various forms of literary, dramatic and film comedy 
from Aristophanes to Joseph Heller. Emphasis is on how comic 
writers and directors use structure, character, tone, and con- 
vention to create comic forms, including festive comedy, satire, 
comedy of manners, farce, and black comedy. 3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



47 



EN 374 The Modern British Novel: 
Henry James to the Present 

An analysis of significant developments in the British novel 
which occurred between the end of the 19th century and the 
contemporary period. Particular attention is paid to the great 
experimental novelists whose innovations radically changed 
the novel as a literary form and reflector of reality, writers such 
as Henry James, Joseph Conrad, D.H. Lawrence, James 
Joyce, and Virginia Woolf. 3 credits 

EN 376 Modern Drama 

Selected readings of major modern Western plays from around 
1 850 to the end of the Second World War in 1 945. The course 
includes plays from such major Western dramatists as Buchner. 
Ibsen, Shaw, Pirandello, Chekhov, and Brecht. with an occa- 
sional inclusion of lesser or non-canonical figures. The course 
operates in the form of a seminar and focus on close and 
careful reading of selected plays, paying attention to thematic 
and structural elements, conventions of the form or genre, and 
the cultural-material conditions under which the plays were 
created. 3 credits 

EN 377 Contemporary Drama 

This course includes close and careful reading of contempo- 
rary plays from around 1950 to the present, beginning with 
Beckett and ending with the most recent plays available in text 
form. This course has a seminar format, and requires atten- 
dance and critical review of at least one live performance. 
Besides close and careful attention to thematic and structural 
elements and to conventions underlying dramatic form or 
genre, this course addresses the cultural-material conditions 
under which selected plays were created. 3 credits 

EN 378 The Spirit of Place — Environment as 
a Shaper of Identity in America 

This course explores the psychological, sociological, and physi- 
cal effects of the American Environment from the East coast to 
the West coast through essays, drama, novels and poetry. 
Through the writings of Arthur Miller. Tennessee Williams. 
Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson, Willa Cather. Edith Wharton, 
Nathaniel West, Wendell Berry, Philip Levine. M. Scott 
Momaday, among many others, the student studies the con- 
nection between place and soul as the sociological history of 
America unfolds chronologically. The student is able to better 
understand his/her identity rooted in a particular place through 
the mirror of the literature. 3 credits 

EN 379 Film and Literature 

This course begins with a survey of the film industry's historical 
dependency upon literary properties. A comparison analysis is 
made of specific films adapted from novels, plays, short sto- 
ries, and poems. The overall intention of this course is to 
provide the student with a historical and critical perspective on 
the film as an art form. 3 credits 



48 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



EN 380 Colonial American Literature 

A survey of American literature between 1620 and 1830. 
focusing on the historical, theological, political, and personal 
contexts that conditioned the development of a recognizably 
"American" mode of literary representation. Authors include 
Shepard. Bradstreet, Rowlandson. Wheatley, Jefferson, 
Franklin, Brown, and Irving. 3 credits 

EN 381 American Romanticism 

A survey of American literature between 1830 and 1865, 
focusing on the relationship between this literature and the 
cultural and political history of the period. Authors include 
Emerson, Fuller, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, Fern, 
Jacobs. Whitman, and Dickinson. 3 credits 

EN 382 American Literature: 1865-1920 

This course concerns itself with the evolution of American 
realism after the Civil War and the subsequent naturalistic 
movement in American Literature. The writings of Twain, 
Howells. DeForest, James, Crane, Dreiser, and others. 

3 credits 

EN 383 American Literature: 1920-1950 

The development of the modern American writer is traced from 
the post-World War I era through the Depression and to the 
period immediately following World War II. The writings of 
Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Frost, Steinbeck. O'Neill. 
Mailer. Lowell, Bellow, and others. 3 credits 

EN 384 American Literature: 1950-Present 

Significant developments in American fiction and poetry from 
the period immediately following World War II to the present. 
The writings of Salinger, Updike. Bellow. Vonnegut, Malamud, 
Barth, Pynchon, Ginsberg, Ferlinghetti, Sexton, and others. 

3 credits 

EN 387 The American Novel 

Tracing the American novel from its imitative beginnings to its 
development as a unique literary form is the matter of this 
course. Representative novels by Hawthorne, Melville. James, 
Faulkner, Bellow, etc., are examined during the semester. 

3 credits 

EN 389 Literature and Religion: 
The American Experience 

This course surveys the relationship of literature to religion in 
the history of American letters. Beginning with the moral 
didacticism of early Puritan literature, the American writer has 
manifested a persistent concern with religio-ethical matters as 
well as the impact of religious institutions in shaping our social 
and cultural environment. Using literary texts by major Ameri- 
can writers, the course evaluates both the critical perspective 
and relevance of the imaginative writers treatment of religious 
questions. 3 credits 



English 

EN 391 Myth in American Literature 

This course starts with an introduction to myth, in general, as 
an imaginatively conceived worldview or explanation of the 
meaning of life. Among the topics considered are the nature 
and genesis of myth, and the function of myth for the individual 
in the search for meaning and for the community in its search 
for collective meaning. 

These ideas are then applied to mythic themes which have 
given structure to the American experience, particularly to the 
Myth of Adam, the Fall, the Seduction of Innocence, and 
Coming of the Tragic Hero, and Rebirth and Redemption. 
Among the American authors read are Emerson, Hawthorne, 
Melville, Howells, James, Dreiser, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, 
Flannery O'Connor, and Vonnegut. 3 credits 

EN 396 The Quest for Meaning in 
Children's Literature 

There is a large body of important literature for and about 
children which merits the attention of all serious students of 
literature. This course is an in-depth study of the search for 
existential meaning in some old and modern works which 
reflect the child's view of the world and the adult's view of 
childhood. Readings include Classic Fairy Tales (ed. by Opie), 
Grahame's The Wind in the Willows, E.B. White's Charlotte's 
Web, O'Dell's Island of the Blue Dolphins, and Oberski's 
Childhood. This course is not open to students who have taken 
EN 293. Classics in Children's Literature. 3 credits 



Writing Courses 

EN/W200 Creative Writing 

This course is designed to foster creativity and critical acumen 
through extensive exercises in the composition of poetry and 
fiction, (formerly ENA/V 300) 3 credits 

EN/W 202 Creative Writing: Poetry I 

Basically this is a workshop course concentrating on the 
analysis and criticism of student manuscripts, though a portion 
of the course is devoted to a discussion of major trends in 
contemporary poetry and significant movements of the past. 
Consideration is given to traditional forms, such as the sonnet 
and villanelle, as well as to modern experimental forms and 
free verse. Students are advised how to prepare and submit 
manuscripts to publishers, (formerly EN/W 302) 3 credits 

ENA/V 204 Creative Writing: Drama 

For the student who desires a workshop approach to the 
composition of drama for the stage. Attention is given to the 
physical aspects of the stage and to problems of acting and 
production as they impact on the written word. The course 
concentrates on analysis of student manuscripts, and there is 
also some discussion of the work of major playwrights to 
illustrate various aspects of dramatic technique, (formerly 
EN/W 304) 3 credits 



English 

EN/W 205 Creative Writing: Fiction I 

This course is for the student who seeks an intensive workshop 
approach to the composition of fiction. Emphasis is on the short 
story, and the course focuses on the analysis of student 
manuscripts, though there is also some discussion of the work 
of significant authors (past and present) as a way of sharpening 
the student's awareness of technique. The literacy market- 
place for fiction is also discussed, (formerly EN/W 305) 

3 credits 

EN/W 208 Writing Fantasy, Science Fiction, 
and Suspense 

Students study appropriate models written in the genres of 
fantasy, science fiction, and suspense. They concentrate on 
classroom exercises and extended writing projects to gain 
proficiency in writing these genres. Special attention is given to 
how these modes differ from more realistic types of literature 
and how to generate in the reading audience a receptive state 
of mind, (formerly EN/W 308) 3 credits 

EN/W 214 Speech: Writing and Delivery 

This course, which is an introduction to platform speaking, 
includes training and practice in the preparation and delivery of 
a speech. It also includes an introduction to the techniques of 
argumentation and persuasion, (formerly EN/W 314) 

3 credits 

EN/W 220 News Writing 

This introductory course emphasizes the techniques used by 
reporters to collect information and write stories, primarily for 
newspapers but also for magazines and broadcast outlets. 
Students learn how to gather information, interview sources, 
write leads, structure a story, and work with editors. Students 
analyze how different news organizations package informa- 
tion, hear from guest speakers, and visit working journalists in 
the field. Students develop a higher level of "media literacy" 
and learn how to deal with the news media in their career. 
(Note: English Department rules call for completion of EN 11 
and EN 12 before taking any other courses. Formerly 
ENW 322, Introduction to Writing for the Press. Not available 
to students who have completed that course.) 3 credits 

EN/W 221 Contemporary Journalism 

This intermediate level course sharpens student news gather- 
ing, writing and editing skills and prepares them for the de- 
mands of journalism jobs in the 21st century. Students write 
longer story packages, both in conventional print formats and 
in HTML language for World Wide Web distribution. Students 
cover on-campus and of-campus events, and also discuss libel 
and ethical concerns that can affect their writing and careers. 
(Note: course was previously numbered EN/W 321.) (Prereq- 
uisite: News Writing or permission of instructor.) 3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



49 



EN/W 222 Journalism Editing and Design 

Editing skills are in high demand in today's journalism job 
market, both for traditional and on-line sources of information. 
This intermediate level course emphasizes conciseness, pre- 
cision, accuracy, style, and balance in writing and editing. The 
course includes researching and fact-checking, basic layout 
and design, headline and caption writing, and on-line editing. 
It is one of three cornerstone courses in journalism writing 
(along with News Writing and Contemporary Journalism.) 
(Prerequisite: News Writing or permission of instructor.) 

3 credits 

EN/W 287 Writing the Memoir 

(offered in School of Continuing Education only) 

Writing our life's stories. Memoirs of significant penod(s) in 
your life: Life in the service: your childhood; your children and 
grandchildren; your relationships with your parents: your 
expedition(s); your business venture(s): etc. Serves as pos- 
sible preparation for writing a full autobiography later on. 
Publication not the goal, but will be discussed. 3 credits 

EN/W 295 Composition and Style 

This course is designed as an intermediate course in basic 
non-fiction prose for those who wish to work further than EN 1 1 
on their writing skills. Emphasis is on the cultivation of an 
individual style in short essays on everyday topics. 3 credits 

EN/W 305 Creative Writing: Fiction II 

This course is for those who have taken Creative Writing: 
Fiction I. While the class discusses the short short story, the 
novella, and the novel, it spends the most time on the full-length 
short story. To that end, the class discusses the work of six 
authors - Raymond Carver, Louise Erdrich. Ursula Hegi. Denis 
Johnson, Alice Munro, and Joyce Carol Oates - paying particu- 
lar attention to the structure of each story. Each class member 
writes one short story, two full-length stories, and a longer 
project. (Prerequisite: EN/W 205.) 3 credits 

EN/W 320 Writing the Feature Story 

Feature writing is used to tell stories through people and places 
that are affected by news events or through a prominent issue 
of concern. The article type may take the form of personality 
profiles, consumer stories, travel articles, or trend pieces. This 
intermediate level course explores where feature stories are 
found, how they are constructed, and what makes them vi- 
brant. Students also examine ways to market feature articles to 
newspapers and magazines. (Note: course was previously 
numbered EN/W 326.) (Prerequisite: News Writing or permis- 
sion of instructor.) 3 credits 

EN/W 322 Sports Reporting 

Students in this advanced course learn how to capture the 
drama of sports events, on and off the field. They learn to write 
traditional game stories and profiles while also strengthening 
skills in interviewing, writing under deadline pressure and 
analyzing statistics. But they also go beyond spot stories to 
explore and write about the bigger picture, newer issues, and 
the overall allure of sports. (Prerequisite: News Writing or 
permission of instructor.) 3 credits 



50 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



English 



EN/W 332 Business Writing 

This course introduces various forms of business writing, e.g.. 
memos, letters, reports, news releases, advertising, speeches, 
employment resumes. During fall and spring semesters, stu- 
dent teams conduct major projects at corporations and non- 
profit organizations. In-class exercises and homework hone 
basic writing skills as they apply to business communication. 

3 credits 

EN/W 333 Corporate Communication 

The course provides a contemporary overview of various 
facets of communication within a corporate environment. It 
introduces students to the principles, tools and techniques of 
corporate communication, exposing them to issues such as 
intercultural and nonverbal communication, positioning, and 
electronic communication. The syllabus covers topics such as 
interviewing skills, crisis communication, career planning and 
marketing, visual communication, event management, and 
direct mail. The course consists of lectures, class discussion 
groups, assignments and projects, and guest lectures by 
corporate communication professionals. This course is ex- 
tremely helpful to those students who already have a ground- 
ing in business writing and presentation skills. 3 credits 

EN/W 335 Technical Writing 

This course introduces students to writing clearly and coher- 
ently about specialized information for a general audience. 
Students begin by writing an article, suitable for a popular 
magazine such as Discovery or Omni, on an issue related to 
science, health, or the environment. Students then learn to 
write instructions, proposals, and documentation. Students are 
introduced to document design, visual aids, and user-testing. 
The course is suitable for science and non-science majors. 

3 credits 

EN/W 338 Persuasive Writing 

This course is for students who wish to strengthen their skills 
in argumentation. Students write to a variety of audiences in a 
variety of forms, such as editorials and proposals. Revision is 
emphasized: classes include some workshops and several 
peer editing sessions. Students are encouraged to develop a 
clear, forceful prose style. 3 credits 

ENW 341 Writing Creative Non-Fiction 
(offered in School of Continuing Education only) 

This course required field research and the reading of articles 
and books by John McPhee. GayTalese. Joan Didion. Edward 
Hoagland, Jan Morris, Tom Wolfe. There will be writing and 
revision every week, and one major piece to research and 
write. 3 credits 

EN/W 347 (Fall) or EN/W 348 (Spring) 
Independent Writing Project 

Individual tutorials in writing. Students can obtain credit for 
writing for The Mirror. The Sound, or for other projects of 
personal interest. Course can be taken up to three times for 
credit. By permission of instructor. (Note to majors: only one 
Independent Writing Project can be counted as fulfilling the 
need for five field electives to complete the major. The depart- 
ment will consider exceptions only if multiple Independent 
Writing Project courses cover totally different subject areas; 
approval in advance is required.) 3 credits 



History 



Department Chair: David McFadden, Ph.D. 

The Department of History introduces students to the 
richness and complexity of the human experience. The 
discipline of history trains students to understand history 
as "process": to research, analyze, synthesize, and 
critically evaluate evidence. To the historian, factual 
information is never an end in itself, but a means to 
understand how the conditions of our own day evolved 
out of the past. Students who attain high standards of 
scholarship are sponsored for membership in the 
Departments Psi Theta Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, the 
International Honor Society for History, and participate 
in the special programs under its auspices. 



The Major 

For the B.A. degree in history, the major must complete 
History 30 and at least nine upper-division history courses 
(1 00 level and above). Four of these nine courses must 
be designated as advanced (300 level) of which at least 
two must involve a major research paper. The research 
seminar requirement may be fulfilled through HI 399. To 
ensure a broad background in historical study, majors 
are required to complete two upper-division courses in 
European history, two upper-division courses in U.S. 
history and two upper-division courses in non-Western 
history (Africa, Asia. Latin America, Middle East). At 
least one of these upper-division courses must focus 
primarily upon a period prior to 1 750: at least one must 
focus primarily upon a period after 1750. 

NOTE: Students may complete the entire History major 
through the School of Continuing Education. 



History 

History 

Fairfield 
University 

Requirements 

9 Upper Div. Courses (4 at 300 level) 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 
Introductory Courses 



51 



Transfer 



European History prior to 

1 


1700 

1 

. 3 

3 

3 
3 

3 

3 

. 3 

urses) 

3 

- 3 
3 

- 3 
3 

. □ 

. 3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

_ 3 


3 


Other European History 
1 


3 


American History 
1. 


3 


2. 


3 


Third World History 
1. 


3 


? 


3 


History Electives 

1 


3 


P 


3 


a 


3 


General Electives (12 Co 
1 


3 


2 


3 


a 


3 


4 


3 


R 


3 


fi 


3 


7. 


3 


8. 


3 


9 


3 


10. 


3 


11. 


3 


MP 


3 



*lf History Major course is used to fulfill a core 
requirement. 12 general electives are needed. 



The University requires that all students take two history 
courses as part of their humanities studies within the 
liberal arts core curriculum. This requirement is fulfilled 
by HI 30 plus one intermediate-level course. 

HI 30 Europe and the World in Transition 

The course examines the history of Europe and its relationship 
to the world beyond from the end of the Middle Ages through 
the 19th century. Emphasis is placed on the cultural, social, 
economic and political forces and structures that led to the 
development of commercial and industrial capitalism, and 
upon the effects of this development on Europe, the New 
World, Asia and Africa. 

Topics include the Renaissance and Reformation. European 
expansion and colonialism, the development of strong nation 
states, the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution and con- 
flicting ideological and political responses, changing social, 
family and gender relationships, and the increasing interaction 
of European and non-European peoples. 
Critical analysis of primary and secondary sources will develop 
skills in historical methodology that are of great value in many 
other academic pursuits. These skills will be enhanced through 
written assignments and class discussions. 3 credits 



Intermediate Courses, 200-299 

All intermediate courses require HI 30 as prerequisite. 

HI 200 The Birth of the Post-Modern World. 
1850-1950 

In the second half of the 19th century industrial, social, and 
scientific progress enables the West to conquer the globe. But 
the increasing mechanization of society brings the alienation of 
the individual and the growth of class and racial antipathies. A 
wave of -isms (Marxism, nationalism, imperialism, etc.) in- 
creases the stress. Ultimately the impact of two world conflicts 
demonstrates the fragility of Western supremacy and raises 
major problems of relationships with the Third World and the 
social revolutions within the old system. 3 credits 

HI 203 European Society in the Middle Ages 

The social history of Europe from the agricultural revolution of 
the 1 1th century until the end of the Hundred Years War. From 
feudalism and the concept of courtly love, to the bitter power 
struggles of popes and monarchs. emphasis will be on the 
emerging institutions - secular and religious - which came 
both to define Western Europe in this and subsequent ages, 
and to provide its most enduring rifts and hatreds. The role of 
women in medieval society, the persecution of Jews and other 
minorities, the Crusades, and the Black Death are considered 
in depth, with particular focus on their impact on the lives of 
average Europeans. Readings from primary and secondary 
sources. 3 credits 



52 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



HI 211 Modern Germany I 

The long road to Hitler begins. The tragic duality of German 
history — saviors and savages, soldiers and artists. Luther's 
break with Rome creates the neversolved problem of one 
Germany or two. The Hapsburg and Hohenzollern struggle for 
leadership pits universalism against nationalism. Germany 
embraces and then rejects the Enlightenment. The impact of 
the French Revolution and Napoleon forces the Germans into 
a united effort which, after the disastrous Revolutions of 1 848, 
is crystallized into a national state by Bismarck. The Second 
Reich is born as a militarist, newly industrialized Germany. 

3 credits 

HI 212 Modem Germany II 

A united Germany achieves world-power status and becomes 
an industrial and imperial leader. William II stumbles into World 
War I. The Versailles Treaty dooms Germany's Weimar experi- 
ment with democracy. The events that led to Hitler. The Third 
Reich —dreams, doom, and damnation. The Holocaust and its 
heritage — World War 1 1 and another defeat. The two post-war 
Germanies — problems and divergence. The turbulent road to 
unification, problems for the future, rise of the new right. 

3 credits 

HI 215 Ireland from the Middle Ages to Present 

This course examines political, religious, economic, and social 
developments in the Irish island from early medieval times to the 
present day. Topics include Celtic culture and civilization, the 
coming of Christianity, the Viking and Norman invasions, the 
English conquests in the 16th and 17th centuries, the 18th- 
century Protestant Ascendancy, the subsequent struggle for 
Catholic Emancipation and Home Rule, the Potato Famine of 
1845-50, the struggle for independence during the early twen- 
tieth century, the ultimate establishment of the Irish republic, 
the current problems in Northern Ireland, and the historical ties 
between Ireland and the United States. 3 credits 

HI 216 Rise of the British Empire 

This course examines British overseas expansion between 
1500 and 1815: the Tudor-Stuart conquest of Ireland, the 
establishment of the North American colonies and West Indian 
plantations, the growth of British power in India during the 18th 
century, and the early phases of British rule in Canada, Austra- 
lia, and South Africa. The causes and effects of imperial 
expansion are studied from the standpoints of British political 
development, British society, the English-speaking colonists, 
and the native peoples of the empire. 3 credits 

HI 217 Britain and its Empire since 1800 

Continues the examination of the British empire, from its great 
19th-century expansion into Africa and Asia to its eventual 
crumbling under the impact of 20th-century independence 
movements and global war. Students compare the various 
independence movements, from the relatively peaceful transi- 
tions of Canada and Australia to the more violent ones by 
Ireland, South Africa, and India. The course finishes with an 
examination of the current racial and cultural conflicts that 
beset Britain's former colonies, with particular focus upon 
Ireland and South Africa. 3 credits 



History 

HI 218 The Renaissance and Reformation 

The invention of the individual in the Italian Renaissance, and 
further developments by the great Northern Humanists 
(Petrarch, Boccaccio, Castiglione, Erasmus, Montaigne, 
Cervantes). Visions of society and the realities (Dante, Marsiglio 
of Padua, Machiavelli, More, Rabelais). God and Man (Erasmus, 
Luther, Calvin, Trent, the Jesuits, the Radicals). The Expanded 
Universe: the discovery of America and the new astronomy. 

3 credits 

HI 230 Early Modern France: Passion, Politics, 
and the Making of National Identity 

The political, social, and cultural development of France from 
the 1 6th century Wars of Religion to the ascension of Napoleon 
I in 1 804. Emphasis is on the effects of revolutionary change on 
daily life (including the role of women, popular piety, the church 
and religious dissent, and labor relations); and on the impact of 
new political languages beyond the borders of France itself. 
Source readings from the salon writings of the Bourbon court, 
to the raucous songs of the streets of Paris aid in considering 
if a "French identity" was formed during the period. 3 credits 

HI 232 Jefferson's America: 1760-1850 

This course covers material from the coming of the American 
Revolution through the Age of Jackson, including the Constitu- 
tional Convention, the Federalist era, Jeffersonian republican- 
ism, and Jacksonian democracy. Emphasis is on the develop- 
ment of political parties in this era of alternating cohesion and 
division. Special attention is focused on the religious and 
reform movements of the antebellum period, including 
Shakerism, Transcendentalism, Mormonism, Abolitionism and 
Feminism. The role of "outsiders" - Africans free and slave, 
women, and American Indians - is stressed. 3 credits 

HI 238 United States, 1850-1900 

A study of the major transformations in the U.S. economy, society 
and politics from the decade of the crisis which led to the Civil War 
until the beginning of the Progressive Era. Forces of change in the 
U.S. —urbanization, industrialization, the maturation of corporate 
capitalism, and the growing importance of international affairs — 
are analyzed, as are their effects on the way people lived, thought, 
and acted. Special attention is given to the experiences of African- 
Americans, immigrants, and women. 3 credits 

HI 239 Twentieth-Century U.S. 

Course surveys development in American social, political, and 
economic life since 1900. Major themes include problems of 
advanced industrial society, the growing government role in the 
economy, America's growing role in the world, and social move- 
ments of the 1930s and 1960s. Attention is given to ethnic and 
cultural diversity within American society. 3 credits 

HI 243 American Constitutional and Legal History I, 
1776-1900 

This course covers the origins of the American constitutional 
tradition, the manifold heritage of the American Revolution, 
Jeffersonian republicanism and federal judicial power, nation- 
alism and the centralization of the Marshall court, the reaction 
on the Taney court, slavery and sectionalism, the Civil War, 
Reconstruction, the Second American Constitution, and the 
Gilded Age turn in American law. 3 credits 



History 

HI 244 American Constitutional and 
Legal History II, 1900-Present 

This course examines the latter portion of the Fuller court, 
Imperialism and the Constitution, governmental efforts to re- 
store economic competition, the police power, economic re- 
form, Progressivism, the tradition of national supremacy, new 
turns in civil liberties, the New Deal and the old supreme Court, 
civil rights and the incorporation theory of the 1 4 th amendment, 
and new roads back to legal conservatism. 3 credits 

HI 245 Feminism in America 

We study feminism based on the premise that it is a multi- 
faceted struggle for women's autonomy and self-determina- 
tion. The focus is largely confined to the United States, birth- 
place of the first organized women's movement. Periodically, 
we expand our view beyond the U.S. for purposes of compari- 
son. During the 19th and 20th centuries, we analyze the 
development of the feminist movement as well as feminist 
theory. We explore the discourse on gender mediated by race 
and class and its impact on women's lives. Using primary and 
secondary sources, we work towards a historical definition of 
feminism, (formerly listed as HI 143) 3 credits 

HI 246 Excellent Women, Deviant Women: 
The Female Experience 

This course is a survey of American women's history from the 
colonial era to the present. Our purpose is to explore the impact 
as well as the interdependence of gender, race and class on 
experience. Although the term social history describes our 
approach, we use biography to illuminate key issues and 
enrich our perspective. Through careful examination of pri- 
mary and secondary sources, we pursue two themes: 1) the 
interplay of gender constructs through the myths and realities 
of women's lives 2) the crucial role women played in transform- 
ing public and private space. We see women as agents whose 
testimony and actions are vital to understanding our history, 
(formerly listed as HI 142) 3 credits 

HI 250 America Enters the World: 

United States Foreign Relations, 1763-1900 

Explores the foundation of U.S. Foreign Relations from Indepen- 
dence in 1 776 to the outbreak of World War I in 1 91 4. This course 
looks closely at the interrelationship between ideals and reality as 
the new United States struggled to protect and confirm its inde- 
pendence, establish a Constitutional basis for foreign policy, and 
expand its borders and influence across the North American 
continent and around the world. Discusses such questions as 
Manifest Destiny, the Monroe Doctrine, the Mexican War. the 
displacement of Native Americans, southern expansionism and 
the Civil War, the Spanish American War, and the Open Door 
Policy as the United States became a world power on the eve of 
World War I. 3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



53 



HI 251 The American Century: 
The U.S. and the World since 1 900 

Examines the development, crises, and turning points in U.S. 
relations with the world from Woodrow Wilson to the present. 
Explores issues such as U.S. reactions to the Russian Revo- 
lution. World War I, isolationism and the coming of World War 
II. the Grand Alliance, the origins and development of the Cold 
War, the Nuclear Arms Race, the Vietnam War. the United 
States and Latin America, U.S. -Soviet Relations, the Middle 
East and Persian Gulf crises. 3 credits 

HI 253 Colonial America, 1584-1760 

A study of the foundations of American civilization. The colonial 
systems of Spain, France, and England are compared. The 
course stresses the development of the British colonies in New 
England, the mid-Atlantic, and the South. Special emphasis is 
on such topics as Puritanism, the Great Awakening, and the 
Enlightenment in America. An exploration of Indian-white 
relations and the development of white attitudes towards 
blacks is included. 3 credits 

HI 260 The Indian in American History 

After a broad survey of prehistoric Indian cultures in North 
America as they existed before contact with Europeans, this 
course focuses upon European contact and its effects on 
Native American culture. The Indian's role in the colonial 
period of eastern North American history is explored as are the 
ways in which Indian societies west of the Mississippi River 
responded to U.S. expansion in the 1 9th century and to that of 
the Spanish earlier. The evolution of federal Indian policy from 
the American Revolution to the late twentieth century is a major 
topic. 3 credits 

HI 263 Inventing Themselves: 

African-American Women in U.S. History 

At the intersection of race, gender and class. African-American 
women often challenged the codification of blackness and 
femaleness as well as a limited conception of class conscious- 
ness. From the diaspora to the present, they created forms of 
resistance, devised survival strategies and transmitted cultural 
knowledge while defying racial/gendered stereotypes. The 
multiple roles assumed by Black women during their struggle 
from slaves to citizens in the U.S. represent a complex study of 
the relational nature of difference and identity. This course 
focuses on African-American women as subjects and agents of 
pivotal importance within the family, community and labor 
force. 3 credits 

HI 275 Russia's Road to Revolution, 1689-1917 

The modernization of Russia since Peter the Great: the impact 
of Western culture in the 18th century: Catherine the Great as 
reformer; intellectual protest against autocracy and serfdom; 
revolutionary ferment: Slavophiles and Westerners: from popu- 
lism to Marxism-Leninism; the revolution of 1905: the industri- 
alization of Russia to 1914; the revolutions of 1917. 

3 credits 



54 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



History 



HI 280 The West and the Middle East 

An examination of Western and Middle Eastern relations from 
the 18th century to the present. An effort is made to relate 
recurring upheavals of the Middle East, including conflicts 
between ethnic-religious groups and economic classes, to 
structural transformations that have developed over two cen- 
turies. Topics include: Western colonization and conquest; 
Middle Eastern nationalism; the Arab-Israeli conflict; the eco- 
nomics and politics of oil; the Islamic revival. 3 credits 

HI 282 Social and Cultural History 
of China and Japan 

Examines the traditional institutions of the classical and imperial 
ages of China and Japan to c. 1800. Topics include: the 
Confucian basis of society, state, and education, the diffusion 
of Sinic culture among China's neighbors, arts and aesthetics, 
Japanese feudalism and the samurai tradition, early western 
contacts with China and Japan. 3 credits 

HI 283 China, Japan, and the West, 1600-Present 

A study of the transformation of traditional civilizations of East 
Asia since 1 800. Topics include the impact of the West and the 
opening of China and Japan, Japan's Meiji reform and rise to a 
world power, imperialist rivalry in China, and Nationalism and 
Communism in the 20th century. 3 credits 

HI 284 Twentieth Century Russia 

This course covers such major themes as the impact of the 
1 905 and 1 91 7 Revolutions; Lenin, War Communism, and the 
New Economic Policy; Stalin, Collectivization and the Great 
Purges; the Russian War Experience and the Cold War; 
Khrushchev, Reform, and DeStalinization; Brezhnev, stagna- 
tion and detente; Gorbachev, giasnost, perestroika, and 
political and economic crisis; the Revolution of 1989-1991; 
post-Soviet Russia, (formerly HI 384) 3 credits 

HI 288 Colonial Latin America, 1492-1800 

Indian cultures, Portuguese and Spanish institutions and val- 
ues on the eve of the conquests. The clash of cultures and 
interests and three ensuing centuries of New World dialectics: 
conquistadores, viceroys, colonists, priests, friars, Indian ca- 
ciques and peasants, black slaves, free mulattoes mutually 
interacting and forming, by 1800, a new civilization composed 
of varying hybrid cultures from the Rio Grande to Tierra del 
Fuego. The Iberian colonies on the eve of the 19th century 
revolutions for independence. 3 credits 

HI 289 Latin America in Revolution, 1800-present 

The successful overthrow of the Colonial establishment 1808- 
1826, and two centuries of ensuing political, economic, social 
and cultural instability and the search for a viable social order. 
Emphasis is placed on the elusive search for reform in the 20th 
century, an age of revolution, counter-revolution, and persistent 
oligarchies. The failure of the revolutionary experience in Mexico, 
Chile and Nicaragua, the current ascendancy of neo-liberalism 
and the great cultural achievements of the 20th century are given 
special consideration. 3 credits 



Advanced Courses, 300-399 



All advanced courses require HI 30 and one intermedi- 
ate course. 

HI 316 The French Revolution and Napoleon 

The course deals with the causes of the Revolution, the move 
from moderate to radical change, the dynamics of the Terror, 
the roots of counterrevolution, and the reaction that led to 
military dictatorship; it also analyzes Napoleon's career, the 
basis of his empire and its relationship to the satellite king- 
doms, and the effects of French hegemony upon Europe. 

3 credits 

HI 317 Religious Outsiders in 
Early Modern France and Europe 

The role of religious minorities, including Protestants, Jews, 
and Catholic splinter groups is explored from 1492 to the 
French Revolution, with emphasis on the political and social 
aspects of each group's existence. Images of religious minori- 
ties, and forms of oppression and persecution, are examined 
in orderto determine the boundaries of authority and the nature 
of belonging in European society, and how they were changing 
during this period. Primary and secondary sources are used. 

3 credits 

HI 323 Tudor-Stuart Britain, 1485-1714 

This course examines the changes in church, state, and 
society that took place in the British Isles from the accession of 
Henry VII to the death of Queen Anne. These centuries saw the 
unification of England, Ireland, and Scotland under a single 
government, the development of that government from feudal 
kingship into Parliamentary-based bureaucracy, and the shat- 
tering of medieval Catholicism into a variety of different churches 
and doctrines. The course also examines the structure of 
Tudor-Stuart society, and the cultural changes resulting from 
the Renaissance and the Scientific Revolution. 3 credits 

HI 354 American Military History 

Through a study of America's wars from the 17th century to 
Vietnam we examine the role of the military in a democratic 
society and its effects on our nation's political, economic, 
social, cultural and environmental institutions. We analyze the 
changing nature of warfare through strategy and tactics, logis- 
tics, technology and weaponry. Geopolitics, the military-indus- 
trial complex, wars of national liberation, and counterinsurgency 
are topics of investigation. 3 credits 

HI 355 The United States in World War II 

An investigation of the origins of World War II from the failures 
of the World War I peace settlements, the League of Nations, 
and Collective Security to the eruption of war in Europe and the 
Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The important diplomacy of 
the war-time alliance, the major Theatres of War and the 
military campaigns of Europe, Russia, North Africa and the 
Mediterranean, Asia and the Pacific, the use of the Atomic 
Bomb and the failure to make a satisfactory peace are studied. 

3 credits 



History 

HI 363 China in Revolution 

We begin our study with the 1 9th century imperialist legacy that 
gave rise to Chinese nationalism and the Chinese revolution of 
1911. Major topics include Sun Yat-sen's vision for China, the 
struggle between the Nationalists and Communists for control 
of China, the impact of Japanese imperialism and World War 
II, and the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1 949. 
The PRC's domestic and foreign policies are analyzed through 
the "Great Leap Forward," the thought of Chairman Mao, the 
Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, the Sino-Soviet bloc 
relations, Korea, Vietnam, and the "two Chinas issue" with the 
United States. 3 credits 

HI 371 Arab-Israeli Conflict 

The course traces the Arab-Israeli Conflict from the end of the 
19th century until the present. Emphasis is placed upon the 
political and socio-economic transformation of Palestine as 
Zionists and Palestinian Arabs struggled for political sover- 
eignty in the same land. Topics include: Anti-Semitism and the 
Birth of Zionism; the British Mandate; the Creation of Israel; the 
Relationship between Israel and the Arab States; the Israeli 
occupation of the West Bank and Gaza; the Rise of the 
Palestinian Resistance: Israel's War in Lebanon; Prospects for 
the Future. 3 credits 

HI 399 Independent Study 

Open to seniors only. A course designed to provide an oppor- 
tunity for advanced students to develop critical reading skills 
and writing ability in a tutorial arrangement with a chosen 
professor. Normally, the course results in a serious paper of 
publishable quality in student-centered journals (1 5-20 pages). 

Students must apply to a professor under whose direction they 
wish to study during the normal registration time of the preced- 
ing semester. All independent study must have the concur- 
rence of the Department chairperson. 3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



55 



Mathematics and Computer Science 



Acting Department Chair: Matthew Coleman. Ph.D. 



The major in Computer Science is described under its 
own heading. 



Major in Mathematics 

Major in mathematics: The mathematics major at Fair- 
field is designed to give the student as strong and as 
wide a background in undergraduate mathematics as 
possible. This major provides the foundation for further 
graduate studies in theoretical or applied fields of math- 
ematics. 

Graphing calculators and computer software are inte- 
grated as much as possible in the mathematics curricu- 
lum. Mathematics majors are required to have a graph- 
ing calculator at least as powerful as a TI-83. 

All mathematics majors will take a comprehensive ex- 
amination in their senior year. A grade of Passed with 
Distinction. Passed, or Failed will be recorded on the 
transcript. 

Majors in mathematics must complete 3 credits of a 
high level computer programming language, such as 
Pascal, C, or FORTRAN by the end of their junior year. 
Students who can demonstrate proficiency in one of 
these languages may have this requirement waived by 
the Department Chair. 

Although physics is the usual science taken by majors 
in mathematics or computer science, a different labo- 
ratory science may be substituted with permission of 
the Chair. 

Students who wish to double major in mathematics 
and a science are encouraged to meet with the chairs 
of the respective departments so that appropriate 
modifications to the requirements can be made. 



56 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Bachelor of Science 

Mathematics 

Fairfield 

University Transfer 
Math/Science Core: 

MA 171 Differential Calculus □ □ 

MA 172 Integral Calculus □ □ 

2 semesters Lab Science B D 
Major: 

MA 271 Multivariate Cal. I □ B 

MA 272 Multivariable Cal. II □ □ 

MA 231 Discrete Math. O □ 

MA 235 Linear Algebra □ □ 

MA 334 Abstract Algebra □ □ 

MA 371 Real Analysis □ □ 
6 electives 

1. Programming Languages D B 

2. □ □ 

3 a □ 

4 a □ 

5 a a 

6 □ a 

General Electives (8) 



Bachelor of Science 

Major in Mathematics with a 
concentration in Computer Science 

Fairfield 

University Transfer 
Math/Science Core: 

MA 171 Differential Calculus □ □ 

MA 172 Integral Calculus □ D 

2 semesters Lab Science □ □ 
Major: 

MA 271 Multivariable Cal. I □ □ 

MA 272 Multivariable Cal. II □ □ 

MA 231 Discrete Math. B B 

MA 235 Linear Algebra □ □ 

MA 334 Abstract Algebra □ □ 

MA 371 Real Analysis □ □ 

MA Elective (Theor.) D B 

MA Compreh. Exam B B 

CS 131 Computer Prog. I □ B 

CS 132 Computer Prog. II □ □ 
CS 221 Computer Organ. 

and Assembly □ □ 

CS 232 Data Structures □ □ 

CS 342, 343 or MA elective □ □ 

CS 354 Theo. of Prog. Lang. □ B 

CS/MA 377 Num. Analysis □ D 

General Electives (5) 

NOTE: Advanced courses for the mathematics 
major are offered daytime only. 



Mathematics 

Mathematics Courses for Non-Majors 

MA 10 Mathematics for Liberal Arts 

(offered in School of Continuing Education only) 

Major mathematical concepts are presented in an historical and 
cultural setting. Topics include geometry, set theory logic, differ- 
ential, and integral calculus. The interplay between mathemat- 
ics, philosophy, and the arts is explored in addition to the more 
traditional relationship between mathematics and the physical 
sciences. Mathematics is treated as an art for its aesthetic 
beauty as well as a science. The course is oriented to giving a 
mathematician's view of the subject rather than preparing a 
student for a specific application of mathematics. 3 credits 



The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education 

MA 17 Introduction to Probability and Statistics 

An introduction to the theory of statistics. Course includes 
measures of central tendency, variance, Chebyshev's theorem, 
probability theory, binomial distribution, normal distribution, the 
central limit theorem, and estimating population means for large 
samples. 3 credits 

MA 19 Introduction to Calculus 

This course introduces differentiation and integration and shows 
how these ideas are related. The focus in on illustrating how a 
huge array of important and interesting questions in geometry, 
applications and life, when expressed in the language of func- 
tions, turn out to be questions about derivatives and integrals, 
and are amenable to the same body of techniques and universal 
principles. The basic concepts are introduced numerically, alge- 
braically and geometrically with graphing calculators being used 
to illustrate many of the underlying geometrical ideas. 

3 credits 

MA 27 Intermediate Business Statistics 

This course is intended for students who have taken both MA 
17 and MA 19. It covers the tools and techniques of statistics 
most commonly seen in business applications. It is intended as 
a course to meet the third semester of the Business School's 
quantitative requirement. (Students who have had MA 121/1 22 
or 171/172 should take MA 217.) Topics include (multi)linear 
regression and correlation, inference, including t-tests, and 
chi-square tests, and analysis of variation (ANOVA). (Prereq- 
uisites: MA 1 7, MA 1 9) 3 credits 

MA 121 & 122 Applied Calculus I & II 

MA 121: Plane analytic geometry; foundations of the calculus; 
differentiation of algebraic functions; extrema and curve sketch- 
ing; applications of derivatives, 
(formerly listed as MA 21 ) 3 credits 

MA 122: Antiderivatives; the Fundamental Theorem of Calcu- 
lus; differentiation and integration of trigonometric, logarithmic, 
and exponential functions; techniques of integration; applica- 
tions of the definite integral. (Prerequisite: MA 121 or equiva- 
lent.) 
(formerly listed as MA 22) 3 credits 



Mathematics 

MA 125 & 126 Calculus I & II: 
Engineering and Physics Majors 

MA 125: Analytic geometry, continuous functions, derivatives 
of algebraic and trigonometric functions, product and chain 
rules, implicit functions, extrema and curve sketching, indefi- 
nite and definite integrals, applications of derivatives and of 
antiderivatives. 
(formerly listed as MA 25) 3 credits 

MA 126: Exponential and logarithmic transcendental func- 
tions, their derivatives and their integrals: The Fundamental 
Theorem of Calculus; applications to area, arc length and 
volumes of revolution; hyperbolic functions, inverse trig func- 
tions; methods of integration, by substitution and parts; inde- 
terminate forms and improper integrals. (Prerequisite: MA 1 25 
or equivalent.) 
(formerly listed as MA 26) 3 credits 

MA 225 Applied Calculus III 

Partial differentiation, multiple integrals, infinite series, and 
first order differential equations. (Prerequisites: MA 121-122.) 

3 credits 

MA 227 Calculus III: 

Engineering and Physics Majors 

Infinite series, tests for convergence, power series, Taylor 
series; geometry in 3-space; partial differentiation of continu- 
ous functions; chain rule, exact differentials, maxima and 
minima; multiple integration; application to volumes, center of 
gravity; polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. (Prerequi- 
site: MA 126 or equivalent.) 3 credits 

MA 228 Calculus IV: 

Engineering and Physics Majors 

Vector arithmetic and algebra, dot and cross products, para- 
metric equations, lines and planes; gradient, directional de- 
rivative, curl, divergence; line integrals, work, Green's theo- 
rem, surface integrals; stokes and divergence theorems. (Pre- 
requisite: MA 227 or equivalent.) 3 credits 

MA 321 Ordinary Differential Equations 

Solutions of first and second order differential equations by 
formal methods. Linear equations are studied in detail. Sys- 
tems of equations. Series solutions. Applications to geometry 
and physics. (Prerequisite: MA 225 or the equivalent.) 

3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



57 



Modern Languages and Literatures 



Department Chair: Robert Webster, Ph.D. 



The study of modern foreign languages, as well as their 
cultures and literatures in the original, is an intellectual 
experience that offers the student another point of view 
on life. Knowledge of a language other than English is 
freedom from the restraints of seeing but one reality, and 
the new perspectives that are gained from understand- 
ing the expression of another people are the essence of 
a liberal education. 

The Department of Modern Languages and Literatures 
stresses proficiency in all language skills in order to 
prepare students for careers in business, communica- 
tion, education, government, health sciences, social 
work, and related professions. 

The department offers instruction in the following lan- 
guages: Chinese, French, German, Hebrew. Italian. 
Japanese, Russian and Spanish. Currently, majors and 
minors are available in French, German and Spanish. 

The 300-level courses are conducted in the language 
and students are encouraged to consult with a member 
of the Department when selecting them. 

Students should consult with the department chair for 
major course requirements. 




58 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs Modern Languages and Literatures 



Modern Languages and Literatures 

24 Credits in language of concentration at 200 or 
300 level. 



Literature 

1 

2 

3 

4 



Fairfield 
University 

a 

D 

n 
a 



Composition 
1 



Conversation 
1 



Culture 
1 



Language Elective 
1 



Free Electives 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9. 

10 

11 

12. 



Transfer 

□ 
a 
a 
a 

n 

n 

□ 



NOTE: Advanced language courses are available 
daytime only. 



The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education 



Chinese 

C1 11-12 Basic Chinese 

The goal of this two-semester sequence is to teach the essen- 
tials of pronunciation, structure, and usage in order for stu- 
dents to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing. Three/Four classes per week, as determined by the 
Department, and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper 
Language Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

4 credits each 

C1 101-102 Intermediate Chinese 

In this two-semester sequence, the structure and current 
usage of the Chinese language are reviewed and practiced to 
improve the student's ability to speak and to write as well as to 
read literary and cultural selections. Three classes per week 
and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper Language 
Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

4 credits each 



French 

FR 11-12 Basic French 

The goal of this two-semester sequence is to teach the essen- 
tials of pronunciation, structure, and usage in order for stu- 
dents to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing. Three/Four classes per week, as determined by the 
Department, and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper 
Language Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

4 credits each 

FR 49-50 Basic French Review 

This two-semester sequence is intended for students who 
have studied French for one or two years in secondary school 
but who are not prepared to take FR 101-102. Students build 
their communicative competency in the four skills, review and 
apply grammar to real-life situations, use tutorial and/or tech- 
nological assistance extensively. Final oral proficiency of at 
least Novice High on the ACTFL/ETS scale is expected. 
Students who complete FR 49-50 must then take FR 101-102 
in order to satisfy the core language requirement. Students 
must obtain written permission from the instructor or the 
Departmental chair in order to enroll in this class. 

3 credits each 

FR 101-102 Intermediate French 

In this two-semester sequence, the structure and current 
usage of the French language are reviewed and practiced to 
improve the student's ability to speak and to write as well as to 
read literary and cultural selections. Three classes per week 
and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper Language 
Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

3 credits each 



Modern Languages and Literatures Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



59 



German 

GM 11-12 Basic German 

The goal of this two-semester sequence is to teach the essen- 
tials of pronunciation, structure, and usage in order for stu- 
dents to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing. Three/Four classes per week, as determined by the 
Department, and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper 
Language Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

4 credits each 



Hebrew 

HE 11-12 Basic Hebrew 

The goal of this two-semester sequence is to teach the essen- 
tials of pronunciation, structure, and usage in order for stu- 
dents to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing. Three/Four classes per week, as determined by the 
Department, and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper 
Language Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

4 credits each 

HE 101-102 Intermediate Hebrew 

In this two-semester sequence, the structure and current 
usage of the Hebrew language are reviewed and practiced to 
improve the student's ability to speak and to write as well as to 
read literary and cultural selections. Three classes per week 
and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper Language 
Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

3 credits each 



Italian 

IT 11-12 Basic Italian 

The goal of this two-semester sequence is to teach the essen- 
tials of pronunciation, structure, and usage in order for stu- 
dents to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing. Three/Four classes per week, as determined by the 
Department, and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper 
Language Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

4 credits each 

IT 101-102 Intermediate Italian 

In this two-semester sequence, the structure and current 
usage of the Italian language are reviewed and practiced to 
improve the student's ability to speak and to write as well as 
read literary and cultural selections. Three classes per week 
and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper Language 
Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

3 credits each 



Japanese 



JA 11-12 Basic Japanese 

The goal of this two-semester sequence is to teach the essen- 
tials of pronunciation, structure, and usage in order for stu- 
dents to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing. Three/Four classes per week, as determined by the 
Department, and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper 
Language Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

4 credits each 

JA 101-102 Intermediate Japanese 

In this two-semester sequence, the structure and current 
usage of the Japanese language are reviewed and practiced to 
improve the student's ability to speak and to write as well as 
read literary and cultural selections. Three classes per week 
and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper Language 
Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

4 credits each 

Russian 

RU 11-12 Basic Russian 

The goal of this two-semester sequence is to teach the essen- 
tials of pronunciation, structure, and usage in order for stu- 
dents to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing. Three/Four classes per week, as determined by the 
Department, and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper 
Language Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

4 credits each 

RU 101-102 Intermediate Russian 

In this two-semester sequence, the structure and current 
usage of the Russian language are reviewed and practiced to 
improve the student's ability to speak and to write as well as 
read literary and cultural selections. Three classes per week 
and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper Language 
Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

4 credits each 



Spanish 

SP 11-12 Basic Spanish 

The goal of this two-semester sequence is to teach the essen- 
tials of pronunciation, structure, and usage in order for stu- 
dents to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing. Three/Four classes per week, as determined by the 
Department, and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper 
Language Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

4 credits each 

SP 101-102 Intermediate Spanish 

In this two-semester sequence, the structure and current 
usage of the Spanish language are reviewed and practiced to 
improve the student's ability to speak and to write as well as 
read literary and cultural selections. Three classes per week 
and utilization of ancillary materials in the Culpeper Language 
Resource Center, as determined by the instructor. 

3 credits each 



60 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Philosophy 



Philosophy 



Acting Chair: R. James Long. Ph.D. 



Philosophy is a quest for truth, for ultimate values. The 
objective of our program, then, is to develop in the 
student a philosophic habit of mind by which he or she 
seeks to discover these values. We feel that the quest 
and the values are interdependent; the mind feeds on 
value, but values do not submit themselves except 
through critical evaluation of one's experience. Although 
there is no one prescribed methodology by which this 
critical attitude is developed, the emphasis in our pro- 
gram is placed on a blend of the thematic and the 
historical. Only in the light of their evolution and cultural 
context can values be thoroughly understood. 

Philosophy is delimited and defined today by three 
major schools: analytic philosophy, existentialism and 
phenomenology, and speculative or traditional philoso- 
phy. Each tradition is represented in Fairfield University's 
philosophy program. This variety of perspectives gives 
a broad outlook to the student. The rigor of the program 
develops confidence and skill within the student. 




V-\ 



Philosophy 



Fairfield 

University Transfer 
Core: Ph 10 3 3 

Modern Philosophy (PH 100-199) 
1 3 3 



Major Philosophies 

1 

2 



Logic 

1 



*PH Electives (5 Courses) 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 



General Electives (10 Courses) 



1.. 
2.- 
3.- 
4.- 
5.- 
6.- 
7.. 
8.- 
9.- 
10. 
11. 



'Courses in Applied Ethics can be used to satisfy 
this requirement. 



Philosophy 

The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education. 

PH 10 Introduction to Philosophy: 
Ancient and Medieval 

The aim of this course is to introduce the student to great 
philosophers of the classical and medieval periods, and through 
them to the discipline of philosophy in general. 3 credits 



Modern Options 

All courses numbered 150-161 require PH 10 as a 
prerequisite. 

PH 150 Modern Philosophy 

This course serves to introduce the student to the philosophy 
and methods of philosophers from the 17th century to the 
present through a study of the writings of such philosophers as 
Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Hume, Kant, Tocqueville, 
Nietzsche, and James. The readings focus on issues in meth- 
odology, epistemology, metaphysics, and politics. 3 credits 

PH 153 Existentialism and its Modern Background 

This course explores the basic themes and ideas of existential- 
ism by relating them to their background in European culture 
and philosophy. Special attention is given to the thoughts of 
Descartes, Pascal, Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, 
Heidegger, and Sartre. 3 credits 

PH 155 Philosophy of Science 

A survey of the philosophic background against which contem- 
porary discussions of philosophy of science must inevitably 
take place with emphasis on contemporary discussions of both 
natural and social science. Special attention is given to the 
"contextuality" of scientific knowledge. 3 credits 

PH156 Ethical Theory 

The course offers a general discussion of the nature of ethics 
or "moral philosophy" and a comparative study of the various 
schools of ethical theory. The course considers such themes 
as freedom, conscience, the nature of the good, and responsi- 
bility. 3 credits 



Electives 

All courses numbered 200-299 require PH 10 and a 
1 00-level philosophy course as prerequisites. 

PH 203 Logic 

This course is designed to provide a basic acquaintance with 
prevailing systems and methods of logic, notably traditional 
(Aristotelian) and modern (standard mathematical) logics. 

3 credits 

PH 206 20th Century Philosophy 

This course presents a coherent picture of the main currents of 
contemporary philosophy in both the Western and the non- 
Western tradition: Phenomenology and Existentialism. Prag- 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



61 



matism and Analytic Philosophy. Marxism and Dialectic Mate- 
rialism, and Philosophy of History and Culture. 3 credits 

PH 207 Aesthetics 

A study of aesthetic experience and an examination of con- 
cepts like imitation, expression, and psychic distance; a con- 
sideration of the relationships among the various arts, and an 
exploration of the role of art in life. 3 credits 

PH 209 Augustine, Pascal, and Camus 

This course takes as its focus the rich and enduring philosophi- 
cal synthesis of the Bishop of Hippo as compared with two of 
his modern/contemporary disciples, Blaise Pascal and Albert 
Camus. These three thinkers came from three very different 
eras, and these differences should not be minimized. There is, 
however, a common strain in their thinking, which should 
become evident in the course of our study. To put it in simplest 
terms, all three - Augustine. Pascal, and Camus - share a 
conviction that the affective part of the human person (or, in 
more traditional terminology, the will) is at least as important as 
the reason and often overrides it (as in Pascal's famous dictum: 
The heart has its reasons which reason knows nothing of). It 
was, in fact, Augustine who first emphasized the importance of 
the will and of the will-act. which is love, and his powerful 
message impacted not only on Christian thinkers (like Pascal), 
but also on unbelievers (like Camus). Pascal found Augustim- 
anism a welcome refuge from what he considered the exces- 
sive rationalism of Descartes, and Camus, who wrote his 
dissertation on Plotinus, discovered a resonance between 
Augustinian Neoplatonism and the movement that eventually 
became known as existentialism. 3 credits 

PH211 Epistemology 

What is the difference between knowledge and mere belief or 
opinion? What do we really know, and how do we know it 9 
Epistemology— the study of knowledge— is the branch of phi- 
losophy concerned with such questions. The course explores 
epistemological issues through an examination of some of the 
important contributions to the field. 3 credits 

PH212 Political Philosophy: 
Plato to Machiavelli 

This course considers the evolution of political thinking from 
the Golden Age of Athenian democracy to the dawn of the 
modern period. It takes as its focus the changing views of the 
body politic from Plato through Augustine. Thomas Aquinas 
and Marsilius, to Renaissance thinkers like More and 
Machiavelli. 3 credits 

PH214 The Problem of God 

This course studies the problem of the existence of God. 
including the metaphysical and epistemological issues en- 
tailed therein, as developed by such thinkers as Augustine. 
Anselm. Aquinas. Descartes. Kant, Kierkegaard, and James. 

3 credits 

PH 215 Metaphysics 

This course concerns itself with being as being and our knowl- 
edge of being: its aim is to develop in the student's mind an 
operative habit of viewing reality in its ultimate context. 

3 credits 



62 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Philosophy 



PH 217 Mysticism and Western Philosophy 

This course studies and compares the sometimes conflicting, 
sometimes complementary traditions in the history of Western 
thought: the intellective and the affective or mystical. The one 
stresses the ability of the reason to know, even something of 
the divine; the other abandons the reason for the "one thing 
necessary." Among the philosophers to be read are Plotinus, 
Augustine, PseudoDionysius, Bernard, Bonaventure, Thomas 
d'Aquino, Eckhart, and Dante. 3 credits 

PH219 Aquinas 

This course focuses its attention on Aquinas' Summa Contra 
Gentiles, a work at once more philosophical and more personal 
than the later and better known Summa Theologiae. The SCG 
exemplifies the Christian intellectual reaction to Arabian 
Aristotelianism and at the same time bears witness to Thomas' 
belief in the unity of truth. Such questions as the existence and 
attributes of God, the nature and powers of the human compos- 
ite, immortality, the human act, good and evil, man's felicity, 
providence and freedom, natural law, and the virtues are 
examined and analyzed. 3 credits 

PH 233 Introduction to Oriental Philosophy 

A coherently developed account of the salient features of the 
two philosophical traditions of China and India as contrasted 
with each other and with the Western tradition. 3 credits 

PH 235 Immanuel Kant 

An inquiry into the major metaphysical, epistemological and 
ethical themes developed by this revolutionary and important 
German philosopher. The course includes a survey of the 
influences of Kant and his influence on subsequent philosophy. 

3 credits 

PH236 Plato 

This course is concerned with central ontological and episte- 
mological themes in selected early, middle, and late Platonic 
dialogues. Particular attention is given to Plato's inclination to 
identify virtue with knowledge. 3 credits 

PH 237 Aristotle 

An introduction to Aristotle through a selection of his works. An 
exploration of their relation to other works, their place in the 
scheme of the sciences, and a thorough investigation of their 
subject matter. 3 credits 

PH280 Heidegger 

This course explores the work of Martin Heidegger (1889- 
1 976), one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth 
century. The course primarily takes the form of a close reading 
of Being and Time (1927) and The Origin of the Work of Art 
(1936). The hinge around which the course turns is Derrida's 
reading of Heidegger's existential analysis of death. 3 credits 

PH 283 Ethical Theories in America 

This course is a study of the growth and development of ethical 
theory in America. America's first philosophers, Jonathan 
Edwards, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson et al, distin- 
guished their philosophies in terms of religious, political, and 
social values. This ethical stance became a tradition in America. 




4 






This tradition is examined in the writings of representative 
American philosophers. 3 credits 

PH 294 American Philosophy 

The origin and development of the American philosophical 
tradition and its culmination in Pragmatism. The relation of 
philosophical ideas in America to literature, religion, and poli- 
tics. Major emphasis is given to the writings of Jonathan 
Edwards, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Charles Sanders Peirce, 
William James, and John Dewey. 3 credits 

PH295 19th Century Philosophy 

This course is a study of the representative philosophers of the 
19th century — notably Kant, Fichte, Schelling, Hegel, 
Schleiermacher, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, and 
Marx. 3 credits 

PH 297 Evil 

This course explores the problem of evil from the perspectives 
of theology and philosophy. The course considers God and 
evil, classical theodicies (reasonable justifications of God 
before the prevalence of evil), modern philosophical accounts 
of evil, social evil, and the possibility of belief in the face of evil. 
Within the context of these subjects, the course addresses the 
following questions: What is evil? What are the roots of evil? 
What effect does one's understanding of evil have on one's 
understanding of the human being, of God, and of religion? 
What is our responsibility in the face of evil? 3 credit 



Physics 



Physics 



Department Chair: Jack W. Beal, Ph.D. 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 

Bachelor of Science 

Major in Physics 

48 credits 



The Department of Physics offers programs in physics 
and in engineering. 

The science of physics is concerned principally with the 
physical laws that determine the nature and interactions 
of matter and energy and underlie all physical phenom- 
ena. It is the fundamental science for most branches of 
engineering and technology and has innumerable appli- 
cations in medicine, industry, and everyday life. 

The educational objectives of the Department of Phys- 
ics are: (1) to prepare the student for entrance into and 
successful completion of a graduate education in phys- 
ics or related fields; (2) to prepare the student for 
entrance into the technological as well as non-technical 
work force. 

In order to accomplish these objectives: physics and 
engineering students are guided to an understanding of 
physical laws and their applications; students are trained 
to think logically and develop their problem-solving 
ability; they will develop experimental skills and become 
knowledgeable in the use of instrumentation; and they 
will be instructed in advanced mathematics and in the 
use of computers and microprocessors. 

Physics and engineering students automatically earn a 
minor in mathematics. The more applied component of 
the physics curriculum focuses on laser technology, 
digital electronics, electro-optics, and materials science. 
Students learn the fundamental physical processes that 
constitute the basis of modern technology. As a result, 
physics graduates can either pursue graduate studies 
leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in any subfield of 
physics, or follow industrial careers in research and 
development in corporate or industrial environments, or 
professional careers in such fields as health physics, 
computer science, medicine, biostatistics, architecture, 
patent/high-tech law, science teaching, and others. 



PS 15 General Physics I 
PS 16 General Physics II 
PS 226 Theoretical Mech. 
PS 285 Modern Physics 
PS 211 Digital Electronics 
or 

PS 212 Circuit Analysis 
PS 271 Elec. and Magn. I 
PS 371 Elec. and Magn. II 
PS 222 Modern Optics and 

Wave Phenomena 
PS 203 Lab in 

Optics & Lasers 
PS 390 Special Topics 
PS 204 Lab in Modern 

Exper. Methods I 
PS 205 Lab in Modern 

Exper. Methods II 
PS 241 Thermodynamics 
PS 386 Quantum Physics 
PS 388 Elementary Particles 

& Nuclear Physics 
PS 391 Independent Study 
PS 392 Independent Study 



Fairfield 

University 

"J 

□ 

n 
n 

D 
D 

1 



63 



Transfer 
"I 

-) 

3 

1 

n 
□ 



NOTE: Advanced physic courses are offered day- 
time only. 



64 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education. 



PS 15 General Physics I 

This is an introductory physics course covering mechanics and 
heat for students whose field of concentration will be physics, 
mathematics, chemistry or engineering. Rigorous mathemati- 
cal derivations are used. Velocity and acceleration, Newton's 
Laws of Motion, work, energy, power momentum, torque, 
vibratory motion, elastic properties of solids, fluids at rest and 
in motion, properties of gases, measurement and transfer of 
heat, and elementary thermodynamics will be studied. 

3 credits 

PS 15L Laboratory for General Physics I 

This laboratory course engages the students in experimental 
measurements spanning the areas of mechanics and thermal 
stresses on matter. Its objectives are to train students in 
experimental measurements, data manipulation and analysis, 
error analysis, deductive thinking, and instrumentation. It pro- 
vides depth in the students' understanding of the phenomena 
taught in General Physics I. Specific experimental measure- 
ments include accelerated motion, periodic motion, the gravi- 
tational force, ballistics, conservation of energy and momen- 
tum and rotational dynamics; also, measurements of the coef- 
ficient of linear expansion and the heat of fusion. A weekly 
report is required. 1 credit 

PS 16 General Physics II 

This course is a continuation of PS 1 5, covering electricity and 
magnetism, and light and sound. Magnetism and electricity, 
simple electric circuits, electrical instruments, generators and 
motors, characteristics of wave motion, light and illumination, 
reflection, refraction, interference, and polarization of light, 
color, and the spectrum, and production and detection of sound 
waves will be studied. 3 credits 

PS 16L Laboratory for General Physics II 

This laboratory is designed to allow students a greater under- 
standing of electromagnetic phenomena, wave phenomena, 
and optics, in support of General Physics II. Measurements of 
microscopic quantities, like the charge and mass of the elec- 
tron, give the students an opportunity to explore the structure 
of matter. Other experiments involve the physics of electrical 
currents, electric properties of bulk matter, magnetic fields and 
their effect on beams, wave phenomena, the nature of light and 
its interaction with optical materials. In terms of experimental 
skills, this course shares the same objectives as PS 15L, i.e., 
measurement techniques, data and error analysis and instru- 
mentation. A weekly report is required. 1 credit 



Physics 

PS 71 Physics of Light and Color 

This course is intended for students who are not majoring in the 
physical sciences. The particle-wave duality of light is covered 
as is the relationship of light to other electromagnetic waves. 
Other topics discussed include polarization, vision, color and 
the perception of color, optical phenomena in nature, and in 
biological systems, color and light in art, simple optical instru- 
ments, sources of light and their spectra, lasers, and hologra- 
phy. 3 credits 

PS 83 General Physics for the 
Life and Health Sciences I 

This course covers mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, 
wave motion and sound; the fundamentals of each area are 
treated rigorously. Topics include velocity and acceleration. 
Newton's Laws of Motion, work, energy, power, momentum, 
torque, vibratory motion, and elastic properties of solids and 
properties of gases, transfer of heat, and elementary thermo- 
dynamics. 3 credits 



PS 83L Laboratory for General Physics 
for the Health and Life Sciences I 

Same as PS 15L 



1 credit 



PS 84 General Physics for the 
Life and Health Sciences II 

A continuation of PS 83, this course covers light, electricity and 
magnetism — a study of the nature of light, reflection, refrac- 
tion, diffraction, and polarization; electrostatics, DC circuits, 
magnetic forces, electromagnetic induction, AC circuits, elec- 
trical instruments, generators and motors. 3 credits 



PS 84L Laboratory for General Physics 
for the Health and Life Sciences II 

Same as PS 16L 



1 credit 



PS 87 Fundamentals of Astronomy 

This one-semester course introduces the student who is not 
majoring in science to the principal areas, traditional and 
contemporary, of astronomy. The traditional topics studied are: 
an historical background to astronomy, telescopes, the sun, 
the moon, the major and minor planets, comets, and meteors. 
After these subjects are discussed in detail, the areas appro- 
priate to modern astronomy are discussed. These topics in- 
clude: the composition and evolution of stars, star clusters, 
quasars, pulsars, black holes, and cosmological models. 

3 credits 

PS 93 Energy and the Environment 

This course is designed to introduce students not majoring in 
the natural sciences to topics relating to work, energy, and 
power. Many of the environmental consequences resulting 
from our use of energy are explored. The finite nature of our 
fossil fuels is examined, as well as many of the alternatives to 
energy resources including solar energy, wind, tidal, and 
geothermal energy, nuclear fission, and nuclear fusion. Math- 
ematical prerequisites are limited to arithmetic and simple 
algebra. 3 credits 



Politics 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



65 



Politics 



Department Chair: Marcie J. Patton, Ph.D. 



The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education. 

NOTE: Certain advanced politics courses are of- 
fered daytime only. 



The Department of Politics has attempted to develop 
a balanced and diversified curriculum which covers 
the major subfields of the discipline. While very much 
aware of the perennial questions of government and 
society which puzzled political philosophers such as 
Aristotle and Plato, the Department is concerned that 
its students be well-versed in the affairs and contend- 
ing theories of the contemporary world. It is also 
committed to the development of rigorous analytical 
skills, the arts of communication (both spoken and 
written), and experiential learning. 



Politics 



10 Courses Required 

PO 11 In Amer. Pol. 
PO 12 In Com. Pol. 
P0 14 In Pol. Theory 



Fairfield 
University 

o 



Transfer 



Introductory Level Courses 

PO 11 Introduction to American Politics 

An examination of the American political system and the Ameri- 
can political culture; consideration of the major political institu- 
tions in relation to policy perspectives: an examination of the 
ability of the political system to deal with societal problems; 
analysis of proposals for reform of the political system. 

3 credits 

PO 12 Introduction to Comparative Politics 

This course surveys selected industrialized and non-industrial- 
ized nations. It seeks to explore the relationship between 
cultural and socio-economic conditions and political behavior, 
while illustrating some of the basic concepts and methods of 
comparative political analysis. 3 credits 

PO 14 Introduction to Political Theory 

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of 
Western political theory. It analyzes the liberal political theories 
of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke and J.S. Mill and compares and 
contrasts them to a variety of communitarian, socialist and 
anarchist political theories. 3 credits 



Area I American Politics 

1 D 

2 □ 

Area II Comparative Politics/ 

International Relations 

1. 3 



? 




n 


Area III Political 
1 


Theory 


□ 


2 




□ 


Major Elective 
1- 




n 


General Electives (10 courses 
1 


? 




n 


3 




n 


4 




□ 


fi 




n 


fi 




n 


7 




3 


ft 




□ 


Q 




n 


10 




n 



Intermediate Level Courses 
Political Theory 

PO 111 Western Political Thought I: 
Ancient and Medieval 

This course focuses on the ancient and medieval traditions in 
Western political theory. First, we situate the political theories 
of theorists such as Thucydides. Plato, and Aristotle in the 
historical context of ancient Athens and assess their contempo- 
rary relevance as theories of the good political order. We then 
examine the Christian recuperation of these ancient thinkers, 
focusing on the contributions of theorists such as Augustine and 
Aquinas to this conversation about the nature of political life. We 
finish with a consideration of Machiavelli's political thought and 
the transition to modern political theory. 3 credits 

PO 112 Western Political Thought II: Modern 

This course focuses on the modern tradition of Western political 
theory. We carefully examine the work of four thinkers, includ- 
ing theorists such as Karl Marx, Max Weber. Friedrich Nietzsche, 
and Michel Foucault. Each of these theorists presents a critical 
assessment of the nature and value of modern society's cher- 
ished ideals of social and economic progress, scientific reason, 
and individual autonomy and liberty. This course is designed to 
come to terms with these unique, timely, and very controversial 
insights into the possibilities and limits of life in the modern age. 

3 credits 



66 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Politics 



P0115 Introduction to the 
Study of Peace & Justice 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the 
concepts of peace and justice, the connections between them, 
and the relationship of these concepts to the idea of faith. The 
course focuses on case studies beginning with an analysis of 
the crisis of America's cities and finds the causes in 
deindustrialization and its resulting poverty. This poverty is then 
compared to the poverty in developing nations, specifically in 
Central America. In both cases poverty is viewed as the effect 
of unjust economic and social structures including exaggerated 
military budgets at home and the militarization of developing 
countries. A theoretical basis for the study of these fundamental 
problems in justice and peace is provided by examining them 
according to the principles of Marxism, Liberalism and Catholi- 
cism. Each of these traditions has its own perspective for 
understanding these problems and for responding to them. In 
this way the course provides both an awareness of the major 
problems in justice and peace as well as an understanding of 
the different ways to think about them. 3 credits 

PO 118 American Political Thought 

This course considers the philosophical roots of American 
political thought and the influence of the American revolutionar- 
ies, constitution-makers, Federalists, Jeffersonians, 
Jacksonians, Tocqueville, Civil Warmakers, examiners of the 
welfare state, pragmatists, and new frontiersmen on the con- 
temporary American mind and institutions. Challenges and 
reform of the American political system are also treated within 
the scope of political science through an application of the 
concepts of human nature, idealism, constitutional power, and 
nationalism. 3 credits 

PO 119 Introduction to Feminist Thought 

This course examines the development of U.S. feminist theory 
from the 1960s to the present. We explore the similarities and 
differences among several approaches to feminist theorizing 
that emerged out of the U.S. women's movement, including 
liberal feminism, radical feminism, socialist feminism, 
postmodernist feminism, and the feminisms of women of color. 

3 credits 

P0 123 Modern Political Ideologies 

This course is primarily an examination of the political belief 
systems in the U.S. including conservatism, liberalism, demo- 
cratic socialism and the idea of industrial policy. These "isms" 
are analyzed with reference to democracy's ability to deal with 
the contemporary problems of American society. Marxism is 
explored in terms of the basic political and economic ideas of 
Marx and Engels as well as the modifications made in their 
system by Lenin. The basic concepts of racism are discussed 
and a brief analysis is made of the meaning of totalitarianism. 

3 credits 



International Relations 



PO 130 International Relations 

The experience of conflict and cooperation among the nations of 
the modern world is viewed in terms of the principles of realpolitik, 
morality, international law, and international organization. Spe- 
cial attention is given to the dynamics of the so-called "new world 
order" that has followed the Cold War. The class simulates 
possible future conflicts. (Formerly listed as P0 1 47; not open to 
students who have taken PO 147.) 3 credits 

PO 131 International Organization 

The course examines the history, role and functions of interna- 
tional organizations, both intergovernmental and non-govern- 
mental, and reviews the current trend toward greater reliance on 
multilateral political efforts in relations among nations. A review 
of major theories and concepts of international organizations is 
followed by a detailed examination of the United Nations, its 
Charter and related specialized agencies. Current efforts to 
reform the United Nations in a political situation different from the 
world of 1945 are also discussed. Other major themes include 
the development of some major regional organizations such as 
the NATO alliance and the new OESC, multipurpose organiza- 
tions (OAS, OAU) and functional organizations such as the 
European Union. Students learn about the role of non-govern- 
mental organizations in fields such as human rights or environ- 
mental protection. 3 credits 

PO 133 United States Foreign Policy 

Review of the U.S.'s involvement in world affairs from the 1 930s 
to the present, with special attention to the rigors and logic of the 
Cold War. Discussion of constitutional and other factors in the 
making of foreign policy. Major contemporary policies and com- 
mitments are debated by the class. (Formerly listed as PO 148; 
not open to students who have taken PO 148.) 3 credits 

PO 146 Vietnam and the American Experience 

This course explores the roots of the American involvement in 
Vietnam. Conflicting theories exploring that experience are 
analyzed. The course further investigates the clash of cultures 
involved in the war and the impact of that war on both American 
and Southeast Asian societies. 3 credits 



Comparative Politics 

PO 140 European Politics 

An analysis of political institutions and dynamics of Great Britain, 
France, Germany, and Italy. The relationship between the politi- 
cal culture and the political system is emphasized. Alternate 
methods of dealing with societal problems are analyzed. (For- 
merly listed as PO 120; not open to students who have taken 
PO120.) 3 credits 

PO 141 African Politics 

This course aims to analyze the major issues and problems that 
dominate African politics. It is designed to provide students with 
a basic understanding of African politics and society from a 



Politics 

comparative perspective. It examines such key themes as 
neocolonialism, the roles of religion and the military in politics, 
and the prospects of democracy in Africa. 3 credits 

PO 142 Latin American Politics 

Building a strong political system seems an impossibility in a 
setting of economic underdevelopment and socio-cultural dis- 
unity. This course studies the political systems of selected 
countries of mainland Latin America, such as Mexico, Guate- 
mala, Nicaragua, Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, Chile, Argentina, 
and Brazil. In particular, it examines the revolutionary method of 
change and reviews the policy dilemmas of land reform, indus- 
trialization, and control of natural resources. United States 
foreign policy toward the area — past and present — are 
reviewed. Research projects expected. 3 credits 

PO 143 Caribbean Politics 

Racism and ethnic conflict, colonialism and neocolonialism, 
grating poverty and bustling tourism all have their impact on the 
politics of these struggling countries. Migration across the first 
world's borders is examined. Countries studied include Cuba, 
Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, 
Guyana, and Suriname. Research project expected. 3 credits 

PO 144 Middle Eastern Politics 

This course aims to analyze the major issues and problems that 
dominate the Middle Eastern scene. It is designed to provide 
students with a basic knowledge of Middle Eastern politics from 
a comparative perspective. The social, economic, cultural and 
political sources of conflict and change are examined and key 
themes such as the prospects for democracy, oil and develop- 
ment, Islam and politics, are critically assessed. 3 credits 

PO 145 The Major Powers of Asia 

An analysis of the institutions and dynamics of China, Japan, 
and India. The relationship between the political culture and the 
political system are emphasized; the different paths towards 
modernization taken by each are analyzed; foreign policies of 
each of the nations are discussed. 3 credits 

PO 149 Third World Politics 

This course examines key themes in the comparative study of 
the Third World. Because this course is organized by thematic 
queries, no one region or country is singled out for study, but 
examples are selectively drawn from Asia, Africa, Latin America, 
and the Middle East. We examine a number of topics that may 
include the debate over the 'rational peasant,' the meaning of 
'the Third World,' the role of capitalism and imperialism in the 
making of the Third World, Orientalist representations of the 
Third World, cultural critiques of modernity, post-colonial re- 
sponses to globalization, and problematization of the notion of 
development. 3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 
American Politics 



67 



PO 161 The American Presidency 

A study of the role of the President in the political system. The 
origins, qualifications and limitations of office are considered as 
the President functions as chief executive, legislative leader, 
and link with the Courts. The obtaining of presidential powers, 
his roles as party leader and politician are also examined as a 
means of evaluating presidential achievement of domestic and 
foreign policy goals. Questions of reform are also reviewed. 

3 credits 

PO 163 Supreme Court I 

An examination of the politics of the Supreme Court. The 
relationship between the Court and the remainder of the political 
system is analyzed. Direct attention to the Court's treatment of 
government power including commerce clause, taxing power, 
and relations between the branches. The political consequences 
of Court decisions are emphasized. 3 credits 

PO 164 Supreme Court II 

An examination of the individual and the Court. Direct attention 
paid to Supreme Court decisions regarding civil liberties, includ- 
ing freedoms of speech, press, religion, and assembly. Also an 
examination of the rights of accused persons and the 14th 
amendment equal protection. The political implications of these 
decisions are emphasized as well as the political environment in 
which the Court functions. 3 credits 

PO 165 Political Parties, Interest Groups, 
and Public Opinion 

This course examines various linkage models that describe 
representation of citizens by leaders. Moreover, the course 
examines political parties, interest groups, and public opinion in 
terms of their contributions to popular control of American 
politics. What mechanisms do citizens have to gain compliance 
for their policy preferences? How responsive are decision mak- 
ers in the American system to citizens' demands? These ques- 
tions and others are considered in the course. 3 credits 

PO 167 Media and Politics 

This course is designed to examine the impact of the media on 
the American political system and conversely how government 
attempts to influence the media for its purposes. The implica- 
tions of the electronic media for a democratic and informed 
society are examined, and close attention is paid to the media's 
impact on national elections. Finally, the media as an agent of 
political socialization is analyzed. (Formerly listed as PO 190; 
not open to students who have taken PO 190.) 3 credits 

PO 168 Politics of Mass Popular Culture 

This course surveys the political aspects of American popular 
culture by examining the relationship between sports and poli- 
tics, the politics of rock music, and political humor and political 
satire of American politics. Mass popular culture often serves as 
regime-maintaining diversions. What values and political posi- 
tions do organized sports in the U.S. convey? What is the 
political impact of American popular music? How have citizens 
used political humor and satire of American politics to develop 
an outlook toward government? These questions and others 
are explored in the course. 3 credits 



68 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Psychology 



Department Chair: John McCarthy, Ph.D. 



The Department of Psychology introduces students to 
the content and methods of the science of psychology. 
Students survey the foundations of the field, learn about 
statistics and experimental design, and have an oppor- 
tunity to pursue specific interests through upper level 
seminars, applied internships, and independent re- 
search. The major in psychology prepares students for 
graduate study in psychology, neuroscience, medicine, 
law, education, social work, business, etc. 



Major in Psychology 

Depending on their background and orientation, stu- 
dents may choose either the B.A. or B.S. degree. The 
primary difference between the degrees is that the B.S. 
requires additional science courses outside of the Psy- 
chology Department. 



Notes Regarding Core Requirements 

1) For the Math Core requirement, 
Math 19 -Math 17 

or 121-122 (Math 121-122 is recommended) 

2) For the Science Core requirement, 
Biology 170-171 or Biology 107-108 
are strongly recommended 



B.A. Degree 



10 Courses Required 

PY101 Gen. Psych. 
PY203 Stats for Life Sci. 
PY 209 Research Methods 
PY261 Bio. Basis of Beh. 
PY 263 Dev. Psych. 
PY 300 Modern Psych. 



Choose 1 course 
PY250 Sens. / Percep. 
PY 265 Learn / Memory 
PY 285 Cognitive PY 

Choose 2 PY Electives 
1. 



Psychology 



Fairfield 
University 

□ 



Choose 1 course 
PY 248 Social Psych. 3 

PY 251 Abnor. Psych. Mjrs. 3 
PY 284 Theo. of Person. 3 



Transfer 

□ 
3 
3 

3 
3 

3 



2. 3 


3 


General Electives (10 Courses) 

1. 3 


3 


2. 3 


3 


3. 3 


3 


4. 3 


3 


5. 3 


3 


6. 3 


3 


7 3 


3 


8. "I 


3 


9. 3 


3 


10. 3 


3 



B.S. Degree 

For the B.S. degree in Psychology, requirements and 
recommendations are the same as for the B.A., except 
that Math 19 is not acceptable; Math 121-122 is re- 
quired. Additionally, students who are candidates for 
the B.S. must take science courses listed. 



Psychology 
B.S. Degree 



10 Courses Required 

PY 101 Gen. Psych. 

PY203 Stats for Life Sci. 

PY 209 Exp. Pscyh. 

PY 261 Bio. Basis of Beh. 

PY 263 Dev. Psych. 

PY 300 Modern Psych. 



Fairfield 
University 

a 

3 

o 
a 

3 

a 



Choose 1 course 

PY 248 Social Psych. □ 

PY 251 Abnor. Psych. Mjrs. 3 

PY 284 Theo. of Person. □ 

Choose 1 course 

PY250 Sens. / Percep. 3 

PY265 Learn / Memory 3 

PY285 Cognitive PY 3 

Choose 2 PY Electives 

1. 3 

2 3 



Additional Required Courses 

CH 11 Inorganic CH I 3 

CH 12 Inorganic CH II □ 

CH211 Organic CH I 3 

CH212 Organic CH II 3 

PS 83 Gen. Physics I 3 

PS 84 Gen. Physics II 3 

General Electives (4 Courses) 

1. 3 

2. 3 

3. 3 

4. 3 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



69 



Transfer 

□ 

a 

3 
3 
3 




n 



m 



S 



The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education. 



PY 101 General Psychology 

General Psychology provides an introduction to the science of 
mental processes and behavior. The course addresses a 
range of questions including: how is brain activity related to 
thought and behavior; what does it mean to learn and remem- 
ber something; how do we see. hear taste and smell: how do 
we influence one another's attitudes and actions: what are the 
primary factors that shape a child's mental and emotional 
development; how and why do we differ from one another; and 
what are the origins and most effective treatments of mental 
illness? 3 credits 

PY 132 Introduction to 

Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

This course introduces the field, contributions, and methods of 
Industrial/Organizational Psychology. The course covers the 
history of this branch of applied psychology and the 
psychologist's role, along with other scientist-practitioners 
concerned with the world of work, in developing and maintain- 
ing human work performances and work environments. Cur- 
rent concepts and methods in several specialties within I/O 
Psychology are explored: personnel, organizational behavior 
and development, counseling, labor relations, consumer, and 
engineering/ergonomic psychology. Course topics include: 
recruitment, selection, training and development, and ap- 
praisal of individuals and groups; development and change of 
organizational cultures; and relations between organizations 
and their stakeholders. Emphasis is given to the unique contri- 
butions of psychological science to understanding human work 
skills, interests, attitudes, motivations, satisfactions and 
stresses: work careers, management, leadership, communi- 
cation, group processes, and organization. 3 credits 



70 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



PY138 Psychology and the Law 

The legal system, particularly our criminal justice system, from 
its code to its enforcement, is based on implicit psychological 
assumptions about human behavior and how it should be 
controlled. This course examines those assumptions in light of 
current pyscholegal theory and research. It covers the treat- 
ment of traditional psychiatric populations (e.g., the mentally ill, 
mentally retarded, homeless) by the justice system in contrast 
to the handling of normal people; clinical issues such as the 
insanity defense, predicting dangerousness, the validity of 
psychiatric examinations and lie detectors; jury selection, eye- 
witness testimony, decision-making, sentencing and parole. 

3 credits 

PY 148 Social Psychology for Non-Majors 

This course surveys the major areas of concern in social 
psychology. The emphasis is on current issues and research in 
the fields of social influence and conformity, human aggres- 
sion, prejudice, interpersonal attraction, propaganda, and per- 
suasion. 3 credits 

PY 151 Abnormal Psychology for Non-Majors 

This course introduces the student to the field of abnormal 
behavior. The classic behavior patterns in the classification 
system are presented and the possible causes and remediation 
of such are discussed. (Students who have taken PY 251 may 
not take this course.) 3 credits 

PY162 Psychology of Death and Dying 

Recent biomedical research, psychological theory, and clinical 
experience provide the foundation for this life-cycle study of 
death, dying, and bereavement. Some selected topics include 
still-birth and perinatal death, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, 
child, adolescent, and adult cancer, suicide, and other cata- 
strophic life-threatening events (myocardial infarction, thermal 
injuries, multiple trauma accidents). In addition, considerable 
attention is devoted to a survey of grief and bereavement in 
childhood and adulthood, with particular focus on widowhood. 
Strategies for providing care for the dying are discussed, 
including a treatment of Hospice. Attitudes of health care 
professionals toward death and dying persons are examined. 
Extensive use is made of case studies, dramatic and documen- 
tary films, role play, and small group discussion. The course is 
particularly beneficial to students preparing for careers in 
clinical psychology, medicine, nursing, psychiatric social work, 
and other allied health professions, but it may be helpful to 
anyone interested in developing informed attitudes about these 
important human crises. 3 credits 

PY 163 Developmental Psychology for Non-Majors 

A development psychology approach to the growth of the 
individual from birth to old age, tracing motor, perceptual, 
language, cognitive, and emotional growth. The emphasis is 
on normal development. (Students who have taken PY 263 
may not take this course.) 3 credits 



Psychology 

PY180 Psychology of Addiction 

This course will be divided into four segments: 1 ) The physical 
and psychological components that may predispose an indi- 
vidual to addiction will be explored. Also, in this segment will be 
discussed the physical and psychological consequence of the 
addictive life style. 2) The various addictions will be detailed 
such as alcohol, drug, eating, etc. 3) The interactions of family 
members with addicts will be described. 4) The treatment 
modalities for addicts as well as the modalities for family 
members. 3 credits 

PY186 Group Dynamics 

This course is designed to give the student a basic knowledge 
of the most important theories and research on groups. There 
is an attempt to combine sociological and psychological per- 
spectives in order to give a more integrated picture of the way 
groups function. It is also possible for students to make use of 
experiential as well as classroom methods of learning. 

3 credits 

PY 187 Applications of 

Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

This course has two objectives: 1 ) reviewing selected issues in 
the characteristics and dynamics of contemporary organiza- 
tions, and 2) examining, in the context of such issues, contem- 
porary applications and emerging needs for approaches, con- 
structs, research, and methods in Industrial/Organizational 
Psychology. The course is open to majors and minors in 
Psychology and in other disciplines related to the study of 
organizations in the world of work. The roles and contributions 
of I/O Psychology have been examined in the context of issues 
and changes in: workforce demographics, diversity, and moti- 
vations; regulatory and litigating environments; organizational 
ethics; organizational values and cultures; management and 
leadership; globalization; international alliances and competi- 
tion; environmentalism and consumerism; and technological 
change. 3 credits 

PY/BI 203 Statistics for the Life Sciences 

This is an introductory course in statistical methodology and 
analysis. It includes descriptive statistics, such as frequency, 
distributions, central tendency, variability, and correlation, as 
well as an introduction to probability, sampling theory, and 
tests of significance, including the t-test, chi squared, ANOVA 
and non-parametric statistics. This course is open to majors in 
the behavioral, biological, and physical sciences. The lab is 
designed to complement the course by giving students super- 
vised computation and problem-solving exercises with calcu- 
lator and computer. 4 credits 

PY 209 Research Methods in Psychology 

Building on the material learned in Statistics (PY 203), this 
course teaches students to read, evaluate, design, conduct 
and report psychological research. Critical thinking and effec- 
tive oral and written communication are emphasized as stu- 
dents work through several different research projects. (Pre- 
requisites: PY 1 01 , PY 203.) 4 credits 



Psychology 

PY 248 Social Psychology for Majors 

This course surveys the major areas of concern in social 
psychology. The emphasis is on current issues and research in 
the fields of social influence and conformity, human aggres- 
sion, prejudice, interpersonal attraction, propaganda, and per- 
suasion. (Prerequisite: PY 1 01 . Psychology majors.) (Students 
who have taken PY 148 may not take this course.) 3 credits 

PY 250 Sensation and Perception 

How do we see, hear, touch, taste, smell? What about indi- 
vidual differences? This course deals with basic sensory mecha- 
nisms and with perceptual processing. We examine color, 
depth, pattern, and motion perception. Students complete an 
Integrative Final Project. Students may do service-learning to 
enrich their understanding of individual differences in sensa- 
tion and perception. (Prerequisite: PY 101 .) 3 credits 

PY 251 Abnormal Psychology for Majors 

The focus of this advanced course in abnormal behavior is an 
in-depth analysis of current research and theories of psycho- 
pathology. Building upon the student's knowledge of develop- 
mental psychology, the course examines both the biological 
and psychological antecedents of abnormal behavior. Oral and 
written analysis is emphasized. (Prerequisites: PY 101, PY 
263. Psychology majors.) 3 credits 

PY 261 Biological Bases of Behavior 

Understanding the brain is one of the last and most challenging 
frontiers of science. Whatever we see, hear, know, think or feel 
is determined by the functioning of our brains. Starting with the 
molecular and cellular machinery of neurons and the anatomy 
of the nervous system, the course proceeds through the neural 
basis of sensation, perception, memory, emotion, language, 
sexual behavior, drug addition, depression, schizophrenia, 
etc. Neuroscience has made enormous strides in the last 
several decades. This progress shows every sign of continuing 
at an ever increasing rate, and this course provides the foun- 
dation upon which a thorough understanding of brain-behavior 
relationships can be built. 3 credits 

PY 263 Developmental Psychology for Majors 

Utilizing a research-oriented approach, this course focuses on 
the principal themes, processes and products of human devel- 
opment from conception through adolescence. Field experi- 
ence in local Head Start programs is available. (Prerequisite: 
PY 101). 3 credits 

PY 284 Theories of Personality 

The content of the course is an advanced presentation, analy- 
sis, and evaluation of theories of personality from Freud through 
Skinner. The purpose of such a course is not only one of 
theoretical enrichment and history, but is intended to broaden 
the student's understanding of the normal human personality 
in terms of theoretical structure, function, and dynamics. (Pre- 
requisites: PY 251. PY263.) 

3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



71 



PY 285 Cognitive Psychology 

How can we study the mind 9 This course deals with attention, 
memory, thought, imagery, language, problem-solving, and 
decision-making. Individual and cultural differences are con- 
sidered. Students complete a service-learning component and 
an integrative Final Project. (Prerequisite: PY 101.) 3 credits 

PY 300 Modern Psychology: 
History and Current Issues 

This seminar is required for senior psychology majors. Its goals 
are: to introduce students to the major historical perspectives 
in psychology: to encourage critical thinking and the genera- 
tion of creative ideas: and to help students engage in a 
thoughtful questioning of the theory and knowledge base that 
constitutes the science of psychology. 3 credits 

PY 363 Psychosocial Problems of 
Childhood and Adolescence 

This course examines the problems and deviations in develop- 
ment in childhood and adolescence that are commonly a cause 
of concern in the child's social environment of family, peers, 
school and community. Theories, research, remediation and 
prevention of children's psychosocial problems will be exam- 
ined. The emphasis is on evaluating problems in psychosocial 
functioning within an ecological context and on utilizing knowl- 
edge from developmental theory and research to minimize or 
prevent their occurrence. Open to juniors and seniors. (Prereq- 
uisites: PY 163 or PY 263 and permission of instructor.) 

3 credits 

PY 398 Independent Research 

This course provides a limited number of upper division stu- 
dents (usually seniors) the opportunity to participate in all 
aspects of an advanced research project. Students wishing to 
register for this course must first obtain the consent of the 
professor with whom they will work. Frequently a research 
proposal is required prior to acceptance into this course, and 
early planning is essential. 4 credits 



72 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Religious Studies 



Religious Studies 



Department Chair: Ronald Davidson, Ph.D. 



The Religious Studies curriculum is designed as a 
critical but sympathetic inquiry into the religious dimen- 
sion of human experience. After an introduction to the 
nature of religion and the methods employed in its study, 
the student can select from a variety of courses explor- 
ing specific religious themes — scripture, spirituality, 
ethics, the problem of faith, etc. The student, with or 
without a faith commitment, has the opportunity to 
acquire an informed appreciation of the motivations and 
values given expression in religious belief. 



The Major 

The Religious Studies Department offers a major of 30 
credits which include those credits earned to satisfy the 
requirements of the core curriculum. The major pro- 
gram, defined in consultation with a departmental advi- 
sor, is tailored to the individual's personal and academic 
interests. In a comprehensive program of studies, cer- 
tain areas of concentration are possible such as Jewish 
and Christian history, religion and society, Christian 
theology, scriptural studies, ethics, Roman Catholic 
studies, and Asian religions. 



Religious Studies 



Requirements (10 courses) 
RS 

rs : 

RS 

RS 

RS 

RS 

RS 

RS 

RS 

RS 



Fairfield 
University 

□ 
□ 

D 
□ 

n 
□ 

3 



Transfer 

□ 

a 

D 

a 
a 

a 

□ 



General Electives (10 Courses) 



1._ 
2.. 
3.. 
4.. 
5.. 
6.. 
7.. 
8.. 
9.. 
10. 



*lf RS major course is used to fulfill a core 
requirement, 1 1 general electives are needed. 



The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education. 

Introductory Course 

RS 10 Introduction to Religious Studies 

This course is an introduction to the religious achievements of 
humanity. It considers the meaning and aims of religion and its 
dimensions and functions in society and the individual. Em- 
ploying the principles and methods of the humanities and 
social sciences, the course examines religious faith, values, 
and experience, as evidenced in the scriptures, traditions, 
doctrines and histories of various religions. The focus of each 
section of RS 10 is identified in the course subtitle published in 
the University Registrar's listing of course offerings. 3 credits 

RS 10 Subtitles and Descriptions 

Religion and the Critical Mind 

This section of RS 10 involves a comparative analysis of 
several understandings of religion — its nature, function and 
purpose — presented in the works of well-known scholars. 
Through an in-class conversation with these scholars through 
their writings and in multimedia presentations, students de- 
velop a thoughtful, critical appreciation of religion and its role 
in human life. 

Religion, Culture and Community 

This section of RS 10 explores the role of religion in human 
culture and community through three test cases: Christianity's 
movement from a community of believers to a religious institu- 
tion, the experiences of women in the religions of the world, and 
the phenomenon of American civil religion. 

Asian Religions 

This section of RS 1 examines religious themes and issues in 
the literature, history, and ritual of such classical Asian tradi- 
tions as Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Shinto. 



Religious Studies 

The Search for the Just Society 

This section of RS 10 investigates the religions of Judaism, 
Christianity and Islam by focusing on the understandings of a 
just society that is woven into their central beliefs. 

A Model of Religion and Religions 

This section of RS 10 offers a description of the human 
condition, disclosing the limits and absurdity to which religions 
respond. The ways people come to religious faith and the 
consequences of their commitment are described in a model 
that is applicable to many religions. 

Prophecy and Mysticism 

This section of RS 10 focuses on the two fundamental drives 
of the religious sensibility, namely, the urge toward unity with 
the holy and the concern to make a difference in the world. 

Religious Autobiography 

This section of RS 10 considers the themes, issues and 
methods of religious studies through a reading of first-person 
narratives from several religious traditions, and engages stu- 
dents in the task of writing their own religious autobiographies. 

Jerusalem as a Metaphor for the Faith of the West 

This section of RS 10 examines the faith traditions of Jews, 
Christians and Moslems in contemporary Jerusalem in order to 
appreciate the richness of their religious heritage and to 
understand the problems that continue to divide them. 

Christianity and Buddhism 

This section of RS 10 examines different kinds of religious 
experience, doctrine and practice through a comparison of the 
Western tradition of Christianity and the Asian tradition of 
Buddhism. 

Christianity and Islam 

This section of RS 10 considers major themes of religious 
thought and practice in Christianity and Islam. Through the 
study of scripture, religious texts, autobiographical writings, 
and film presentations, the course examines concepts and 
images of God. the human person, evil and human suffering, 
and experience of the transcendent in these two religious 
traditions. Drawing on these themes, the final project engages 
students in the writing of their own religious histories. 



Historical Studies 

RS115 Introduction to Catholicism 

This course is an introduction to the beliefs, doctrines, ideas 
and practices that shape the unity and diversity of the Catholic 
tradition. The course explores theological, devotional and 
spiritual forms of expression in their historical and cultural 
contexts in order to appreciate the particularity of Catholic 
themes. Consideration is also given to how these themes 
engage contemporary Catholic life and exercise an influence 
on the wider culture. 3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



73 



RS 203 Women in Judaism 

An examination of ways in which women have understood and 
experienced Judaism from the Biblical period through the 
present, drawing on historical writings, novels, theological 
essays and films. Particular attention is given to the traditional 
religious roles and status of women, the many ways in which 
women themselves have understood Jewish self-identity, and 
recent feminist efforts to re-evaluate and transform contempo- 
rary Jewish life, 
(formerly listed as RS 103) 3 credits 

RS 205 Selected Topics in the Catholic Tradition 

An examination of particular themes, events, or individuals in 
the Catholic tradition with special regard for their historical 
contexts and the ways in which they contribute to the self- 
identity of the Catholic tradition. Study is based on the close 
reading of primary sources. The subject matter of the course 
changes from semester to semester. Students should consult 
the University Registrar's listing of new courses to determine 
the specific material treated when the course is offered, 
(formerly listed as RS 105) 3 credits 

RS 207 The Reformation Era 

An examination of the religious reform of the 1 6th century. The 
course begins by probing the seeds of reform in the late 
scholastic tradition and in popular spirituality, and proceeds by 
tracing the development of the ideas and impact of the reform- 
ers: Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, Munzer, and Schwenckfeld. The 
course concludes with an investigation of the Roman Catholic 
response to reform in the events of the Council of Trent and the 
Counter-Reformation, (formerly listed as RS 107) 3 credits 

RS 242 Jews and Judaism in America 

What has it meant and what does it mean today to be a Jew in 
America? Viewing Judaism and Jewishness as inseparable 
from one another, Jews remain a distinct though by no means 
homogeneous religious and ethnic group in American society. 
This course explores the religious, cultural, social, economic 
and political diversity among American Jews as well as distinc- 
tive beliefs, concerns, and experiences that continue to unite 
them. Special attention is given to issues concerning immigra- 
tion, acculturation, gender and Black-Jewish relations. 

3 credits 

RS 244 Faith After the Holocaust 

An examination of the complexity and horror of the holocaust 
and its contemporary historical, moral, theological, and politi- 
cal implications. Was the attempted annihilation of European 
Jewry a historical aberration in German politics or did it repre- 
sent an eruption of psychic, social, and religious malignancies 
embedded in Western civilization? Was the holocaust unique? 
Could it have been prevented 9 And. in light of the holocaust, 
what does it mean to speak of faith, either in God or in 
humanity? 
(formerly listed as RS 144) 3 credits 



74 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Theology 



RS 112 The Problem of God 

An historical and theological examination of the Christian 
doctrine of God with special attention to the problematic as- 
pects of the development of this doctrine through the ages. 
This development is explored in biblical sources, patristics, 
medieval. Reformation and modern times. The course con- 
cludes with a consideration of the challenge of post-Enlighten- 
ment atheism and of the efforts of contemporary theologians to 
recast the classical conception of God. 3 credits 

RS 117 Jesus Christ Yesterday and Today 

A systematic treatment of the person and work of Jesus Christ. 
The course examines different interpretations of the meaning 
of the Christ event from the scriptural sources to contemporary 
developments. 3 credits 

RS 122 Grace and the Christian Life 

This course develops a theology of the everyday life by exam- 
ining the themes in the New Testament, early monasticism, the 
Middle Ages, and the Reformation. We then survey current 
explorations of grace, holiness and the working life, drawing 
from the insights of psychology and gender studies and attend- 
ing to concerns for economic and social justice. 3 credits 

RS123 The Church 

A study of the development and present-day understanding of 
the idea of the Church in Roman Catholic theology. The course 
examines the roots of the concept in scripture and the earlier 
traditions of the Church, and presents a contemporary 
ecclesiology through a critical discussion of the First and 
Second Vatican Councils. 3 credits 

RS 126 The Sacraments in Christian Life 

A theological investigation of the sacraments as the source of 
Christian character, involvement, and witness. The course 
proposes an anthropological theology as a basis for under- 
standing faith and develops a process/model view of the 
Christian's relationship with God. The course presents the 
Eucharist as the focus of Christian self-awareness; Baptism. 
Confirmation, and Penance as sacraments of reconciliation. 
Special sacramental questions are also considered. 3 credits 

RS 260 The Writings of Paul 

A study of the texts and recurring themes of the writings 
attributed to Paul. Particular emphasis is on Paul's treatment of 
ethical situations, community, and religious experience, 
(formerly listed as RS 1 60) 3 credits 

RS 264 The Writings of John 

A study of the text of the gospel and epistles attributed to John. 
Particular emphasis is placed upon the recurring themes in 
these writings, the distinctive view of Christianity they repre- 
sent, and the development of early Christianity to which they 
witness, 
(formerly listed as RS 164) 3 credits 



Religious Studies 

RS 266 The Reinterpretation of the New Testament 

An introduction to the critical study of the New Testament in 
which the methodologies of literary form and redaction criti- 
cism are explained. The varying titles for Jesus are reviewed 
and compared with the original Jewish or Greek usage. The 
process of reinterpretation of Jesus in the New Testament is 
reviewed, 
(formerly listed as RS 166) 3 credits 



Theological Ethics 

RS172 Contemporary Morality: 
Basic Questions 

A study of the fundamental concepts of moral theology in terms 
of the major emphases of contemporary Christian thought. 
Specific reference is made to more significant current prob- 
lems: conscience and law. freedom and obligation, personal- 
istic and existential ethics, and the conflict of values in a 
pluralistic society. 3 credits 

RS 175 Contemporary Moral Problems 

A theological examination of current ethical issues, especially 
the pervasive problem of violence (just war theory and contem- 
porary applications, pornography, the decline of civility), and 
the challenges of new technologies (the regulation of birth, 
euthanasia, computers and information-systems). 3 credits 



Asian Religions 

RS 287 Hinduism 

An introduction to the seminal texts, concepts and images of 
the major religious tradition of India. Topics include Vedic 
ritualism; Upanishadic mysticism; yoga meditation; the 
Bhagavad Gita; the caste system; Vedanta philosophy; the 
cults of Rama. Krishna, Shiva and the Goddess; and Gandhi's 
philosophy of non-violent action. Hinduism is viewed as an 
historical phenomenon, a formative influence on Indian culture 
and society, and a response to the human condition, 
(formerly listed as RS 187) 3 credits 

RS288 Buddhism 

This course explores the Indian Buddhist tradition, from its 
beginning in the life of Shakyamuni Buddha through the present 
revival of neo-Buddhism in the activism of oppressed classes. 
The early formative ideas of the Buddha, the Awakened One, 
are considered as they unfold in the course of Indian history 
and society. Buddhist meditation and philosophy are dis- 
cussed as procedures devised to elicit the awakened state. 
Developments in Buddhist religious orders, lay social life, and 
the rise of the Great Vehicle tradition are examined through 
written and visual works. Art and archaeology provide a context 
for Buddhism's compelling missionary activity throughout Cen- 
tral and Southeast Asia, 
(formerly listed as RS 188) 3 credits 



Religious Studies 
Special Topics 

RS197 Evil 

This course explores the problem of evil from the perspectives 
of theology and philosophy. The course considers God and 
evil, classical theodicies (reasonable justifications of God 
before the prevalence of evil), modern philosophical accounts 
of evil, social evil, and the possibility of belief in the face of evil. 
Within the context of these subjects, the course addresses the 
following questions: What is evil? What are the roots of evil? 
What effect does one's understanding of evil have on one's 
understanding of the human being, of God, and of religion? 
What is our responsibility in the face of evil? 3 credits 

RS 301 Independent Study 

This program of study is defined by the student in consultation 
with a director from the department. 3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



75 



For the latest course information 

visit our website 
www.fairfield.edu/sce/index.htm 

Go to Class Hour Schedules 
to search for course offerings. 



Sociology and Anthropology 



Department Chair: Dennis Hodgson, Ph.D. 



Sociology is the scientific study of human society and 
social behavior. It seeks to understand why individuals 
form groups and how membership in groups influ- 
ences the individual's behavior. Why do human beings 
form families? Why do the rich act, and even think, 
differently from the poor? What makes some people 
break social rules and others obey them? What holds 
societies together? Why do all societies change over 
time? These are questions which sociologists ponder. 
Anthropology asks similar questions, while emphasiz- 
ing cross-cultural, cross-disciplinary and longer-term 
perspectives. Its comparative approach highlights 
patterns of similarity and difference among human 
groups, and helps us understand our own practices 
and those of others in a broader cross-cultural context. 

Students majoring in Sociology at Fairfield University 
begin theirstudy by taking several fundamental courses 
which provide them with an understanding of the basic 
concepts and methodology of the field. The student 
builds on this foundation by selecting from a wide 
variety of elective courses. Each student is carefully 
and individually advised throughout his or her stay at 
Fairfield. The faculty strives to clarify career goals and 
to put together a concentration of courses and experi- 
ences that will ensure for the student intellectual 
fulfillment and a viable career. 

All sociology majors and minors are urged to consult 
with the Chair and other members of the Sociology 
Department in planning their academic programs. 
This is especially important in coordinating particular 
course concentrations most suitable for individual 
career goals. 



76 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Sociology & Anthropology 



Requirements (10 courses) 
SO 1 1 General Soc. 
SO 112 Amer. Society 
SO 121 Statistics 
SO 222 Research Des. 
SO 328 Soc. Theory I 
SO 329 Soc. Theory II 

4 Sociology Electives 

1 



Fairfield 
University 



Transfer 



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4. n 


□ 


General Electives (10 Courses) 

1 n 


□ 


? n 


□ 


a. n 


□ 


4. □ 


a 


5 n 


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fi. n 


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7 n 


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ft n 


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9 n 


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a 



Required 1 US Diversity Course 

1 World Diversity Course 



Requirements for the Minor 

Sociology minors take a minimum of 18 credits in 
Sociology and/or Anthropology, including two required 
courses: SO 1 1 , and a choice of either SO 222 or 328. 

Internships 

If an internship is taken (for three or six credits), the 
internship is in addition to the basic requirements of 
the major or minor. 

Sociology and Non-Majors 

All Sociology and Anthropology courses, except SO 
222, 279, 328, 329, and Field Work Placement (SO 397- 
398), are open to all students without prerequisite. 



Sociology & Anthropology 

The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education. 



SO 11 General Sociology 

This course is an introduction to sociology. It aims to provide 
the student with a sense of sociology's orientation; its particular 
way of looking at human behavior in the context of people's 
interaction with each other. The course emphasizes the kinds 
of questions sociology asks, the methods it uses to search for 
answers, and how it applies the answers to problems of 
people's everyday lives and issues of social policy. 3 credits 

SO 112 American Society 

This course analyzes the dominant ideology and values which 
have shaped American culture — namely, the Protestant Ethic 

— and how and why these values are changing. This is 
followed by an analysis of major institutional trends that have 
transformed and continue to transform America and the mod- 
ern world: bureaucratization, industrialization, urbanization, 
the rise of the business corporation, science, and technology 

— and the effects of these institutions in producing new 
personality types, mass society, and rapid social change. 
Purpose of the course is to provide a macro-sociological 
framework. 3 credits 

SO 121 Statistics: 

Social and Political Data Analysis 

This course is designed to provide a basic introduction to the role 
of statistical analysis in understanding social and political data. 
Emphasis is placed upon actual data analysis using the 
University's computer facilities. An extensive social and political 
data archive including 1980 Census data, political polls, and 
national survey data are utilized for computer analysis. 

4 credits 

SO 142 Sociology of the Family 

The family is a basic social institution of all societies. The 
course begins by examining family systems as they exist in 
other cultures and in times past. However, the central focus of 
the course is on understanding the contemporary American 
family system. American patterns of dating, mate selection, 
sexual behavior, marriage, parenting, and aging are examined 
as well as alternative life styles and family instability. 

3 credits 

SO 145 Society and Self 

Sociological approaches to the relationship of society and the 
self are studied. The main emphasis will be on Symbolic 
Interactionism, but other approaches will be covered. The 
focus will be on how the self is constructed in occupations and 
organizations, and in personal lives. 

3 credits 



Sociology & Anthropology 

SO 151 Sociology of Religion 

This course is a combined theoretical and empirical treatment 
dealing with: the sociology of religion; the character of religious 
institutions; the relations of religious institutions with other 
institutions in society; and the internal social structure of 
religious institutions. Particular attention is given to the pro- 
cess of secularization in the modern world and the crisis this 
poses for traditional religion. 3 credits 

SO 161 American Class Structure 

This course examines the roots and structure of class in the 
U.S., as well as the consequences of this hierarchical arrange- 
ment on everyday life. Although the primary focus of the course 
is on social class, the dynamics and consequences of social 
class cannot be fully understood without addressing the com- 
plex interconnections between class, race and gender. 

3 credits 

SO 162 Race, Gender, and Ethnic Relations 

An analysis of sociological and social psychological dimen- 
sions of race relations, ethnic interaction, and the changing 
role and status of women. While the focus of the course is on 
the American scene, problems of women and minorities in 
other parts of the world are also examined along with their 
importance for world politics. What sociologists and social 
psychologists have learned about improving dominant/mi- 
nority relations is considered, (formerly listed as Race and 
Ethnic Relations) 3 credits 

SO 169 Women: Work and Sport 

Sex and gender stratification exists in most areas of everyday 
life throughout American society. This course concentrates on 
women in the workplace and in sport. Women's occupational 
status and the accompanying roles from the colonial period to 
the present are analyzed from a variety of theoretical perspec- 
tives including the biological, social learning and feminist 
approaches. Since sport is a microcosm of society, the percep- 
tions and experiences of female athletes in twentieth century 
America are treated as a mirror of the inequality within the 
larger world. 3 credits 

SO 171 Criminology 

This course examines the origin, causes, and history of crime. 
It also explores victimless crime, white-collar crime, and orga- 
nized crime. The control of crime and the agencies of control 
are also examined as well as the techniques of punishment and 
rehabilitation. 3 credits 

SO 175 Sociology of Law 

The basis of this course is the relationship of law and society. 
Several issues explored are the meaning of law, civil disobedi- 
ence and other challenges, and law as an agent of social 
change. A major theme of the course is legal equality vs. social 
inequality — a theme to be analyzed in terms of discrimination 
against the poor, women, and various racial groups. The 
second half of the semester is devoted to a discussion of the 
role of lawyers, the police, and the courts in American society. 

3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



77 



SO 222 Methods of Research Design 

A study of the nature and function of the scientific methods as 
applied to the field of sociology. Emphasis is placed upon survey 
research design and secondary analysis of existing data. Teams 
of students design and conduct research projects as part of the 
course assignments. (Prerequisite: SO 1 1) 4 credits 

SO 279 Seminar: Criminal Justice System 

This seminar explores in detail the workings and problems of the 
criminal justice system in the United States. In addition to 
investigating the sources of criminal behavior, the course fo- 
cuses on the arraignment process, probation, the trial, sentenc- 
ing, prison reform, and parole. Site visits supplement lectures 
and discussion. (Prerequisite: SO 171) 3 credits 

AY 110 Physical Anthropology and Archaeology 

The study of natural selection, primate evolution, and living 
primate societies, provides a baseline from which to study 
the evolution of the human species. The course also traces 
human cultural and social development from the foraging 
bands of the first humans to the civilizations that appeared at 
the dawn of written history. Physical variation among living 
populations is also studied. 3 credits 

AY 111 Cultural Anthropology 

Why is there such variety among human societies in the way 
their members live, dress, speak, behave toward one an- 
other, and worship? This course explores the shared pat- 
terns of thought, behavior, and feelings - that is, the cultures 
- of a number of peoples, and offers an explanation for the 
form they take and the differences between them. A primary 
goal is to develop a new perspective on the values and 
institutions of Western culture. 3 credits 

AY 168 Women and Men: 
The Anthropology of Gender 

Through a comparison of selected Asian. Middle Eastern, 
African, and Native American societies, this course explores 
the ways that culture can mold the biological facts of sexual 
difference into socially accepted behavior, creating two, and 
sometimes more, genders. Topics include the allocation of 
work, power, and prestige between men and women, the 
belief systems that legitimate gender roles, and some pos- 
sible causes for the wide variation that exists among cul- 
tures. 3 credits 



78 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Visual & Performing Arts 



Visual and Performing Arts 



Department Chair: Kathryn Jo Yarrington, MFA 

The major consists of a minimum 30 credits of 
coursework in the Department of Visual and Performing 
Arts which must be completed in a single area of 
concentration chosen by the student. Areas of concen- 
tration available to majors are: Art History (AH), Music 
(MU), Studio Art (SA, 33 credits), and Theatre (TA). 

For further information about the curriculum and areas 
of concentration, consult the Program Directors: 



Art History: 

Film and Television: 

Jazz & Popular Music: 

Classical Music: 

Studio Art: 

Theatre: 



Jesus Escobar 
James Mayzik, S.J. 
Brian Torff 
Laura Nash 
Eve Andree Laramee 
Martha LoMonaco 



In order to satisfy the Visual and Performing Arts core 
requirement of six credits, students must take three 
credits in a lecture course from the areas of art history, 
music history, theatre, or film history. The remaining 
three credits may be taken from any of the Visual and 
Performing Arts course offerings. 

Studio art, film and television, and some theatre courses 
require a materials fee. Students enrolling in these 
courses will be billed $35 per student per course. 




Programs 

I. ART HISTORY 

Program Director: Jesus Escobar, Ph.D. 

We live in a visual world and the field of art history is 
an essential tool for experiencing humanity's visible 
achievements. The Art History program has expanded 
in recent years and now offers a complete academic 
curriculum covering all the major movements and 
periods of western civilization as well as courses on 
the arts of Asia, the Americas and Africa. 

The Art History program has a range of goals including: 

• enabling students to develop a visual vocabulary 

• developing multiple perspectives on key paradigm 
monuments in their cultural contexts 

• establishing an understanding of the cross-disciplin- 
ary nature of art history as a gateway connected to 
the humanities and liberal arts 

• developing a student's abilities to organize ideas, 
respond, write and speak coherently about repre- 
sentational issues 

• encouraging students to take advantage of the world- 
class museums and collections in Connecticut and 
New York City 

• motivating each student to attain direct involvement 
and aesthetic pleasure from the knowledge and 
comprehension of world art 

With a strong emphasis on the relationship between 
historical research, written analysis and observational 
interpretation, students of Art History come to possess 
a powerful visual vocabulary. Coursework leads to a 
capstone experience with either a seminar or an inde- 
pendent study during the senior year. These interpre- 
tive skills are essential for professional gateways into 
teaching, museum and gallery curating, marketing 
and media careers, as well as nearly every job requir- 
ing visual analysis. 

The format of all art history courses is illustrated slide 
lectures with informal student discussion. The rich 
heritage of the visual arts is presented in these slide 
lectures allowing students to observe the vast pan- 
orama of the visual arts. The courses listed below 
focus on developments from pre-history to the present. 

All Art History courses count as "history of" for the 
Visual and Performing Arts core. 



Visual & Performing Arts 
Visual & Performing Arts 

— Art History Concentration 

Fairfield 
University 
10 Courses Required 

At least two of the following: 
AH 10 Intro, to Art History ~l □ 

AH 11 Intro, to Art History II □ □ 

AH 12 Art History of Asia, 

Africa & Americas □ □ 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



79 



Transfer 



At least one from each of the following areas. 
Students may take: 

Area 1 Ancient/Non-West. 3 "I 

Area 2 Medieval D 3 

Area 3 Renaissance 3 3 

Area 4 Baroque 3 □ 
Area 5 Modern / Amer. / 

Photo / Graphics □ □ 



Additional Courses (3): 

Studio Course 

AH 290 or 295 

AH 3xx 



General Electives (10 Courses, 

8 must be outside of Visual and Performing Arts) 

1 3 3 

2 3 3 

3 3 3 

4 3 3 

5 3 3 

6 3 3 

7 3 3 

8 3 3 

9 □ □ 

10 3 3 



The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education. 

AH 1 Origins and Transformations in Western Art 

From the mysterious depths of paleolithic cave painting to the 
soaring heights of Gothic cathedral vaulting, this course sur- 
veys the early history of Western Art. We begin with the origins 
of art-making in prehistoric, Mesopotamian. Egyptian, Greek, 
and Roman cultures. Then, the transformations of these an- 
cient traditions in the arts are viewed in Early Christian and 
Medieval societies. The course offers students a working 
vocabulary with which to compose visual analyses of works of 
art and evaluate them in a social and historical context. One 
class takes place on location at the Metropolitan Museum of Art 
in New York. 3 credits 



AH 11 Visual Culture Since 1400: 
Expression and Experimentation 

This course explores the ways in which people have used 
images to record their world. From the development of linear 
perspective in the early Renaissance to the assimilation of 
advances in optical sciences in the Baroque to the incorpora- 
tion of photography in the nineteenth century, art has re- 
sponded to technological advances and created distinct and 
expressive visual cultures. Exploring painting, sculpture, the 
graphic arts, and architecture, students learn to analyze how 
the contemporary world is designed and defined by a visual 
heritage that incorporates historical images into film, televi- 
sion, and market-driven advertising. One class takes place on 
location at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. 

3 credits 

AH 12 Introduction to the Art History 
of Asia, Africa and the Americas 

In this introductory lecture course works of art and architecture 
from each continent are examined to understand the respec- 
tive traditions of Asia, Africa and the Americas. Emphasis is 
given to a selection of examples within a chronological se- 
quence. Different art historical approaches are essential and 
pragmatic as the material culture from each of these three 
areas is studied. India, China and Japan form the basis for the 
study of Asia. Cultures designated by their geographical loca- 
tions provide a frame of study for African Art. The Americas are 
represented by Pre-Columbian, Northwest Coast, and Native 
American visual arts. Emphasis is given to art collections in 
New Haven and New York City, and one bus trip is organized 
during the semester to offer students a first-hand experience 
studying original works of art. 3 credits 

NOTE: To enroll in any art history course numbered AH 
100 or higher, students are advised to complete at least 
one of the introductory courses: AH 10. 11 or 12. 

AH 100 Arts of India, China and Japan 

This course is a survey of the art and architectural history of 
three major civilizations in Asia. Sacred and secular material 
culture in painting, sculpture and architecture are studied 
during the formation and development of each civilization and 
compared with their modern achievements. In each instance 
the scope of history covers at least three millennia. Specific 
focus is given to the Mauryan. Kushan and Gupta periods in 
India, to the Chou, Han. Tang. Song and Ch'mg Dynasties in 
China, and to the Nara, Heian. Kamakura, Edo. Tokugawa and 
Meiji periods in Japan. Emphasis is given to the contrasting 
periods of isolation and open contact between these civiliza- 
tions and with those in the west. Collections of Asian art at Yale 
University and in New York City are highlighted during the 
lecture course, and trips to study these collections are ar- 
ranged. 3 credits 



80 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



AH 110 The Ancient Near East, Egypt 
and the Aegean Bronze Age 

A survey of the cities and sanctuaries that flourished in 
Mesopotamia (Ur, Babylon, Nineveh, Persepolis), Egypt 
(Thebes, Amarna, Karnak, Luxor) and the Aegean basin (the 
Cycladic islands, Crete, Thera, Troy, Mycenae, Pylos) as early 
as 3000 B.C., with the invention of writing, and their domination 
of the eastern Mediterranean into the first millennium B.C. The 
distinctive artistic developments and architectural forms of 
these three enduring cultures are analyzed as well as their 
impact on western civilization. Emphasis is given to objects in 
area museums, and field trips are included. 3 credits 

AH 111 Greek Art and Archaeology 

This survey covers the major developments in architecture, 
sculpture and painting from the time of Homer to the collapse 
of the Hellenistic world. Consideration is given to the formation 
of the panhellenic sanctuaries of Olympia and Delphi in the 
Geometric and Archaic periods and the rise of democracy 
under the leadership of Pericles in Athens culminating in the 
Parthenon of the High Classical period, to the creation of an 
empire under Alexander the Great. The legacy of the Greek 
achievement is explored in the context of its impact on the 
Roman world and later art. Emphasis is given to objects in area 
museums, and field trips are included. 3 credits 

AH 112 Etruscan and Roman Art 
and Archaeology 

A survey of the arts of the Etruscans, predecessors to the 
Romans on the Italic peninsula, and its impact on the Roman 
Republic. The development of Roman art and archaeology is 
traced from the Republic to the late empire, from the center of 
Rome and the achievements of Augustus to the official recog- 
nition of Christianity by Constantine the Great. Consideration 
is given to the influence of the Greek legacy and Roman 
developments. Emphasis is given to objects in area museums, 
and field trips are included. 3 credits 

AH 113 Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt: 
Images for Eternity 

The course is devoted to the history of ancient Egyptian art 
from the Predynastic Period (ca. 4200 BCE) to its last manifes- 
tation in the time of the Roman occupation (100 CE). The 
survey focuses on major themes, important stylistic move- 
ments, and selected masterpieces of Egyptian architecture, 
sculpture, reliefs, painting and minor arts. Consideration is 
given to the formation of major arts in the Predynastic Period; 
great monuments of the Old Kingdom such as Djoser, Cheops 
and Chephren Pyramid complexes; classical art of the Middle 
Kingdom with the royal temples, pyramids and tombs at Lisht 
and Deir el Bahari; New Kingdom temples at Karnak and Luxor, 
and the splendor and revolution of Amarna art. Emphasis is 
given to the objects in area collections, especially in the 
Metropolitan Museum of Art. 3 credits 



Visual & Performing Arts 

AH 120 Medieval Art 

An introduction to Medieval art and architecture in Western 
Europe, from its Roman, Jewish and Early Christian sources to 
the Gothic period. The course explores continuity and change 
in the arts and society, including relationships to Celtic, Islamic, 
Anglo-Saxon, and Byzantine art. A field trip to the Cloisters, the 
medieval branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is in- 
cluded. 3 credits 

AH 121 The Celtic World and Early Irish Art 

This course traces the origins of Celtic art from 1 500 B.C. to its 
modern afterlife. The spread of Irish monasticism to a broader 
European culture and the later complementary appearance in 
Ireland of Continental styles such as the Romanesque and 
Gothic are addressed. Specific topics include the sources for 
Irish Celtic art, the transportable wealth of reliquaries and 
jewelry, liturgical art such as manuscripts and chalices, the 
Irish High Cross, monasteries and castles, and 19th and 20th 
century medieval revivals in America. The course underscores 
that Irish delight which transforms nature into the imaginary, 
the monstrous and the magical. 3 credits 

AH 130 Renaissance Art in Italy 

In its painting, architecture, and sculpture, we discover the re- 
emergence of the individual will in Renaissance society. Begin- 
ning with the new naturalism of Giotto and continuing through 
the High Renaissance in Rome with masterpieces by Bramante, 
Michelangelo, and Raphael, the artist asserted his influence on 
court and church. A social-economic focus is seen in the rising 
status of the artist from guild-oriented craftsman to the inde- 
pendent genius acting as the peer of monarchs, clerics and 
merchant patrons. 3 credits 

AH 135 Renaissance and Baroque Architecture 

Surveying the architecture and urbanism of 15th through early 
18th century Europe and its colonial world, this course ad- 
dresses topics such as the Renaissance revival of antiquity 
and its impact on architecture, the changing nature of architec- 
tural practice, the role of religious orders like the Jesuits in the 
dissemination of architectural style and taste, and the impor- 
tance of illustrated books in advancing theoretical and practical 
notions about architecture and the city. The course term paper 
assignment considers the legacy of Renaissance and Baroque 
architecture in the United States Northeast. (Prerequisite: 
AH 10 or AH 11.) 3 credits 

AH 140 Baroque Art 

The 17th century in Europe is marked by profound shifts in 
religion, society and economics which are reflected in the art 
produced during that tumultuous period. This course surveys 
the painting, sculpture, architecture and urbanism of the 17th 
century, with a focus on France, Italy and Spain. Among the 
themes explored are the notion of classicism in the arts, the 
role of academies and the market in promoting the arts, the 
phenomenal output of portraiture and self-portraiture and the 
shaping of cities as works of art. Previous completion of AH 1 
or AH 1 1 is strongly recommended. 3 credits 



Visual & Performing Arts 

AH 152 Modern Art 

The shifting styles and currents of modern art are studied from 
the realist Courbet and Manet and their contemporaries to the 
rebellious years of the Impressionists. The 20th century is 
explored from the Fauvists' explosion of color to the new 
spatial-physics of Cubism under Picasso. The triumphs and 
failures of modern civilization are documented in the experi- 
mental efforts of the Constructivists. Dadaists, Surrealists, and 
Abstract Expressionists. A principal concern in the course is 
the question: "What is the artist of the 20th century telling us 
about our world?" 3 credits 

AH 154 Impressionism and Post-Impressionism 

This course studies the 19th century French art movement 
which revolutionized painting. Monet, Manet, Renoir, and 
Pissaro are covered along with their contemporaries in Paris, 
their students, and followers. The Post-Impressionists with 
their innovations are also included. Museum trips to study 
original works are included. 3 credits 

AH 161 American Architecture 

The art of building in America, from pre-Columbian times to the 
present. Tradition, economics, engineering, and environmen- 
tal factors influencing its development. We examine the home, 
the church, the school, the business center, and the sports 
complex as reflections of the American way of life. Special 
emphasis is placed on the architecture of today. The aim of the 
course is to develop an understanding of the man-made 
environment, and its special relations to ourselves, as individu- 
als and as a society. 3 credits 

AH 162 American Sculpture 

Major periods and landmarks in American sculpture, from the 
Colonial era to the present, are chronicled and analyzed. The 
development of American sculpture is set within the framework 
of Western Art as a whole in order to illustrate American 
sculpture's complexity, richness and truly national character. 
Emphasis is placed on its role in the remarkable flowering of 
the sister arts of painting, sculpture and architecture during the 
rise and fall of the Beaux-Arts tradition within the American 
Renaissance. Two classes will meet at sculptors' studios. 

3 credits 

AH 163 American Art: 

Colonial Elegance to Civil War Realism 

The first two centuries of American Art reflect the dramatic 
individualism of the early settlers. English, Dutch and Spanish 
immigrants created varied and vigorous styles of art and 
architecture. American Art examines these styles, from Colo- 
nial towns and plantations to Federal architecture commis- 
sioned by Washington and Jefferson, as well as vividly realistic 
images of the Civil War by Winslow Homer and photographer 
Matthew Brady. Useful for students of American history, and 
American studies. Field trips are included for study of original 
architecture, painting, and furniture in public and private collec- 
tions. 3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



81 



AH 164 American Art: 

Civil War to Civil Rights (1860-1960) 

This course continues with the arts and architecture of the 
Early Republic (see FA 152) and expands into the major 
movements and masters of American art from the Civil War to 
the present. In tracing the themes and artistic statements of 
American artists we take special notice of unifying national 
myths such as: the Founding Fathers, Manifest Destiny, America 
as the New Eden, the Frontier from the Rockies to the Lunar 
Surface, Heroes from Davy Crockett to Superman, and America 
as Utopia. Through the masterpieces of Church. Cole, Homer, 
Eakins, Sloan, Hopper, Pollock, Rothko, Wyeth, Warhol, and 
the "Downtown" art scene, we try to determine: "What is 
uniquely American about American art?" 3 credits 

AH 172 History of Photography 

Photography is one of the youngest artistic media, yet is the 
one most evident in, and crucial to, twentieth-century culture. 
The history of photography in the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries is traced, with emphasis given to the interplay be- 
tween the growth of photography as an art form and technologi- 
cal developments of the medium, and to the multiple functions 
filled by photography in modern and post-modern culture. 
Both photographic movements and the work of individual 
photographers are stressed, and the relationship of photogra- 
phy to other art forms is analyzed. 3 credits 

AH 174 History of the Graphic Arts: 
Prints, People, Process 

A history of the graphic arts from their beginning in the West 
until the twentieth century, including the media of woodcut, 
engraving, etching, lithography and silkscreen. An in-depth 
look at such master printmakers as Durer. Rembrandt. Goya 
and Picasso, as well as an examination of the role of the printed 
image in dispensing information, illustrating the Bible, provid- 
ing affordable art for the masses, and expressing the alienation 
of the modern artist. We explore the chronological develop- 
ment of techniques, the difference between painted and 
graphic works in the careers of individual artists such as 
Whistler, the Impressionists and German Expressionists, as 
well as the relationship to major themes in European art 
movements. A field trip to see a collection of prints or an 
exhibition is scheduled. 3 credits 

AH 180 Modern Architecture 

This course introduces the student to key principles and 
moments in the history of the built environment from antiquity 
to the 20th century. Architecture is considered in its social and 
political context, paying careful attention to the symbolic mean- 
ings that buildings convey. Topics covered in the course 
include the classical tradition of architectural design, the rela- 
tionship between architectural practice and technology, the 
emergence of the capital city, and modern urban concerns 
such as parks, housing, and public works. 3 credits 



82 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



AH 213 Through Egyptian Eyes: Enigmatic Aspects 
of Ancient Egyptian Art History 

Can we really comprehend ancient Egyptian masterpieces just 
by looking at them? Can we rely on ancient Egyptian sculpture 
and painting to study Egyptians' physical appearance, cults, 
and habits? Can we call Egyptian art art? Can Egyptian 
portraits be called portraits? What is the difference between 
Egyptian writing and representations? What could Egyptians 
themselves appreciate in the art of Akhetaten and Nefertiti: its 
innovation or its traditionalism? What is the difference tradi- 
tions archaism in ancient Egyptian art? What is Egyptomania? 
These and other puzzling questions will be discussed. We 
cannot truly comprehend Egyptian art without some knowl- 
edge of underlying conventions, religious functions, philo- 
sophical conceptions, symbolism and magic. This course will 
help you not only appreciate but also understand Egyptian art. 
2 classes will be held at Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

3 credits 

AH 290 Special Topics Seminar 

An offering for study in-depth of a specific subject in the history 
of art. Open to selected students. 3 credits 

AH 295 Museum/Gallery Curating 

This course explores the role of museum and gallery curator. 
Facets of curator's responsibilities are explored dealing with 
the object, the museum, collectors, federal and corporate 
funding. Field trips. Art history prerequisites. 3 credits 

AH 300 Independent Study 

An exploration in depth of a specific topic in art history involving 
independent research and field study. Available to selected 
students upon approval of faculty and Chair. 3 credits 

AH 308 Art Seminars Abroad 

A ten-day art history study tour of European countries offered 
annually during Spring recess or after final exams. Students 
visit major cities, sites, museums, and collections under the 
direction of a fine arts faculty member. Students may elect to 
join the tour on a credit basis requiring a paper or project to be 
submitted six weeks after return. See appropriate faculty 
member for details. Applications due last week of October, last 
week of January. 3 credits 

AH 310 Internship 

The Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts provides qualified art 
history and studio art majors with museum planning, and 
organizational and exhibition techniques by working on gallery 
exhibits at the Walsh Art Gallery. 

In addition, senior Visual and Performing Arts students may be 
placed in a number of regional art institutions including the- 
atres, historical societies, and museums for professional in- 
ternships. These are highly selective and require permission 
from Professor Katherine Schwab before registration. 

3 credits 

AH 311-330 Junior/Senior Seminar 

Juniors and seniors are expected to take this seminar offered 
annually on topics that provide a capstone experience. Topics 
reflect areas of expertise and research among the full-time 
faculty. 3 credits 



Visual & Performing Arts 
II. MUSIC 

Director of Jazz & Popular Music: Brian Torff, CAS 
Director of Classical Music: Laura Nash, Ph.D. 



The Department of Visual and Performing Arts offers 
a concentration in Music, which aims at a balance 
between history and theory. 

Visual and Performing Arts Major 
with a Concentration in Classical Music 

MU 1 1 Early Survey of Musical Styles 
MU 12 Late Survey of Musical Styles 
MU 150 Music Theory and Composition I 

(may exempt with permission of instructor) 
MU 250 Music Theory and Composition II 
MU 301 Advanced Music Theory and Composition 

Students may choose another 2 or 3 music history 
courses at the 100 or 200 level, and are expected to 
have at least two semesters of 300-level work. 

Up to 6 performance credits (lessons or performing 
groups) may be applied to the major. 

Visual and Performing Arts Major 

with a Jazz/Popular Music Concentration 

All Visual and Performing Arts majors concentrating in 
Jazz/Popular Music are required to complete 30 credits 
as follows: 

THEORY (Total of 6 credits) 

MU 155 Jazz Theory & Improvisation 3 credits 

Choice of: 

MU 156 Intro to Midi and Music Software 3 credits 

MU 158A Intro to Recording Techniques 3 credits 



PERFORMANCE* (Total of 6 credits) 
MU 256 Jazz Ensemble 

(one credit per semester) 



6 credits 



Music lessons may be substituted with permission of 
Prof. Torff. 

'Theory and music history courses may be taken instead of 
performance courses. 

HISTORY (15 credits) 

MU 101 History of Jazz 3 credits 

MU 102 History & Development of Rock 3 credits 

MU 1 12 The Music of Black Americans 3 credits 

MU 122 World Music History & Ensemble 3 credits 

MU 157A Intro to the Music Industry 3 credits 



INTERNSHIP OR 
INDEPENDENT STUDY 



3 credits 



Visual & Performing Arts 
A. Music History 

A a Applied Music 
H = Music History 

The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education 

MU101 The History of Jazz (H) 

This course traces the development of American jazz from its 
origins in black musical traditions. We will examine the roots of 
jazz in ragtime, blues, worksongs, and march music. The 
developments of different jazz styles will be studied such as 
dixieland in the 20's, swing in the 30's, bop in the 40's. and 
continuing to the present. Special emphasis will be placed 
upon connecting the historical period with the music of jazz - 
America's original art music. No prerequisites. 3 credits 

MU 102 The History and 
Development of Rock (H) 

This course will survey the musical and social trends which 
resulted in the emergence of rock and roll as an important 
musical and cultural force in America. We will trace the roots of 
rock, blues, and country styles, showing how they merged with 
popular music. Periods from the 1950's to the present will be 
studied, along with Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, 
the Beatles, the British invasion, folk music, Bob Dylan, jazz 
and art rock, Jimi Hendrix, the west coast movement, and the 
music industry. Students will be able to understand, discuss, 
and differentiate between stylistic periods and their historical 
relevance to American culture. No prerequisites. 3 credits 

MU111 The Life and Music 
of George Gershwin (H) 

This course focuses on the life and music of one of America's 
greatest composers, George Gershwin. At home in popular as 
well as serious music, Gershwin is beloved for his popular 
songs written for Broadway shows and Hollywood musicals, 
and concert works such as Rhapsody in Blue and An American 
in Paris. He led a fascinating life that illuminates the decades 
of the 1920s and 1930s. We study his life and music through 
readings, movies, listening, and class discussion. No prereq- 
uisites. 3 credits 

MU 112 The Music of Black Americans (H) 

This course is a musical and historical survey course of African 
American music and its important contributions to American 
culture. African heritage, slave songs and the colonial era are 
studied, followed by the role of black Americans in the music 
and culture of the Revolutionary and Civil War periods. The 
evolution of the spirituals, minstrel songs and ragtime as they 
relate to dance forms are examined along with the role of 
blacks as performers and composers in classical music and 
music of the theater. The final section studies the blues as it 
evolves into jazz, soul, reggae, funk, disco and rap. This course 
takes a look at racism and issues of gender in America, and 
how musicians of diverse backgrounds have collaborated and 
contributed to the evolution of American music despite preju- 
dice and adversity. This course meets the diversity require- 
ment. 3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



83 



MU 120 The History of Song (H) 

This course examines the history of our most popular modern 
music, the song. We study historical antecedents from the 
international genres of the Middle Ages through to early Twen- 
tieth Century popular song. We then explore the most popular 
songwriters/performers of our recent generations influenced 
by folk, country, jazz, and popular elements, such as Joan 
Baez, Bob Dylan, Billy Joel, Barbra Streisand, Bette Midler, 
Dolly Parton, Bonnie Raitt, Michael Bolton. Natalie Cole, Whitney 
Houston, The Beatles, Chicago, Manhattan Transfer, etc. No 
prerequisites. 3 credits 



A. Music Theory 

MU 157 Introduction to the Music Industry (A) 

This course introduces the student to the various aspects of 
the music industry. We discuss the history and process behind 
the creation, manufacture, and distribution of pre-recorded 
music. The course covers the earliest record companies, 
changes in the technology, and the growing awareness and 
sophistication of both the consumer and the artists, as well as 
the function of managers, attorneys, musicians and agents in 
the music industry. 3 credits 

MU 158 Introduction to Recording Techniques (A) 

The course demonstrates and emphasizes the physics and 
theory of acoustical sound in both a studio and live environ- 
ment and enables the student recording engineer the ability to 
capture that sound into a high quality recording environment. 
The student learns the fundamentals of recording equipment, 
such as microphone placement, dynamic processors, echo, 
delay, reverb, equalizers, and the mixing console with result 
being the ability to organize, set-up, and administer a recording 
session. The course may be clustered with both a physics and 
a music course as an interdisciplinary component. The port- 
ability of the equipment enables potential tie-ins to the Quick 
Center, Studio Arts, Theater, the Levee, and other campus 
events. Students of physics, music, theater, and studio arts 
might all benefit from this course. 3 credits 



IV. STUDIO ART 

Program Director: Eve Andree Laramee. MFA 



The Studio Art Program at Fairfield offers students an 
opportunity to explore all aspects of the visual arts 
through a curriculum designed to integrate with and 
expand upon their liberal arts education. Through a 
balance of theory, art history, concept development, 
and studio application, students explore art from the 
varying perspectives of visual and performance artist, 
scholar, critic, visionary and technician. 



84 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



The Studio Art Program has a range of goals 
including: 

• developing intuitive, creative, expressive, and aes- 
thetic faculties, and the ability to connect these with 
reasoning skills 

• developing perceptual, critical, and conceptual skills 

• cultivating empathy, sensibility, and discernment 

• training and disciplining the body to express indi- 
vidual form, style, and meaning 

• developing knowledge of major artistic achieve- 
ments in Western and non-Western visual arts 

• communicating knowledge and arguments clearly, 
concisely, and forcefully, both in written and oral 
forms 

• cultivating a deep commitment to and curiosity 
about the intellectual and creative life 

• encouraging students to take advantage of the 
world-class museums in Connecticut and New 
York City 

The Studio Art Program is divided into three develop- 
mental areas: Foundation Studios, Advanced Studios, 
and Capstone Studios. 

The Foundation Studios are recommended as a 
basis for all other studio art courses. They aim to 
develop formal, technical, expressive, and problem- 
solving skills. They stress knowledge of modern and 
contemporary art and provide a survey of artistic 
disciplines. Through these courses, students begin to 
investigate visual thinking. 

The Advanced Studios build upon the foundation 
studios and focus on a particular discipline, such as 
sculpture, Students develop a formal vocabulary, vi- 
sual sensitivity, and manipulative skills. Materials and 
historical concerns are integral parts of directed and 
individual investigations. 

In the Capstone Studios, students pull together the 
diverse experiences and knowledge they have ac- 
quired as studio art majors and focus their newly 
acquired skills on a specific problem or area of artistic 
research. In addition to creating this visual work, 
students read and discuss seminal texts of art theory 
and probe topics such as postmodernism and the 
personal and societal values implicit in an artwork. 
Capstone experiences develop creative autonomy. 
Students who complete the capstone studios are no 
longer dependent upon externally supplied assign- 
ments; they are able to focus upon artistic questions of 
their own. These courses are excellent preparation for 
life after Fairfield. 



Visual & Performing Arts 

Students interested in the Studio Art major or minor 
should consult with the Studio Art Program director 
before beginning the program. We encourage stu- 
dents to declare the major officially no later than the 
end of the sophomore year of studies. Transfer credits 
in Studio Art must be approved by the Studio Program 
Director. Advanced Placement credits will not be ac- 
cepted. Intersession courses may not count for the 
Studio Art major or minor. Evening courses may count 
with permission of Department Chair. There is a $35 
laboratory fee for each studio art course. Courses in 
the Lorenzo de'Medici Program or other study abroad 
programs must be approved by the Studio Program 
Director for studio credit for majors and minors. 

Students must satisfy the following requirements 
for 33 credits (11 courses): 



All four Foundation Studios: 

SA 10 Foundation: Interpreting the Self 

SA 11 Foundation: Structure, Space, 



3 credits 



and Environment 


3 credits 


SA12 Foundation: Drawing 


3 credits 


SA 13 Foundation: Figure Drawing 


3 credits 


Subtotal Studio Art credits 


12 credits 


At least three of the following Advanced Studios: 


First Level 




SA130 Painting I 


3 credits 


SA131 Printmaking: Intaglio 


3 credits 


SA132 Sculpture I 


3 credits 


SA133 Photography I 


3 credits 


SA 134 Printmaking: Screen Printing 


3 credits 


SA 136 Investigation of Text & Image 


3 credits 


SA137 Time Arts 


3 credits 


SA 138 Printmaking: Digital Imaging 


3 credits 


Second Level 




SA230 Painting II 


3 credits 


SA231 Printmaking II 


3 credits 


SA232 Sculpture II 


3 credits 


SA233 Photography II 


3 credits 


SA 235 Advanced Drawing 


3 credits 


Subtotal Studio Art credits 


9 credits 


Both Capstone Studios: 




SA 300 Junior Seminar 


3 credits 


SA301 Senior Seminar 


3 credits 


Subtotal Studio Art credits 


6 credits 



At least two art history courses: 6 credits 

(AH 175 required. AH 10. 11. or 12 

is recommended) 

Subtotal Studio Art credits 6 credits 

Total: 33 credits 



Visual & Performing Arts 

Students are encouraged to take more than the 33 

credits required for the major. Other 

include: 

Concept Exploration Elect ives: 

SA105 Color Workshop 

SA106 Painterly Prints 

SA 107 Special Workshop Studios 

Special Topics Electives: 

SA 302 Independent Study 

SA 304 Studio Internships 



sibilities 


1 




2. 




3. 


3 credits 


4. 


3 credits 


5. 


3 credits 


6. 




7. 


3 credits 


8. 


3 credits 


9. 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 
General Electives (9 Courses) 

□ a 

-I 1 

i n 

1 1 

-I -J 

□ n 

3 "I 

□ "I 

□ 1 



85 



Students planning to complete the minor must 
satisfy the following requirements for 18 credits 
(6 courses): 

Three Foundation Studios: 

SA10. SA11 6 credits 

and either SA 1 2 or SA 1 3 3 credits 

Two Advanced Studios: 6 credits 

A minimum of one course in Art History: 

(AH 175, 10, 11 or 12 is recommended) 



Total: 



Visual & Performing Arts 

— Studio Arts Concentration 

Fairfield 
University 
11 Courses Required (33 credits) 
SA10 Found.: Interp. Self 3 
SA 11 Found.: Structure 3 
SA 12 Found.: Drawing 3 
SA 13 Found.: Figure Draw 3 

3 Advanced Studio Courses 
SA 3 



3 credits 
18 credits 



Transfer 

3 

3 
3 
3 



SA 


□ 

3 

3 
3 


3 


SA 


3 


2 Capstone Studio Courses 
SA 300 
SA 301 

2 Art History Courses 
AH 


3 
3 

3 


AH 


3 



FOUNDATION STUDIOS 

SA 10 Foundation: Interpreting the Self 

This course is designed to develop fundamental studio skills 
and an understanding of visual thought processes. Emphasis 
is placed on concepts, contemporary art and theory, and a wide 
variety of materials and aesthetic categories such as drawing, 
painting, book arts, sculpture, and installation. Students inves- 
tigate the ways in which visual thinking can be used to realize 
an awareness of one's self. Through the themes of line and the 
self, the course exposes students to the visual languages of 
both abstraction and representation, and emphasizes the 
honing of perceptions, the process of selection and organiza- 
tion, and the seemingly constant revision and decision making 
involved in art making. The foundation courses are recom- 
mended as a basis for all other studio art courses. Typically 
offered both semesters, 
(formerly listed as SA 100) 3 credits 

SA11 Foundation: 

Structure, Space and Environment 

This course is designed to develop fundamental studio skills 
and an understanding of visual thought processes. Emphasis 
is placed on concepts, contemporary art and theory, and a wide 
variety of materials and aesthetic categories including draw- 
ing, collage, photography and photographic transfers, sculp- 
tural construction and installation. Students investigate the 
ways in which visual thinking can be used to realize an 
awareness of the world outside oneself. Through the themes of 
space and the world, the course exposes students to the visual 
languages of both abstraction and representation, and empha- 
size the honing of perceptions, the process of selection, orga- 
nization, and the seemingly constant revision and decision 
making involved in art making. Over the semester, we define 
the world\n many ways, but most generally the term describes 
that which is not the self. The foundation courses are recom- 
mended as a basis for all other studio art courses. Typically 
offered both semesters, 
(formerly listed as SA 102) 3 credits 



86 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Visual & Performing Arts 



SA12 Foundation: Drawing 

This course focuses on the act of seeing and its intimate 
connection with mark-making. Experiences are designed to 
develop observational, expressive and conceptual skills. Stu- 
dents explore the formal elements of drawing, such as line, 
value, composition, and form, and how they can be used to 
express an awareness of one's self and of the world around 
one. A variety of materials and processes are explored through 
in and out-of-class projects. Students participate in critiques of 
these projects and, through writing and speaking, develop a 
language of aesthetic awareness and a sense of artistic qual- 
ity. Typically offered both semesters, 
(formerly listed as SA 120) 3 credits 

SA 13 Foundation: Figure Drawing 

This course is an introduction to drawing from the human figure 
using a wide variety of media and techniques. Emphasis is 
placed on understanding, interpretation and expressive use of 
the figure in contemporary studio practice. Proportion and form 
are discovered through line, value, perspective, anatomical 
studies, and analysis of structure. Students participate in 
critiques of their projects and. through writing and speaking, 
develop a language of aesthetic awareness and a sense of 
artistic quality. Typically offered fall semester, 
(formerly listed as SA 1 1 1 ) 3 credits 



CONCEPT EXPLORATION ELECTIVES 

SA 105 Color Workshop 

This course is an investigation of fundamental color theory 
through studio projects using contemporary and art historical 
references. Students focus on the development and explora- 
tion of ideas using a variety of color media. Students study the 
practical mixing and application of pigments. Perception, vi- 
sual awareness, sensitivity, attitude, and judgment are all 
stressed. Typically offered fall semester, 
(formerly listed as SA 1 1 0) 3 credits 

SA 106 Painterly Prints 

A painterly approach to the intaglio process through collagraphs, 
large-scale color monotypes, and collage. Growth of imagery 
and technique as well as an emphasis on context is encour- 
aged through the medium. Typically offered every other spring 
semester, 
(formerly listed as SA 1 1 2) 3 credits 

SA107 Special Workshop Studios 

This course focuses on diversity in contemporary studio 
practice through the unique approaches of individual visiting 
artists. Projects, lectures, and critiques are scheduled, 
(formerly listed as SA 225) 3 credits 

NOTE: To enroll in any studio art course numbered 
SA 130 or higher, students are advised to complete 
at least one of the introductory courses: SA 10, 11, 
12, or 13. 



ADVANCED STUDIOS 

FIRST LEVEL 

SA 130 Painting I 

This course is an introduction to the methods, techniques, and 
language of oil painting. Students explore principles of color, 
construction, paint handling, delineation of form and space, 
light and shadow, surface, texture, and composition. Students 
paint primarily from observation and employ both representa- 
tional and abstract modes. Materials and historical concerns 
are integral parts of directed and individual investigations. 
SA 12 is highly recommended as a basis for this course. 
Typically offered both semesters, 
(formerly listed as SA 1 21 ) 3 credits 

SA132 Sculpture I 

An introduction to three-dimensional form and space. A broad- 
spectrum studio encompassing the diversity of contemporary 
sculptural activities, including objects, installations, and site 
work. Specific concepts presented by the instructor are inves- 
tigated using a variety of materials including wood, metal, 
plaster, clay, cement, screening, plastics, and fabric. Either 
SA 10 or SA 11 is highly recommended as a basis for this 
course. Typically offered both semesters, (formerly listed as 
SA123) 

3 credits 

SA133 Photography I 

Basic techniques of black-and-white photography, including 
negative exposure, film development and print production. 
Development of concepts and theory in photography; relation- 
ship of photography to other visual media and study of both 
historical and contemporary precedents. Either SA 1 or SA 1 1 
is highly recommended as a basis for this course. Typically 
offered both semesters, 
(formerly listed as SA 124) 3 credits 



SECOND LEVEL 

SA232 Sculpture II 

This course builds on the experience of Sculpture I and 
stresses the advanced development of technical and expres- 
sive skills. Focus is on the generation of ideas as a central 
component in sculpture. Individual direction is developed in 
consultation with the instructor. Individual and group criticism. 
Typically offered spring semester. (Prerequisite: SA 132) 
(formerly listed as SA 223) 3 credits 

SA 233 Photography II 

This course is designed to build upon the fundamentals of 
black-and-white photography. Advanced exposure controls 
are covered as well as an introduction to shooting color 
transparencies and exploration of mural-size format and mixed 
media techniques. Emphasis is given to the generation of ideas 
as the central component in the process of photography. 
Typically offered spring semester. (Prerequisite: SA 133) 
(formerly listed as SA 224) 3 credits 



Visual & Performing Arts 

SA 235 Advanced Drawing 

This course builds upon the experience of Foundation: Draw- 
ing and stresses advanced development of skills. Focus is on 
the generation of ideas as a central component in the process 
of drawing. Emphasis is on individual direction and inventive 
drawing through studio projects developed in consultation with 
the instructor. Individual and group criticism. Typically offered 
spring semester. (Prerequisite: SA 12) (formerly listed as SA 
220) 3 credits 



87 



SPECIAL TOPICS ELECTIVES 

SA 302 Independent Study 

By arrangement with studio faculty, juniors and seniors may 
choose to work independently on specific studio projects. 
Progress is reviewed through individual critiques. Readings 
and discussions of contemporary and art historical issues are 
a regular part of the course. Independent studies must be 
finalized with the studio program director by the midpoint of the 
preceding semester. 3 credits 

SA 304 Studio Internships 

An opportunity for students who have completed at least three 
studio courses and whose academic work has prepared them 
for professional work related to the major. With faculty spon- 
sorship and departmental approval, students may design in- 
ternships as studio assistants to professional artists or work in 
museums, galleries, or professional print shops in the metro- 
politan and regional areas. Internships are developed by the 
student in consultation with the supervising professor. Intern- 
ships must be finalized with the studio program director by the 
midpoint of the preceding semester. 3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 

III. NEW MEDIA, FILM, 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 

Program Director: James Mayzik, S.J. 



The New Media Film, Television and Radio Minor 
provides a coherent awareness of the aesthetic, artis- 
tic and communicative power of these varied media by 
offering courses in theory, history, genres, styles and 
structures with hands-on production courses. The 
program curriculum reflects the convergence of tradi- 
tional media of film, television and radio into a new 
media of creative possibilities. Students learn the 
theory and collaborative practice of all aspects of 
visual storytelling: writing, moving image design, pro- 
ducing, directing, cinematography, sound design, digital 
imaging, and editing. We want our students to under- 
stand the expressive power of these media, and to 
experiment with their own creative voice, engaging 
their imagination and intellect with the tools of these 
crafts. Many of our faculty come from the ranks of 
working professionals, ensuring that information trans- 
mitted in the classroom is at the cutting edge of the 
field. 

New Media courses focus on new digital technologies 
as they relate to the sound and moving image of film, 
television and video. Nonlinear narrative theory and 
technique, computergraphics,2-D and 3-D animation, 
multimedia network communications. CD-ROM and 
DVD production are featured. 

Film track courses survey the origins and develop- 
ment of motion picture art. analyze periods, genres 
and styles of filmmaking, and offer hands-on experi- 
ence of film production technique. In the production 
courses, students are introduced to the collaborative, 
creative process of filmmaking, with an emphasis on 
storytelling through a broad spectrum of aesthetic 
approaches. Student films produced in the production 
courses are showcased in a campus film festival, and 
are web streamed over the university web page. 

Television track courses survey the technological 
and stylistic history of the medium; the particular visual 
and audio language of television texts; the genres, 
narrative and generic conventions of television; and 
hands-on production experience designed to teach 
skills in studio and remote television production. In the 
production courses, students produce programs of a 
variety of familiar genres but are encouraged to push 
the creative boundaries of the medium. Student pro- 
grams are aired on a regular nightly schedule on the 
HAM Channel, the student broadcast TV station, and 
are web-streamed. 



88 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Visual & Performing Arts 



Radio track courses survey the programmatic and 
technical development of the medium; sound develop- 
ment and recording techniques; and broadcast pro- 
duction and management. Production courses con- 
tribute programming to WVOF, the university FM sta- 
tion, and to its web streaming address. 



Program Detail 

The program includes six courses, or 18 credits. 

I. Foundational Course (three credits) 

TL 1 00 Introduction to the Visual Arts of 

New Media Film. Television & Radio 



Beyond TL 100. students are required to complete a 
choice of five courses within the Film. Television or 
Radio tracks: 

II. Film History/Theory or 
Television History/Theory or 
Radio History/Theory 

At least two required courses, six credits— and no 
more than nine credits— in the chosen track: 

Film Track 

FM101 Art of Film 
FM102 Filmmaker Studies 
FM 103 American Decades 
FM104 World Cinema 
FM 110 Special Topics in Film 

Television Track 

TL101 Art and Language of Television 

TL 102 Television Drama 

TL103 Documentary Television 

TL104 Television Comedy 

TL 105 Directing for Film and Television 

TL106 Art of Editing 

TL 1 1 Special Topics in Television 

Radio Track 

RA101 Art and Language of Radio 
RA102 Radio Drama 
RA103 Documentary Radio 
RA 1 10 Special Topics in Radio 



III. New Media Film, Television 
or Radio Production 

Two required courses, six credits— in the chosen 
track: 

FM130 Filmmaking I 

FM 131 Nonlinear Editing 

EM 132 Performance for Camera 

FM 230 Filmmaking II 

FM 231 Film Internship 

TL 130 HAM Television Production I 

TL 131 Digital Graphics for Film and Television 

TL 230 HAM Television Production II 

TL231 Television Internship 

RA130 Radio Production I 
RA230 Radio Production II 
RA231 Radio Internship 



IV. One Elective Course 

An additional (sixth) course, from either the History/ 
Theory or the Production areas, completes the six 
course requirements for the minor. 

With the approval of the Director, students may 'cross 
track' to take courses in which they are particularly 
interested. 



PROGRAM SUMMARY 

TL 100 Intro to Visual Arts 

Film, TV & Radio 
FilmATV/Radio HistoryATheory 
Film/TV/Radio Production 
Elective 

(either Hi story /Theory or Production) 
TOTAL 6 courses (18 Credits) 



1 course (3 credits) 
2 courses (6 credits) 
2 courses (6 credits) 

1 course (3 credits) 



Visual & Performing Arts 

FM 103 American Decades (H) 

This course focuses on alternating decades in the first 100 
years of American film. Hollywood and independent films are 
analyzed with respect to genres, styles, acting, and their 
relationship to American history and culture. The course fulfills 
a history requirement of the Visual and Performing Arts core 
requirements. 3 credits 

FM 104 World Cinema (H) 

A historical and critical survey of film from world nations, such 
as French new wave films by filmmakers like Truffaut. Godard 
and Chabrol; German cinema including Fassbinder, Wenders, 
Herzog and von Trotta; Japanese films of Kinugasa, Mizoguchi, 
Ozu, and Kurosawa, Yanagimchi, and Itami are studied. Films 
from Italy, China, Russia and third world countries are studied 
within the cultural, historical, and political environment of their 
time. The course fulfills a history requirement of the Visual and 
Performing Arts core requirements. 3 credits 

FM 110 Special Topics in Film (H) 

Courses in this area cover a range of topics— genres or themes 
such as film noir, the horrorfilm, the musical, documentary film, 
the Western— and are offered on a rotating basis each semes- 
ter. This course fulfills a history requirement of the Visual and 
Performing Arts core requirements. 3 credits 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



89 



TL 102 Television Drama (H) 

The history of dramatic form in the television medium, including 
early teleplays, the development of the dramatic series, the 
soap opera, and narrative films for television, is studied. The 
course covers the unique characteristics of the medium as it 
applies to drama, the special qualifications and pressures 
applied to drama for broadcast consumption, and the staging 
and aesthetic differences between drama for film and drama 
for television, e.g. different directing and acting technique. The 
course treats television drama as a viable and substantive 
genre, not simply a form of popular entertainment. This course 
fulfills a history requirement of the Visual and Performing Arts 
core requirements, and a history/theory requirement for the 
television track of the minor. 3 credits 

TL 104 Television Comedy (H) 

Television comedy has its roots and parallels in theater, radio 
and film, and this course traces the development of the come- 
dic form from the early days of television to the present. Topics 
include the development of the three-camera format for sitcoms, 
the rise and fall of variety formats, comedic casts. British 
imports, late night entertainment, and political comedy. Script- 
ing, camera, lighting and editing techniques are analyzed. The 
course fulfills a history requirement of the Visual and Perform- 
ing Arts core requirements, and a history/theory requirement 
for the television track of the minor. 

3 credits 



Gain credit 
for non-college learning: 

• CLEP (College Level Examination Program) 

• Excelsior Examination 

• Portfolio for Life 

• Experience Learning 



Student Support Seminars 
available free of charge! 



Taking Effective Lecture Notes 



RM5 

RM 52 Developing Exam Strategies 
RM 55 Credit for Life Experience 



90 



Arts & Sciences Academic Programs 



Women's Studies 



Women's Studies 



Directors: Sally O'Driscoll, Ph.D. 
Rose Rodrigues, Ph.D. 



Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program that 
focuses on two levels of inquiry, the theoretical and the 
experiential. Women's Studies demonstrates the ways 
in which cultural assumptions about gender influence 
the development of personal identity and public roles 
that consequently affect all social and political struc- 
tures. By examining women's contributions in such 
fields as social science, natural science, the arts, 
business and literature, the goal of the Women's 
Studies minor is to explore the experience of women 
of all cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds. The 
program allows female and male students to focus on 
issues of diversity and alternative perspectives. 

The 18-credit minor in Women's Studies requires 
completion of: 

1. Five courses, three of which must be gender- 
focused, and two others, which may be gender- 
focused or gender-component courses. 

2. Women's Studies Capstone Seminar, WS 301. 
To be taken after completion of other courses. 

Courses must be chosen from a variety of fields and 
disciplines. At least one of the five courses must deal 
with issues of race, class and ethnicity as well as 
gender. 

A list of gender-focused and gender-component courses 
is available from the Program Director. 

Courses taken to fulfill Arts and Sciences core require- 
ments may be used to fulfill requirements for the minor 
with the permission of the director of the minor program. 




WS 101 Women: The Second Sex? 

This is an introductory course that explores fundamental is- 
sues in feminism through the lens of various academic disci- 
plines. 3 credits 

WS 301 Women's Studies Capstone Seminar 

This is the final course in the minor sequence, to be taken in the 
student's junior or senior year after the other five courses have 
been completed. The goal of this course is to integrate feminist 
approaches across the disciplines, emphasizing the relation- 
ship between theory and practice. Students undertake an 
independent project (either research or a community-based 
project or internship), which will culminate in a major paper. 
Open to seniors only, or juniors with the permission of the 
program director. 3 credits 



BUSINESS 



Majors & Course Descriptions 









i/ d- Business Academic Programs 

Charles F. Dolan 
School of Business 

Dean: Norman A. Solomon, Ph.D. 



Students in the Charles F. Dolan School of Business 
take the general education core curriculum required of 
all undergraduate students, thus ensuring their receiv- 
ing a broad knowledge of the humanities, mathematics, 
social sciences, and natural sciences. In addition, stu- 
dents take a business core curriculum of subjects which 
provide an introduction to the fields of accounting, 
statistics, legal environment of business, business eth- 
ics, computer-based information systems, as well as a 
unique, three-course sequence emphasizing the impor- 
tant elements and the interdisciplinary relationships of 
organizational behavior, production and operations, fi- 
nance, marketing and international business with em- 
phasis on policy and strategic development, particularly 
in the international setting. The courses create an un- 
derstanding of the interrelationships of the functional 
areas in the management of the firm. 

The balance of the program will depend on the major — 
accounting, finance, information systems, management, 
marketing, or international business in the International 
Studies program — but in every case, it will be a tailor- 
made program designed jointly by the student and a 
faculty advisor. Minors are available to all students in the 
University in: finance, information systems, manage- 
ment, marketing, international business, business law 
and ethics, and operations management. All members 
of the business faculty have substantial business expe- 
rience, which makes them invaluable guides in the 
choice of a course of study that will further the student's 
specific career goals. The combination of the general 
education and business cores with the courses within 
the major areas of study facilitate the student's develop- 
ment of a flexibility of mind which is an invaluable asset 
for the executive. 

Students are motivated to continue to grow intellectually 
and be prepared for graduate study. A broad perspec- 
tive of society and the proper role of business based 
upon an appropriate set of moral values is emphasized. 
In consultation with faculty, each student follows an 
approved curriculum which reflects an integrated ap- 
proach to the study of modern management as well as 
the student's own career objectives. 



General Information 




Students may transfer from the College of Arts and 
Sciences, School of Nursing, or School of Continuing 
Education into the Dolan School of Business if their 
overall grade point average is 2.80 or better. 



General Information 
Major Areas of Study 

ACCOUNTING 

Rosalie McDevitt, MBA, CPA, program director 
Accounting majors will take courses that will qualify 
them to take the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) 
exam. They also may take courses appropriate for 
careers in private accounting, internal auditing, govern- 
ment and not-for-profit accounting. Many students find 
that undergraduate studies in accounting are excellent 
preparation for a wide range of corporate positions. 

FINANCE 

Gregory Koutmas, PhD, program director 
Finance majors will study the theory and practice of 
financial management. Additionally, they will analyze 
actual case histories of the financial operations of sev- 
eral different companies. The courses included in this 
major area prepare students to enter into financial 
management positions with either corporate or govern- 
mental organizations. 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
R. Keith Martin, PhD, program director 
Information Systems majors will study, in this computer- 
based program, the analysis, design, development, and 
management of information systems in organizations. 
They will develop an understanding of the needs of 
information, its use in the decision making process, and 
the procedures by which information is provided to 
management. 

MANAGEMENT 

Lucy Katz, JD, program director 
Management majors will study both the theory and the 
practice of management. Emphasis is given to the 
nature of the management function and to the behav- 
ioral, social, and environmental factors which influence 
effective organization and managerial performance. 
Research efforts in the field are examined to develop 
fundamental principles and concepts which can serve 
as a rational basis for managerial action. 

MARKETING 

Arjun Chaudhuri, PhD, program director 
Marketing majors will study the theory and practice of 
the flow of goods and services from producer to con- 
sumer. In a sense, it is the most humanistic of the 
business majors; it requires students to understand 
consumer behavior, the motivation of sales personnel, 
the impact of advertising and communication on the 
potential consumer, the characteristics of consumers, 
the cultures involved in international marketing, and 
market research techniques. 



93 



Business Academic Programs 

Fast-Track to MBA Program 

See Bachelor of Professional Studies on page 27. 

Minor Areas of Study 

Minor in General Business 

BU 100, 200, and any three courses in Business. 

Minor in Business Law, Regulation and Ethics 
BU 11, AE291.BU/AE391. 
Three courses from the following, 
no more than two from each group. 
Group 1 - BU 220, 311,312, 320, 325. 330, 340, 

350, 360 
Group 2 - AE 281 , 282, 284, 295, 384 

Minor in Finance 

AC 11, BU 100 or IL 101 and Fl 210, 215. and 
two other finance courses from Fl 200, Fl 220. 
FI240, Fl 310, Fl 315. 

Minor in Information Systems 

IS 30, IS 230, BU 100 or IL 101, IS 310, and two 
IS electives. 

Minor in Management 

BU100orlL101,andMG235, 240 
and two 300 level management course. 

Minor in Marketing 

MK 211, 212, 311. Two marketing electives. 
Students from the College of Arts and Sciences 
should note that MA 1 7 is a prerequisite for MK 320. 
MA 17 may be substituted for one of the electives at 
the discretion of the area coordinator. 

Minor in Accounting 

AC 11, AC 12, AC 203, AC 204 

and one 300-level accounting elective course. 

Minor in Operations Management 
BU 100, 200; MG 210. 225 
One course from accounting or business law or 
finance or information systems or international 
business or management or marketing or MG 397- 
398. 



94 



Business Academic Programs 



Core Curriculum Guide 



School of Continuing Education Core Curriculum 

for Business Majors 





Fairfield 








Fairfield 






University 


Transfer 






University 


Transfer 


HUMANITIES (12 courses) 






MATH & SCIENCE 


(4 courses) 




English 11 


□ 


□ 


1 Math & 1 Science 


required: 




English 12 


□ 





Biology 
Chemistry 




D 




Ethics (AE 291) 


D 


□ 


Physics 




D 


□ 


History 30 


□ 





*Math 17 




D 


□ 


History 


□ 


D 


*Math19 




O 


□ 


Philosophy 


□ 


n 






D 




Religious Studies 


□ 


D 






Visual & Performing Arts 


D 









Visual & Performing Arts 






* Required 








Lecture 





B 










Humanities Electives: 






BUSINESS CORE 








1. 


D 


□ 


AC 11 




D 


D 


2. 


□ 


□ 


AC 12 




D 


O 


3 


□ 


n 


BU11 
IS 100 
BU 100(4) 




D 
D 
D 


O 
D 
□ 


SOCIAL SCIENCE (4 course; 




BU 200 (4) 
BU225 




D 


a 


Select from 2 disciplines: 








□ 


□ 


*Economics 11 


□ 





BU 300 (4) 




n 


a 


*Economics 12 


□ 


D 










Politics 


□ 





CS (133 or higher) 
OR 




a 


□ 


Psychology 


D 


D 


MA 121 or MA 27o 


•217 


□ 


□ 


Sociology 


D 




























REQUIRED: 1 


US Diversity course 










1 World Diversity course 



Business Academic Programs 



95 



Curriculum Guide 

Accounting 





Fairfield 




Fairfield 






University 


Transfer 


University 


Transfer 


BUSINESS CORE 






BUSINESS ELECTIVE 




(9 courses/30 credits) 






1. 3 


3 


AC 11 Prin. of Acct. I 


□ 


O 






AC 12 Prin. of Acct. II 


a 


□ 


FREE ELECTIVES 




BU 11 Legal Env. Bus. 


□ 


□ 


1. □ 


3 


IS 100 Intro to Comp. 


□ 


a 


2. n 


3 


BU 100 Decision Mkg. (4) 


□ 


a 


3. D 


3 


BU 200 Comp Advan. (4) 


□ 


□ 


4. □ 


3 


BU 225 Bus. Processes 


a 


□ 






BU 300 Bus. Glob. Env. (4) 


a 


□ 


MINIMUM 2.5 GPA REQUIRED 




CS 133 (or higher) 


□ 


a 


IN ACCOUNTING MAJOR 




OR 










MA 121 or MA 27 or 217 (3) 


□ 


a 






MAJOR 










(6 courses) 










AC 203 Interm. Acct. I 


a 


□ 






AC 204 Interm. Acct. II 


□ 


□ 






AC 310 Advanced Acct. 


D 


n 






AC 320 Cost Accounting 


3 


a 






AC 330 Auditing 


□ 


a 






AC 343 Fed. Income Tax. 


□ 


a 







96 



Business Academic Programs 



Curriculum Guide 

Finance 





Fairfield 






Fairfield 






University 


Transfer 




University 


Transfer 


BUSINESS CORE 

AC 11 Prin. of Acct. I 


□ 


□ 


2 MAJOR ELECTIVES 

1. Fl 
? Fl 




3 
3 


AC 12 Prin. of Acct. II 
BU 11 Legal Env. Bus. 






IS 100 Intro to Comp. 


□ 


□ 








BU 100 Decision Mkg (4) 


3 


3 


1 BUSINESS ELECTIVE 






BU 200 Comp Advan. (4) 


3 


3 


1 


□ 


3 


BU 225 Bus. Processes 


3 


3 








BU 300 Bus. Glob. Env. (4) 


3 


3 


FREE ELECTIVES 






CS 133 (or higher) 


3 


3 


1 


□ 


3 


OR 






? 


□ 


3 


MA 121 orMA27or217 


3 


3 


3 


□ 


3 








4 


□ 


3 


MAJOR 












(6 courses) 












4 required courses 












AC 203 Interm. Acct. I 


3 


3 








Fl 210 Prin. of Investments 


3 


3 








Fl 215 Fin. Management 


3 


3 








Fl 330 Case Studies in Fin. 


3 


□ 









Business Academic Programs 



97 



Curriculum Guide 

Information Systems & Operations Management 





Fairfield 






Fairfield 






University 


Transfer 




University 


Transfer 


BUSINESS CORE 






2 MAJOR ELECTIVES 






AC 11 Prin. of Acct. I 


□ 


3 


1. IS/OM 


3 


□ 


AC 12 Prin. of Acct. II 


"I 


3 


2. IS/OM 


3 


□ 


BU 11 Legal Env. Bus. 


□ 


3 








IS 100 Intro to Comp. 


□ 


3 


1 BUSINESS ELECTIVE 






BU 100 Decision Mkg (4) 


□ 


3 


1 


3 


□ 


BU 200 Comp Advan. (4) 


□ 


3 








BU 225 Bus. Processes 
BU 300 Bus. Glob. Env. (4) 


3 


3 
3 


FREE ELECTIVES 

1 


□ 




CS 133 (or higher) 


3 


3 


2. 


□ 


OR 

MA 121 or MA 27 or 217 


3 


3 


3 

4. 


3 

3 


3 


MAJOR 












(6 courses) 












4 required courses 












IS 230 Info Sys & Op Mgmt 


3 


3 








IS 240 Systems Design 


3 


3 








IS 310 Systems in Orgs. 


3 


3 








IS 395 Systems Project 


3 


3 









98 



Business Academic Programs 



Curriculum Guides 

Management 





Fairfield 




Fairfield 






University 


Transfer 


University 


Transfer 


BUSINESS CORE 

(30 credits) 






TRACK - A 












AC 11 Prin. of Acct. I 
AC 12 Prin. of Acct. II 






BUSINESS & SOCIETY TRACK 

(3 courses) 




BU 11 Legal Env. Bus. 


□ 


D 


MG 240 Lead. & Mng. 




IS 100 Intro to Comp. 


□ 


3 


People for 21 st Century 3 


3 


BU 100 Decision Mkg (4) 


□ 


O 


MG 235 Mng. Human Res. 




BU 200 Comp. Advan. (4) 


3 


n 


for Comp. Adv. □ 


3 


BU 225 Bus. Processes 


n 





MG 340, MG 345 




BU 300 Bus. Glob. Env. (4) 


3 





Act. Lrn. Mod. □ 


3 


CS 133 (or higher) 


3 


3 






OR 

MA 121 or MA 27 or 217 


3 


O 


BUSINESS & SOCIETY ELECTIVES 

(3 courses) 

1 n 


3 


FREE ELECTIVES 
1. 


3 





? n 
s n 


3 
3 


2. 


3 


3 


AE/BU391.BU 120, BU 220, 




3. 


3 


3 


BU 325, BU 320, MG 301 , MG 320 




4. 


3 


3 


BUSINESS ELECTIVE 










1 


3 


3 



Business Academic Programs 



99 



Curriculum Guides 

Management 



Fairfield 




Fairfield 






University 


Transfer 




Univ( 


jrsity 


Transfer 


TRACK - B 




TRACK - C 






GENERAL MA 


NAGEMENT TRACK 


HUMAN RESOURCES TRACK 




(3 courses) 




(3 courses) 






MG 240 Lead. & Mng. 




MG 240 Lead. & Mng. 






People for 21 st Century 3 


□ 


People for 21 st Century 3 




□ 


MG 235 Mng. Human Res. 




MG 235 Mng. Human Res. 






for Comp. Adv. 3 


3 


for Comp. Adv. 3 




3 


MG 340, MG 345 




MG 340, MG 345 






Act. Lrn. Mod 


3 


3 


Act. Lrn. Mod 


3 




3 



BUSINESS & SOCIETY ELECTIVE 

(1 course) 

1 3 

AE/BU391, BU220, MG 320, 
BU 325, BU 320, MG 301 



BUSINESS & SOCIETY ELECTIVES 

(1 course) 

1 □ 

BU 320, BU 325, 

MG 300. MG 320. MG 350. MG 355 



HUMAN RESOURCES ELECTIVE 

(1 course) 

1. □ 

MG 3xx, MG 370, 
MG 302. MG 300 



HUMAN RESOURCES ELECTIVES 

(2 courses) 

1. 3 

2. □ 

MG 370, MG 302. MG 380 



MANAGEMENT ELECTIVE 

(1 course) 

1. 3 



BUSINESS ELECTIVE 

1. 



BUSINESS ELECTIVES 

1 3 

2 3 



100 



Business Academic Programs 



Curriculum Guides 

Marketing 



BUSINESS ELECTIVE 





Fairfield 






Fairfield 






University 


Transfer 






University 


Transfer 


BUSINESS CORE 


TRACK - A 






(30 credits) 








AC 11 Prin.of Acct. I 


a 


□ 


GENERAL MARKETING TRACK 




AC 12 Prin.of Acct. II 


□ 


O 


(4 required courses) 






BU 11 Legal Env. Bus. 


□ 


3 


MK211 Strat. Markt. PI. 


□ 


□ 


IS 100 Intro to Comp. 


□ 


3 


MK212 Consumer Behvr. 


□ 


3 


BU 100 Decision Mkg (4) 


□ 


3 


MK311 Mrkt. Research 


□ 


3 


BU 200 Comp. Advan. (4) 


□ 


3 


MK312 Intn'l Mrkt. 


□ 


3 


BU 225 Bus. Processes 


□ 


3 








BU 300 Bus. Glob. Env. (4) 


□ 


D 


MAJOR ELECTIVES 






CS 133 (or higher) 


□ 


3 


1. 


□ 


3 


OR 






2. 


□ 


3 


MA 121 or MA 27 or 217 (3) 


□ 


3 


MK221,MK32 


1, MK322, 







MK231.MK331, MK 332. 
MK241, MK341, MK 342 



3 



FREE ELECTIVES 

1. 


n 


□ 


? 


□ 


□ 


3. 


□ 


3 


4 


□ 


3 



Business Academic Programs 



101 



Curriculum Guides 

Marketing 





Fairfield 






Fairfield 








University 


Transfer 






University 
NG TRACK 


Transfer 


TRACK - B 




TRACK - C 






INTEGRATED 


MARKETING 


RELATIONSHIP MARKETI 




COMMUNICATIONS TRACK 




(4 required courses) 






(4 required courses) 






MK211 Strat. Markt. PI. 


□ 


□ 


MK211 Strat. Markt. PI. 


3 


□ 


MK212 Consumer Behvr. 


3 


□ 


MK212 Consumer Behvr. 


n 


3 


MK 31 1 Mrkt. Research 


3 


3 


MK311 Mrkt. Research 


D 


3 


MK312 Intn'l Mrkt. 


3 


3 


MK312 Intn'l Mrkt. 


D 


3 


MAJOR ELECTIVES 






MAJOR ELECTIVES 






1 


3 


3 


1. 


3 


3 


? 


3 


3 


? 




3 


3 


MK ??1 MK 3? 


1 MK 3?? 







MK221.MK322. MK331 



I \JC- Business Academic Programs 

Course Descriptions 



Accounting 

The following courses are usually offered through the 
School of Continuing Education. 

AC 11 Introduction to Financial Accounting 

Accounting has been called the "language of business." This 
course is designed to help students learn to speak this 
language by providing an introduction to the concepts and 
uses of financial accounting information in a business envi- 
ronment. The areas covered include measurement and valu- 
ation of assets and liabilities, the determination of net income 
and the preparation and analysis of basic financial state- 
ments. 3 credits 

AC 12 Introduction to Management Accounting 

Management accounting provides the information which is 
necessary to support managers' decisions. Relevant areas 
in the course will include cost flows, product costing, fore- 
casting, budgeting, and current management accounting 
concepts. Various skills valued by business managers will be 
included in the course. A minimum combined cumulative 
grade point average of 2.50 in AC 11 and AC 12 must be 
attained in order to take AC 203. (Prerequisite: AC 1 1 .) 

3 credits 

AC 203 Intermediate Accounting I 

This course emphasizes accounting theory and concepts and 
the presentation of financial statements in conformity with 
generally accepted accounting principles. The student is pre- 
sented with the various accounting procedures and valuations 
associated with the presentation and communication of finan- 
cial information. (Prerequisite: AC 12 with a minimum cumula- 
tive grade point average in AC 1 1 and AC 12 of 2.50.) 

3 credits 

AC 204 Intermediate Accounting II 

This course is a continuation of AC 203. The student covers 
such complex topics as pension plans, accounting for income 
taxes, lease transactions, dilutive securities and earnings per 
share and corporate investments. (Prerequisite: AC 203 with a 
minimum grade of C— and a 2.50 cumulative, grade point 
average in AC 1 1 and AC 12.) 3 credits 

AC 310 Advanced Accounting 

This course examines advanced areas in accounting theory 
and practice. Areas which will be examined include accounting 
for consolidated business activity and other business combina- 
tions, partnership formation and liquidation, bankruptcy, inter- 
national accounting and reporting, foreign statement transla- 
tion, the Securities Exchange Commission and other related 
topics. (Prerequisites: AC 204, a combined minimum cumula- 
tive grade point average of 2.50 in AC 203 and AC 204, and a 
2.50 cumulative grade point average in all accounting courses 
taken in the program.) 3 credits 



Accounting 

AC 320 Cost Accounting 

This course is concerned with the planning and control function 
of internal management in their decision-making capacity. The 
student should develop an understanding of the accumulation 
of product costs, behavior and allocation of costs, elements of 
forecasting and budget preparation, capital budgeting, and 
evaluation of segments through responsibilityaccounting. (Pre- 
requisites: AC 203 and permission of the Area Coordinator or 
AC 204 and a combined cumulative grade point average of 
2.50 in AC 203 and AC 204.) 3 credits 

AC 330 Auditing 

Auditors play an important role in society by lending credibility 
in financial accounting information. This course provides an 
introduction to the audit of financial statements by independent 
certified public accountants with an emphasis on auditing 
concepts and the underlying rationale for audit procedures. 
The course begins with audit planning, risk assessment, sam- 
pling, evidence evaluation, and performance of an audit and 
proceeds by exploring the professional and legal environment 
within which auditors operate. (Prerequisites: Senior standing, 
AC 204, a 2.50 cumulative quality point average in all account- 
ing courses taken in the program, and a combined minimum 
cumulative grade point average of 2.50 in AC 203 and AC 204.) 

3 credits 

AC 343 Federal Income Taxation I 

This course introduces students to income tax, adjusted gross 
income, deductions from adjusted gross income, itemized 
deductions, property transactions, filing status and exemp- 
tions, passive activity losses, tax credits and tax computations. 
Tax compliance and preparation considerations for individuals 
will also receive attention. (Prerequisites: Senior standing, AC 
204, a 2.50 cumulative grade point average in all accounting 
courses taken in the program and a combined minimum cumu- 
lative grade point average of 2.50 in AC 203 and AC 204.) 

3 credits 

AC 345 Federal Income Taxation II 

This course continues the study of taxation begun in AC 343 
Federal Taxation I. The topics will include formation of the 
corporate distributions, liquidations, reorganization. Personal 
Holding Companies, Subchapter S Corporations and Partner- 
ships will also receive attention. Tax return preparation and 
compliance as well as research and planning will be integrated 
throughout the courses. (Prerequisite: Senior standing, AC 
343, a 2.50 cumulative grade point average in all accounting 
courses taken in the program and a combined minimum cumu- 
lative grade point average of 2.50 in AC 203 and AC 204.) 

3 credits 

AC 350 Controllership 

This course provides an in-depth understanding of the 
controller's role and responsibilities. The course material cov- 
ers planning for control, accounting reports and interpreta- 
tions, tax administration and government reporting. (Prerequi- 
sites: AC 204, a 2.50 cumulative grade point average in all 
courses taken in the accounting program and a 2.50 combined 
cumulative grade point average in AC 203 and AC 204.) 

3 credits 



Accounting 

AC 365 Accounting Information Systems 

This course analyzes the methods used to capture, process, 
and communicate accounting information in a modern busi- 
ness enterprise. Students learn to document business transac- 
tion cycles using data flow diagrams and flowcharts. They 
analyze the accounting information system, identify weak- 
nesses, and recommend improvements to internal control. 
Students process accounting information through a modern 
database management application program such as a general 
ledger package or an enterprise resource planning system. 
(Prerequisite: AC 12.) 3 credits 



Business Academic Programs 



103 



BU 312 The Law of Business Organizations 
and Financial Transactions 

This course offers an analysis of legal principles related to the 
law of agency, proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, lim- 
ited liability companies, and other business forms. The second 
half of the course is devoted to the study of negotiable instru- 
ments, bank deposits and collections, suretyship, secured trans- 
actions, debtor-creditor relationships and bankruptcy. (Prereq- 
uisite: BU 11.) 3 credits 



Business Ethics 

AE 291 Ethics in Business Management 

An investigation of ethical problems in business practice. 
Topics include personal morality in profit-oriented enterprises; 
codes of ethics: obligations to employees and other stakehold- 
ers; truth in advertising, whistle-blowing and company loyalty; 
regulation, self and government; the logic and future of capital- 
ism. Junior standing. 3 credits 



Business Law 

BU 11 Legal Environment of Business 

This course is a basic study of the law, legal institutions, and the 
legal and social responsibility of business. Includes legal history 
and legal process, judicial systems, common law, statutes and 
regulations, with an emphasis on torts, contracts, antitrust and 
trade regulation, protection of the environment, worker safety, 
product liability, and corporate crime. 3 credits 

BU 220 Environmental Law and Policy 

This course surveys issues arising out of federal laws designed 
to protect the environment and manage resources. It considers 
in detail the role of the Environmental Protection Agency in the 
enforcement of environmental policies arising out of such laws 
as the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Water Act 
and Clear Air Act, among others. The impact of Congress, 
political parties, bureaucracy, and interest groups in shaping 
environmental policy is also considered. Special attention is 
given to the impact of environmental regulation on business and 
private property rights. 3 credits 

BU 311 The Law of Contracts, Sales and Property 

This course examines the components of common law and 
contracts, and also includes the concepts of assignment of 
rights, delegation of duties, and discharge of contracts. The 
course covers Articles 2 and 2A of the Uniform Commercial 
Code on leases, sales of goods and warranties. Topics in real 
and personal property as well as bailments are considered. 
(Prerequisite: BU 1 1 .) 3 credits 



Interdisciplinary Sequence of 
Business Fundamentals 

BU 100 Business Decision Making 

This is the first module of a three-semester course designed to 
introduce students to the principles of business management in 
the global environment. It focuses on the concepts which guide 
the decisions of enterprises on their goals, strategy, structure, 
and business operations. It discusses environmental analysis, 
evaluation of strengths and weaknesses, mission definition and 
other tools of the strategy development process of enterprises. 
Field projects are an integral element of course, with the object 
of giving students early exposure to real-world business opera- 
tions. 4 credits 

BU 200 Creating a Competitive Advantage 

This course builds on the foundations laid in BU 100 to discuss 
the imperative of creating a competitive advantage in the execu- 
tion of strategy. It examines the functions of the various business 
divisions - Production, Finance, Marketing. Accounting. Human 
Resources and Information Systems - in the development and 
implementation of strategy, and discusses the concepts relevant 
to their role in business operations. Field projects focus on 
exercises designed to provide practical experience of business 
operations. 4 credits 

BU 225 Business Processes and 
Information Technologies 

This course is intended to provide hands-on exposure to the 
kinds of analytical and professional skills needed for 
decisionmaking/management in a modern business enterprise. 
Topics include IT/IS infrastructures, business operations, data 
and process models, data collection & analysis, and technologi- 
cal risk assessment & reconciliation. Working in cross-functional 
project teams, students analyze situations drawn from an actual 
business model with supporting operational data. (Prerequi- 
sites: BU 200, IS 100.) 3 credits 

BU 300 Business Strategy in 
the Global Environment 

The apex course discusses business strategy and operations in 
the global context. It examines the economic, political, cultural, 
legal and technological dimensions of the global environment, 
and the strategic implications of international economy. The 
emphasis in field projects shifts to developing entrepreneurial 
skills. Workshops on entrepreneurship are conducted, and stu- 
dents develop a business plan for a new enterprise from concept 
to strategy formulation, including an international dimension. 

4 credits 



104 



Finance 



Business Academic Programs 



Finance 



Fl 190 Personal Finance 

This course covers applied finance clarifying individual finan- 
cial decision making from a personal standpoint. Investments 
including stocks, bonds, housing purchases, and mutual funds 
are examined with an emphasis on the basic financial prin- 
ciples of risk and return. Life, health, and other insurance 
needs are discussed as are pension and estate planning. (For 
non-majors). 3 credits 

Fl 200 Global Capital Markets 

With the rate of financial innovation and globalization increas- 
ing, financial instruments and institutions are becoming inter- 
national in nature and scope. This course surveys a variety of 
financial instruments, institutions and markets from a global 
perspective. Also covered is the relationship between financial 
intermediaries and central banks. The use of traditional and 
new financial instruments is reviewed in the context of the 
specific markets they serve. (Prerequisite: BU 100.) 3 credits 

Fl 210 Principles of Investments 

This course is an introductory analysis of the determinants of 
valuation for bonds, stocks, and options. The functions of 
efficient capital markets are stressed in developing the return- 
risk tradeoffs that are essential in the valuation process. 
(Prerequisite: BU 200.) 3 credits 

Fl 215 Financial Management 

This course is an analysis of optimal financial decision making. 
Emphasis is placed upon the investment, financing, and divi- 
dend decisions within the existence of efficient capital markets. 
(Prerequisite: BU 100.) 3 credits 

Fl 220 Working Capital Management 

This course is an examination of the management of current 
assets and current liabilities. Emphasis is placed upon cash and 
marketable securities management, cash budgeting, inventory 
control, accounts receivable management, and short-term and 
intermediate-term financing. (Prerequisite: BU 100.) 3 credits 

Fl 240 International Finance 

This course deals with the international aspects of corporate 
finance and investment. Topics covered include foreign ex- 
change with emphasis on exchange rate determination, ex- 
change rate risk and management, international money and 
capital markets, international capital budgeting, cost of capital, 
international trade financing and working capital management. 
(Prerequisite: BU 1 00. or similar coursework with permission of 
instructor.) 3 credits 

Fl 310 Portfolio Analysis 

This course is an examination of individual and institutional 
portfolio management. The overall model of portfolio analysis 
separates decision making into five major areas: portfolio plan- 
ning, investment analysis, portfolio selection, portfolio evalua- 
tion, and portfolio revision. (Prerequisite: Fl 210.) 3 credits 




Fl 315 Futures and Options Markets 

This course examines the use of futures and options by 
financial managers. Both hedging and speculation will be 
covered. The focus of the course is on financial contracts: 
currencies and stock indices, both in the United States and in 
the United Kingdom. (Prerequisite: Fl 210.) 3 credits 

Fl 330 Case Studies in Finance 

This course is an examination and application of the principles 
developed in financial management and investments in a 
domestic and international context. The objective is to inte- 
grate the practice and theory of finance using case studies. 
(Prerequisites: Fl 210, Fl 215 and senior status.) 3 credits 

Fl 391-392 Finance Internship 

Students may take two semesters of internship, approved by 
the department. Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or higher, 
have junior standing, and do the internship in their major area. 

3 or 6 credits 

Fl 397-398 Seminar in Finance 

A special program involving independent study and research. 
Also intended for students accepted in an approved internship. 
(Prerequisite: Open only to seniors with approval by the Area 
Coordinator. Students must have an overall grade point aver- 
age of 2.5 or better.) 3 or 6 credits 



Information Systems 

IS 100 Introduction to Business Computing 

This course surveys the role of computing in the present busi- 
ness environment, including such topics as hardware, software, 
networking and e-commerce. It introduces the student to the use 
of Information Systems concepts and techniques in solving a 
wide range of business problems. As an example of problem 
solving, the student will build a database using a database 
system. 3 credits 



Information Systems 

IS 199 Seminar in Information Systems 

This course is intended for students who took IS 30 and, 
therefore, did not study in any depth certain topics included in IS 
100, such as hardware, software, networking, and information 
concepts. The course includes a brief discussion of systems 
analysis and design. Offered during the 2001-2002 and 2002- 
2003 academic years only. 1 credit 

IS 230 Information Systems and 
Operations Management 

This is the gateway course to the Information Systems & Opera- 
tions Management area. It emphasizes the decision-making 
process, and value creation in strategic and tactical activities. To 
that end, the relationship between information systems and 
planning and control functions is examined in detail. Techniques 
for designing, implementing, operating, controlling and evaluat- 
ing information systems are discussed. In developing a frame- 
work for modeling the decision process, a variety of concepts will 
be covered: defining the problem; developing alternatives and 
value trade-offs; evaluating risk and return of alternatives; decid- 
ing among alternatives; planning for action. The ethical and 
social impacts of information and decision-making systems are 
also discussed. (Prerequisite: IS 100; Corequisite: BU 100.) 

3 credits 

IS 235 Introduction to Business Programming 

This course gives an introduction to computer programming in a 
business environment. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals 
of structured program design, development testing, implemen- 
tation, and documentation of business-oriented applications. 
Discussion and application of programming techniques in a 
variety of high-level programming languages are covered in 
depth for major programming projects. (Prerequisite: IS 100.) 

3 credits 

IS 236 Introduction to COBOL 

In this course students will learn to program in COBOL. The 
application of computers to business problems will be studied. 
File handling and array manipulation will be emphasized. (Pre- 
requisite: IS 100.) 3 credits 

IS 240 Systems Design 

This course is the entry point for the technical electives in the IS 
major. It provides hands-on instruction in contemporary systems 
design methodology and its practical application to business 
systems. After a formal introduction to a design language and 
supporting software tools, students will use the methodology to 
study design patterns in common use in business systems. The 
course concludes with the design and implementation of a 
distributed database application. (Prerequisite: IS 230, an ob- 
ject-oriented programming course; Corequisite: BU 225.) 

3 credits 

IS 241 Systems Design and Fourth 
Generation Languages 

In this course concepts of business system design and design 
procedures are studied. Disk programming and file layout for the 
purposes of system design are covered. Business systems will 
be discussed in depth. Students will design and program one 
commercial system in COBOL. (Prerequisites: IS 100 and 
IS 236.) 3 credits 



Business Academic Programs 



105 



IS 245 Data Communications 

This course familiarizes the students with the basics of commu- 
nications, and then relates those developments to networking. 
The students are introduced to the protocols, hardware and 
software related to networking. (Prerequisite: IS 230. and 
junior standing.) 3 credits 

IS 299 Business Software Topics 

This course introduces the student to software applications not 
addressed in the business core (IS 100) program which focuses 
on MS Office, namely, Word. Excel, and Powerpoint. The course 
is laboratory-oriented and can be taken for different contempo- 
rary topics more than once and be additive toward a 3-credit IS 
elective. The topics may include project management, business 
simulation and expert systems, advanced macro-programming 
with spreadsheet packages, and other applications software for 
the microcomputer or client/server system. 3 credits 

IS 300 Special Topics in Business Computing 

In this course students study opportunities and problems cre- 
ated by the increasing widespread use of computers. They 
examine new developments and/or current practices in com- 
puter and information science. A topic will be selected for 
thorough study; possible subject areas include, but are not 
limited to, data structures, recent hardware or software ad- 
vances, and specialized applications. (Prerequisite: IS 230.) 

3 credits 

IS 310 Systems in Organizations 

This course examines the relationship between organizations 
and technology, particularly in the network enterprise. Students 
examine major management challenges and competitive ad- 
vantage through open, integrated, and extended information 
systems. This course explores the widening scope of informa- 
tion systems in the global environment, and the ability of sys- 
tems to adapt to changes in organizational objectives. Students 
are exposed to a variety of business environments through 
interactive team exercises, case studies and individual research 
projects and presentations. Topics include networks, informa- 
tion ecology, the customization of computer-based services and 
products, security, ethical issues, the changing roles of manag- 
ers, organizational cultures, and the continuous interdepen- 
dence of business change and technical shifts. (Prerequisite: 
IS 230 with a minimum grade of C.) 3 credits 

IS 340 Database Systems 

This course is an in-depth look at designing and building an 
enterprise database system. Students design, develop and build 
a fully operational database application. They explore the de- 
sign and development of these systems, including data model- 
ing, process modeling, and user-interface design. (Prerequi- 
sites: IS 230, IS 240.) 3 credits 



106 



Business Academic Programs 



IS 350 International Information Systems 

This course investigates information technologies in a variety 
of international business environments. The course content 
includes national infrastructures and discrete information cul- 
tures in advanced and developing economies. The social, 
economic, and political impacts of information technologies 
outside the United States will be examined, with an emphasis 
on appropriate systems design and control. Contemporary 
issues such as privacy, security, the protection of intellectual 
property, and national information policies are covered exten- 
sively. (Prerequisites: IS 230, and junior standing.) 3 credits 

IS 360 Decision Support Systems 

This course is an in-depth look at the relationship between 
managerial decision-making and the application of information 
technology to that process. The topics of decision-making 
models, tools, and process are examined by students working 
in teams focused on actual situations in the local, national, and 
international business communities. Current techniques in 
data warehousing, data mining and data visualization are 
explored. (Prerequisites: IS 230, IS 310.) 3 credits 

IS 391-392 Information Systems Internship 

Students may take two semesters of internship, approved by 
the department. Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or higher, 
have junior standing, and do the internship in their major area. 

3 or 6 credits 

IS 395 Systems Project 

This is the capstone course in the major. It brings together all 
of the concepts from previous courses regarding information 
systems. Students are required to analyze a business situa- 
tion, and to design, develop and implement an operational 
information system. (Prerequisites: IS 230, IS 310, cumulative 
quality point average in the major of 2.5, and senior status.) 

3 credits 

IS 397-398 Seminar in Information Systems 

A special program involving independent study and research. 
Also intended for students accepted in an approved internship. 
Prerequisite: Open only to seniors majoring in information 
systems and approved by the Area Coordinator. This course is 
administratively handled by the Office of the Dean and requires 
a formal application by the student to the faculty project advisor 
and the Area Coordinator. The course does not count toward 
fulfilling the requirements for the IS major, but it does count 
toward meeting University credit requirements. Senior status 
required. 3 or 6 credits 

IS 399 Independent Study in Information Systems 

This course of independent study, research, and/or informa- 
tion systems project is a program supervised by one of the full- 
time faculty, for the student who wishes to pursue a specific 
topic of interest. An application form must be completed by the 
student and a faculty project advisor who agree to conduct the 
work according to a mutually agreeable schedule. The Area 
Coordinator and Dean must approve the work. Once the form 
is completed and submitted to the Registrar, the student is 
allowed to register for the course, which is taught during the fall 



Information Systems 

and spring semesters. If any work is to occur at any time other 
than the semester registered, this approval must be obtained 
by the faculty project advisor and the Area Coordinator prior to 
commencement of any work. Normally, the student has com- 
pleted at least two advanced IS courses before taking this 
course. 3 credits 

OM 240 Operations Management Modeling 
and Analysis 

This course explores the quantitative modeling techniques 
used in strategic and tactical operations management issues. 
The emphasis is on problem solving and decision-making 
processes of supply chain management. Topics include trans- 
portation and network models, queuing systems, Markov analy- 
sis, optimization models and forecasting. Computer analysis 
and interpretation will be emphasized. (Prerequisites: IS 230, 
BU 225.) 3 credits 

OM 340 Service Operations 

This course examines service sector industries, such as 
financial services, health care, retailing and education. It fo- 
cuses on the associated operational challenges related to 
high labor intensity, variable demand patterns, high degrees of 
customer contact, and subjectivity-determined quality. (Pre- 
requisites: IS 230, BU 225.) 3 credits 

OM 345 Transportation and Logistics 

The purpose of this course is to introduce logistics manage- 
ment and to identify the relationships between logistics and the 
other functions of the firm, particularly marketing and opera- 
tions management. The course covers both strategic and 
operational issues in logistics and supply chain management. 
Topics include logistics and supply chain design, logistics of 
customer service, transportation management, demand fore- 
casting, inventory management, order processing, warehous- 
ing and materials handling, and facility location. Recent devel- 
opments in logistics, including third party logistics, are exam- 
ined. (Prerequisites: IS 230, BU 100. and junior status.) 

3 credits 

OM 350 Management of Technology and Innovation 

This course enables students to understand and to manage 
innovation, at the operational and strategic levels of an orga- 
nization. It integrates the management of market, technologi- 
cal and organizational changes to provide a framework for 
improving the competitiveness of firms and effectiveness of 
organizations. It emphasizes an effective transition from re- 
search and development to successful products and services. 
The course adopts a competence-based approach to technol- 
ogy management, and focuses not only on internal structure 
and culture, but also on external linkages and processes as 
well. (Prerequisites: IS 230, OM 240, and junior standing.) 

3 credits 



Management 

Management 

MG 225 Operations and Technology Management 
in a Changing Global Environment 

This course examines the on-going discussion about how to 
best produce goods and services for the global market. Current 
issues include the state of trade in high-technology industries, 
the world-wide movement to Just In Time Continuous Improve- 
ment methods throughout the business enterprise. (Prerequi- 
sites: BU 100 and BU 200.) 3 credits 

MG 235 Managing Human Resources for 
Competitive Advantage 

Building on many of the concepts in BU 100 and BU 200, this 
course introduces to students how the effective management 
of people can contribute to firm performance and competitive 
advantage. Toward this end, the course explores Human Re- 
source Management (HRM) activities: human resource plan- 
ning, recruiting, selection, training, performance appraisal, 
compensation, and labor relations. Through extensive use of 
cases, simulations, and exercises, students actively learn how 
to implement various HRM strategies to better serve both or- 
ganizational and employee interests. 3 credits 

MG 240 Leading and Managing People 
for the 21 st Century 

This course will prepare students for the task of leading and 
managing the new organizations in the 21 st century. The course 
will begin with an introduction to virtual reality organizations of 
the future, and present the organizational designs that will 
shape workplaces in the new millennium. The importance of 
teamwork will be emphasized as an outgrowth of these new 
organizational designs. Students will identify five practices of 
leadership that are distinguished from management and ad- 
ministration, and will be assessed on a variety of question- 
naires that illustrate leadership strengths and points for im- 
provement. Class organizational behavior topics, such as del- 
egation, managing conflict, groups and teamwork, power and 
politics, and organizational culture will also be encompassed 
in the course. Students will be expected to participate in a 
daylong team-building program on a Saturday to fulfill course 
requirements. 3 credits 

MG 270 Information Systems in Organizations 

This course establishes a foundation for understanding and 
analyzing information in organizations. Fundamental concepts 
of systems and information are explained. The role of informa- 
tion systems in organizations and the relationship of these 
systems to organizational objectives is developed. Students are 
introduced to the systems point of view, the organization of a 
system, information flows, the nature of information systems, 
elementary skills used in representing systems structure, and 
the types of applications that are part of an information system. 
Topics include: information systems and organizations; repre- 
sentation and analysis of system structure: systems, informa- 
tion, and decision theory. This course is co-listed in the Informa- 
tion Systems program as IS 310. (Prerequisite: IS 100). 

3 credits 



Business Academic Programs 



107 



MG 300 Contemporary Issues in Management 

This course builds on the concepts presented in MG 21 and MG 
31. focusing on the application of managerial principles and 
practices in contemporary problem solving and decision making 
situations. A review of current business publications and the 
case method serve as the principle sources of issues to be 
considered. Topics include organization strategy, effective use 
of resources, the role of corporate image, analysis of organiza- 
tion structure, and responsibility to the organization's various 
publics, among others. (Prerequisites: BU 100 and BU 200.) 

3 credits 

MG 310 Seminar in Production and Operations 
Management — Operating the Firm 

In this course students develop an aggregate production plan for 
a hypothetical firm using basic skills developed in production 
and operations management. Working as teams, they develop 
a business plan and simulate the operation of their firm. The 
effect of tradeoffs in key areas, such as capacity, facility location, 
productivity, quality and materials control are studied. The 
teams compete as if they were in an actual business environ- 
ment by presenting and defending their decision. (Prerequisites: 
BU100andBU200.) 3 credits 

MG 320 Diversity in the Workplace 

This course seeks to develop the framework in which questions 
can be framed, and answers sought, with regard to the challenge 
of diversity in the work environment. In this regard, readings, 
exercises and real-world projects are used to formulate the 
following: a definition of diversity: the promotion of an awareness 
of its impact on businesses and their managers: the identifica- 
tion of not only the challenges that diversity presents but also the 
opportunities it allows for even more productive workplace 
interactions: and the necessary skills, attitudes, and patterns of 
critical thinking needed for effective leadership in this important 
area. Issues presented are done so in the real-life context of 
specific racial, gender and class groups. 3 credits 

MG 330 Career Planning 

This course explores issues relating to career planning and 
development applications in organizations. The career stage 
models of early, mid and late career are examined, and the 
relationships of career development practices to the personnel 
functions in organizations are explored. Career issues relating 
to differences in career paths for men and women, technical 
professionals, and mentoring practices are also examined. 
Opportunities for students to explore their own individual plan- 
ning needs are provided. 3 credits 



108 



Business Academic Programs 



MG 340 and MG 345 Action Learning Module 

This course combines a structured, supervised work experi- 
ence with classes in which this experience is discussed in the 
light of management theory. The resulting innovative learning 
process adds a special intensity to the study of the theoretical 
aspects of management and a grasp of the concrete realities 
of the business world. Each student develops specific and 
individualized goals in cooperation with a work supervisor and 
the faculty member teaching the class. These are integrated 
with learning objectives and in-class work. Students make 
presentations throughout the semester using their work expe- 
riences as living cases. Course readings offer relevant theo- 
ries that students can appraise and modify using the concrete 
situations they encounter in business. 
These courses are taken simultaneously in the student's se- 
nior year. Students must see the coordinator of MG 345 in the 
Fall semester of their junior year to arrange for their MG 345 
structured job experience. 3 credits 

MG 350 Entrepreneurship and 
Small Business Management 

In this course the student is made aware of the problems, 
opportunities, policies, and practices of the small business 
enterprise and its unique role in the free enterprise system. The 
small business firm is examined from conception of the opportu- 
nity to operating the firm, the creative idea, feasibility studies, the 
development of the business and financial plan, launching the 
venture, and managing the firm. Case problems of small busi- 
ness firms are studied. 3 credits 

MG 355 Organizational Culture 

This course forms the framework of the theories and concepts of 
an organization's culture within which students a) identify issues 
affected by organizational culture and learn how they may be 
more effectively managed, b) learn how to analyze, enter, adjust 
to, and become established in a new corporate culture, c) 
explore methods for operating effectively within an organization's 
prevailing culture, and d) examine ways of influencing or chang- 
ing an organization's prevailing culture. (Prerequisite: MG 220.) 

3 credits 

MG 360 International Management 

This course covers the history and evolution of international 
business, the international environment, and the development, 
organization, and structure of the international firm. Also treated 
is the international economy in relation to business policy, 
accounting, finance, and marketing decision making, resource 
transfer and impact on the host country, business-government 
relations, and national and international control of the multina- 
tional corporation. (Students who have taken IL 250 may not 
take MG 360.) (Prerequisites: BU 1 00 and BU 200 or instructor's 
approval.) 3 credits 



Management 

MG 370 Management-Labor Relations 

This course explores questions about the role of labor unions in 
both private and public sector organizations. It covers labor 
history and government regulation of the union-management 
relation as well as the processes of union organizing, negotia- 
tions, and dispute resolution. Special attention will be given to 
the effect of unions on wages, productivity, profitability, and 
organizational competitiveness. 3 credits 

MG 380 Compensation 

This course covers theories and practices for effective com- 
pensation management. Topics included are strategic per- 
spectives of compensation systems, determining pay struc- 
ture, job analysis, job evaluation-design and administration, 
external pay competitiveness, designing pay levels, employee 
contributions and individual pay, subjective performance evalu- 
ation and merit pay, alternative reward systems, employee 
benefits, government's role and compliance, pay discrimina- 
tion, budgets and pay administration, and union role in wages 
and salary administration. 3 credits 

MG 391-392 Management Internship 

Students may take two semesters of internship, approved by the 
department. (Prerequisites: Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or 
higher, have junior standing, and do the internship in their major 
area.) 3 or 6 credits 

MG 397-398 Seminar in Management 

A special program involving independent study and research 
under faculty guidance. Also intended for students accepted in 
an approved internship. (Prerequisites: Open only to seniors 
majoring in management and approved by the Area Coordinator. 
Students must have an overall grade point average of 2.5 or 
above.) 3 or 6 credits 

IS 360 Decision Support and Expert Systems 

(see course description in Information Systems section; cross- 
listed as a Management elective.) 



Marketing 

MK 211 Strategic Marketing Planning 

This course takes the fundamental marketing concepts mas- 
tered in BU 100-200 and applies them to the strategic goals of 
a variety of business models. The student is required to com- 
plete and present a complete marketing plan that demonstrates 
competency in environmental analysis, market segmentation 
and the produce life cycle. In addition, an extensive review of 
marketing channels, pricing, communication and product man- 
agement prepare the student for the in depth treatment of these 
areas in other courses. This course is a prerequisite for all 
marketing courses. 3 credits 



Marketing 

MK212 Consumer Behavior 

This course provides the student with an understanding of the 
behavior of consumers in the marketplace. An interdisciplinary 
approach is used employing concepts from such fields as 
economics, psychology, social psychology, sociology, and psy- 
choanalysis. Among the many topics covered are motivation, 
perception, attitudes, consumer search, and post-transactional 
behavior. 3 credits 

MK 221 Sales and Sales Management 

This course is designed to help students learn sales manage- 
ment principles. Effective management of salespeople is critical 
to business success because many goods and services demand 
personal contacts to close the sale. To function effectively as 
managers, students must know how salespeople perform their 
jobs. In addition, this course emphasizes the role of personal 
selling, account relationships, territory management and new 
technologies in sales management program. 3 credits 

MK 231 Advertising and Promotion 

The goal of this course is to focus on the many changes that are 
occurring in the advertising industry and how they influence 
advertising and promotional strategies and tactics. This course 
is designed from an integrated marketing communications per- 
spective, emphasizing the importance of coordinating the vari- 
ous promotional mix elements with other marketing activities 
that communicate with a company's customers. Topics include 
advertising on traditional media such as TV, radio, and maga- 
zines, and on non-traditional media such as the World Wide 
Web, media planning, direct marketing, public relations, sales 
promotions and personal selling. 3 credits 

MK 241 Internet Marketing 

This course will provide a basic overview of the technologies 
associated with the Internet and the role of this new vehicle as 
a marketing tool. The goal of the course is for students to 
understand the strategies associated with the Internet and both 
its capabilities and limitations. Students will design a web page 
and develop a strategic plan for using the Internet as part of a 
complete marketing program. 3 credits 

MK 311 Marketing Research 

This course gives the student an appreciation of the role market- 
ing research plays in reducing the risks associated with market- 
ing decisions. Emphasis is placed on developing the student's 
basic skills in conducting and evaluating marketing research 
projects. Topics include problem formulation, research design, 
data collection instruments, sampling and field operations, data 
analysis, and presentation of results. 3 credits 

MK312 International Marketing 

This course emphasizes the role of marketing and marketing 
management in different environments having an impact on the 
various marketing functions. In addition to a focus on marketing 
activities and their management which are experienced in the 
domestic environment, special emphasis is given to cultural, 
political, geographic, and other factors in different environ- 
ments. The focus is on international marketing by firms in other 
nations as well as American firms. 3 credits 



Business Academic Programs 



109 



MK 321 Distribution Management 

This course is designed to provide a management focus and 
managerial framework to the discipline of distribution and chan- 
nel management. The emphasis is on the design and manage- 
ment of marketing channels as a key strategic tool in satisfying 
the needs of the customers in the new millennium. Theory and 
practice are integrated in their application to the decision- 
making processes. In addition, the importance of the Internet as 
a marketing channel for the distribution of goods and services is 
discussed. 3 credits 

MK 322 Business to Business Marketing 

This course examines the characteristics that differentiate in- 
dustrial from consumer marketing: nature of industrial demand, 
buyer characteristics, industrial market research, competitive 
bidding and selling of industrial products, sales and advertising 
strategies in marketing to business, government, and non-profit 
organizations. Practices and policies in the distribution of indus- 
trial goods. 3 credits 

MK331 Media Strategy 

This course examines the basic processes involved in strategic 
media planning including budgeting, selecting media forms and 
media vehicles, media timing, and media audience measure- 
ment. Students should understand the role of both traditional 
and non-traditional media as well as new media such as the 
Internet as channels for communicating promotional messages 
to consumers. Varied media allocation models will be covered as 
well. 3 credits 

MK 332 Public Relations 

This course is designed to facilitate the fundamental under- 
standing of audiences: receiving information from them, advis- 
ing management of their attitudes and responses, helping to set 
policies that demonstrate responsible attention to them, and 
constantly evaluating the effectiveness of all public relations 
programs. This inclusive role integrates all activities associated 
with ascertaining and influencing the opinions of a group of 
people. Increased attention is paid to the use of electronic 
technology for messages: from fax machines, e-mail, to special- 
ized networks in cyberspace. 3 credits 

MK 341 Product Management 

This course focuses on one element in the marketing mix — the 
product. It examines such questions as how should a firm 
effectively and efficiently manage its current product line and 
develop potential new products. Consideration is also given to 
strategic planning. 3 credits 

MK 342 Contemporary Issues in Marketing 

This course presents a seminar on current marketing issues. Its 
intent is to familiarize the student with the latest issues, events, 
and problems in marketing. The subject matter for the course 
draws upon recent events in marketing and course materials are 
derived from current periodicals and cases. 3 credits 



110 



Business Academic Programs 



NURSING 



Major & Course Descriptions 



I £l Nursing Academic Programs 

School of Nursing 



Dean: Jeanne Marie Lemire Novotny, Ph.D. 



Program for 
Registered Nurses 

The program for registered nurse students does not differ 
from that of the full-time students in required courses and 
credits. The overall objectives of the program and the 
specific objectives for each course remain the same for 
both the full-time and the registered nurse candidates, 
hence ensuring consistency in the academic standards 
and quality of the program. The methods by which the 
course objectives are met by registered nurse students 
reflect teaching/learning strategies appropriate for adult 
learners. Registered nurses enroll in two seminar courses 
to facilitate entry into the program. These courses provide 
new theoretical learning, provide a forum for discussion of 
relevant nursing issues, and guide students in articulating 
their personal and professional goals. 

Admission 

Registered nurse students are admitted through the School 
of Continuing Education and must complete a minimum of 
12 credits with a grade of "C" or better in order to 
matriculate. Course requirements in the liberal arts and 
required supportive courses can be met by CLEP and 
Regents examinations, transfer credits from other aca- 
demic institutions, or enrollment in specific courses. 
Courses are accepted in transfer from other accredited 
colleges and universities on the basis of a satisfactory 
("C" or better) academic record and course equivalency. 
A minimum of 60 credits, including the last 30 credits for 
the degree, must be taken at Fairfield University. 

Advanced Placement in Nursing 
Registered nurse students may earn advanced place- 
ment in the nursing major for a maximum of 30 credits. 
Advanced placement is awarded upon successful comple- 
tion of Excelsior tests, NLN exams, portfolio assessment, 
or the articulation agreement among nursing programs in 
Connecticut. 

Registration 

Registered nurse students register through the School 
of Continuing Education. Call (203) 254-4150 or (203) 
254-4220 for procedures, class schedules, and dates 
for the fall, spring, and summer semesters. 



General Information 
Second Degree Program 

The School offers the nursing curriculum in an acceler- 
ated form for persons holding a baccalaureate degree in 
another field and who now wish to enter nursing. Upon 
completion of prerequisite courses, students matricu- 
late and complete degree requirements in approxi- 
mately 18 months. A minimum of 60 credits, including 
the last 30 credits for the degree, must be taken at 
Fairfield University. Information is available from the 
School of Nursing. 



Bachelor of Professional Studies 

Fast track for RN's to MSN Program 

Registered Nurses who do not wish to complete the BSN 
before entering the MSN program may opt for the BPS 
fast track. This track offers nursing courses that are 
prerequisites for the MSN. 



Graduate Programs 

The School of Nursing MSN Practitioner track is a 42- 
credit program of study preparing nurse-practitioners in 
family practice and psychiatric-mental health practice. 
Upon completion, graduates are eligible to take profes- 
sional certification examinations and be licensed as 
APRNs. The graduate program also is accredited by the 
National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. 

The newly developed Masters of Science in Nursing 
Healthcare Systems track is intended to provide an 
opportunity for non-clinical graduate education for nurs- 
ing professionals. This program of studies is in collabo- 
ration with the Charles F. Dolan School of Business. It 
prepares the professional nurse to manage organized 
healthcare services (Healthcare Management concen- 
tration) or develop and implement of strategies to re- 
duce liability and improve compliance and quality out- 
comes in healthcare (Healthcare Law concentration). 



General Information 

Nursing Curriculum 

The three components of the School of Nursing's under- 
graduate program are: 

The core curriculum — Nursing students must complete 
the core curriculum that is required of all Fairfield under- 
graduates, with the exception that nursing students 
meet either the fine arts or the language requirement. 

Natural and social sciences — Students take one 
semester of chemistry and three semesters of biology 
which includes anatomy, physiology, and microbiology. 
Because the social sciences form an important part of 
the foundation for nursing practice, students also take 
courses in psychology and sociology. 

Nursing courses — Classroom instruction in nursing 
theory and skills begins in the freshman year and con- 
tinues throughout the undergraduate program. Nursing 
courses are comprised of both theoretical and clinical 
components. With each passing year clinical work in- 
creases, until, by the senior year, a significant portion of 
time is spent in the nursing major, which includes clinical 
practice as well as the theory component. To ensure that 
students obtain the breadth and depth of clinical expe- 
rience needed, the School has associations with many 
clinical facilities, including private hospitals, veterans 
hospitals, clinics, outpatient departments, rehabilitation 
centers, public health departments, long-term care fa- 
cilities, home care agencies, community health centers, 
schools, and its own Health Promotion Center in Bridge- 
port. 

Note: Clinical courses are available daytime only. 



Nursing Academic Programs 



113 




The nursing courses in the sophomore, junior, and 
senior years are sequential and are prerequisites to 
other courses. Because of the special nature of the 
nursing curriculum, Human Anatomy and Physiology (Bl 
1 07-1 08), Microbiology (Bl 1 51 ) and each nursing course 
must be completed successfully (minimum grade of "C ") 
in order for students to progress in the course sequence 
for the nursing major. Students must also meet the 
promotion policy requirements of the University in order 
to progress in the program. Nursing majors must be 
certified in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by the 
spring term of the sophomore year and remain certified 
throughout the nursing program. All health require- 
ments and OSHA training requirements must be met 
each year prior to clinical practica. 



For the latest course information 

visit our website 
www.fairfield.edu/sce/index.htm 

Go to Class Hour Schedules 
to search for course offerings. 



114 



Nursing Academic Programs 



Curriculum Guide (for students matriculated by Spring 2001) 

Nursing - Part-time or Second Degree 



HUMANITIES 

(12 courses) 

English 11 

English 12 

Ethics (AE 285) 

History 30 

History 

2 Language* OR 

2 Visual & Performing Arts' 

Philosophy 

Religious Studies 

Humanities Electives: 

1. 

2 

3 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 

(4 courses) 

Developmental Psychology 
Abnormal Psychology 
Social Science 
Social Science 



MATH & SCIENCE 

(5 courses) 

Anatomy & Physiology I 

Anatomy & Physiology II 

Microbiology 

General Chemistry w/Lab 

Statistics (Math 17)*** 



Fairfield 
University 



□ 

n 



Transfer 



□ 
D 
D 
D 
3 





Semester 


Gi 


NURSING 




(55 credits) 




NS270 


Health Assessment 3 


□ 


NS271 


HealthCareDel.Sys □ 





NS272 


Research Nursing 3 





NS273 


Intro. Pro. Nursing G 


a 


NS274 


Profess. Nursing: 






Ldrship & Mngmt D 


a 


NS275 


Patterns Wellness □ 


n 


NS276 


Patterns Illness I D 


3 


NS277 


BasConcPathPhar D 


D 


NS278 


Nursing of Children 






and Family 





NS279 


Mental Health Nurs. □ 


3 


NS281 


Ther. Nurs. Interv. 3 


□ 


NS371 


Patterns Illness II D 


□ 


NS372 


Com. Health & Eld. □ 


□ 


NS373 


Nursing of Women & 






Childbearing Family □ 


□ 


NS374 


Transition: Pro. 






Nursing Practice 


□ 



GENERAL ELECTIVES 

(3 courses) 

1 

2 

3. 



Fairfield 



Language - 2 courses, 
Intermediate or above 
Visual & Performing 
Arts - Only 1 studio 
One math course 
required 



Transfer 

□ 

a 



REQUIRED: 

1 US Diversity course 
1 World Diversity course 
60 credits at Fairfield 
Last 30 credits at Fairfield 



Nursing Academic Programs 



115 



Curriculum Guide 

RN / BSN Program 



123-128 Total Credits 



Fairfield 
University 



HUMANITIES 

(12 courses) 

English 11 3 

English 12 □ 

Ethics (AE 285) □ 

History 30 lJ 

History □ 

2 Language* OR D 

2 Visual & Performing Arts** 3 

Philosophy 3 

Religious Studies 3 

Humanities Electives: 

1. □ 

2. □ 

3. 3 



Transfer 



□ 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 





Fairfield 






University 


Tr 


MATH & SCIENCE 






(5 courses) 






Anatomy & Physiology I 


□ 


□ 


Anatomy & Physiology II 


□ 


□ 


Microbiology 


3 


□ 


General Chemistry w/Lab 


3 


□ 


Statistics (MA 17)*** 


3 


□ 


NURSING 






(7 courses/23 credits) 






NS 250 Profess. Nursing 


3 


3 


NS 252 Health Assessment 3 


3 


NS272 Research 


3 


3 


NS 274 Leadership Mngt. 


3 


3 


NS 372** Community 


3 


3 


NS 376 Transition 


3 


3 


NS Elective 


3 


3 



Transfer 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 

(4 courses) 

Developmental Psychology 3 

Abnormal Psychology 3 

Social Science 3 

Social Science □ 



* Language must be intermediate or above 
** Prerequisite: Completion of Portfolio 

Assessment and NLN's, NS 250 and NS 252 
'** One math course required 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

By Articulation (30 credits) 3 
*By NLN Exam/Portfolio 
Assessment (28 credits) 3 

GENERAL ELECTIVES 

(2 courses) 

1. □ 

2 3 



REQUIRED: 1 US Diversity course 

1 World Diversity course 
60 credits at Fairfield 
Last 30 credits at Fairfield 



I O Nursing Academic Programs 
Curriculum Guide 

Nursing - BPS Fast Track to MSN 



120-124 Total Credits 





Fairfield 




HUMANITIES 


University 


Tr 


(12 courses) 






English 11 


3 


3 


English 12 


D 


3 


History 30 


3 


3 


History 


3 


3 


Philosophy 


3 


3 


PH/RS/AE 


3 


3 


Religious Studies 


3 


3 


Visual & Perform. Arts Lee. 


3 


3 


Visual & Perform. Arts 


3 


3 


Humanities Electives: 






1. 


3 
3 
3 


3 


? 


3 


3 


3 


SOCIAL SCIENCE 




(4 courses) 






Economics 


3 


3 


Politics 


3 


3 


Psychology 


3 


3 


Sociology 


3 


3 


MATH & SCIENCE 






(4 courses) 






Math 17* (Stats) 


3 


3 


Math 


3 


3 


Biology 


3 


3 


Chemistry 


3 


3 


Physics 


3 


3 



Transfer 



REQUIRED 


Fairfield 
University 


Transfer 


GS399 


□ 


3 


** 10 Upper Division 


courses 




GENERAL AREA 1 
Discipline: 

NS502 


3 


3 


NS252 


3 


3 


NS372 


3 


3 


NS458 


3 


3 


GENERAL AREA II 
Discipline: 

1. 


3 


3 


? 


n 


3 


3 


n 


3 


4. 


3 


3 



GENERAL AREA III OR OTHER DISCIPLINES 
1. 3 3 

2 □ □ 



GENERAL ELECTIVES 

1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5 

6 

7. 

8. 

9. 



'Another math may be used, but you will need statistics for the Master's program. 

"Within the upper division course work a minimum of two general areas must be represented; nursing is one. General Areas include Humanities. Social 

Science. Math and Science. Business, or Professional (Nursing). A minimum of four disciplines must be represented, and no more than four courses 

may be taken within each discipline. Disciplines include courses such as English. Sociology, Biology, or Accounting. 

A maximum of 75 credits may be transferred into the degree including portfolio credits and credits by examination (CLEP or Regents). 

Students will earn a BS in Professional Studies before enrolling in the MSN Program. 



Course Descriptions 

Course Descriptions 

Courses described below are nursing courses only. As 
stated previously, all nursing students are required to 
take the core curriculum and designated support 
courses. Descriptions of core curriculum courses - as 
well as descriptions of other science and social sci- 
ence courses required of nursing students - may be 
found in the College of Arts and Sciences section of 
this catalog. 

NS 270 Health Assessment 

This course introduces the student to the knowledge and 
skills of health assessment of clients throughout the life span, 
with consideration of cultural and ethnic variations. Critical 
thinking and communication are essential components of 
health assessment. Lecture, discussion, demonstration, 
supervised and individual practice, and opportunities to 
develop self-evaluation skills through analysis of video 
recordings of performance are used to help students develop 
skills in interviewing, taking a health history, and completing 
a physical examination. Students organize and prioritize 
data using Functional Health Patterns, and record assessment 
data on designated forms. 

In addition, this course provides a separate one-credit 
laboratory module designed to complement the Physical 
Assessment skills. Students will use the SON Learning 
Resource Center to develop skills pertaining to infection 
control, body mechanics and client hygiene. (Prerequisites: 
Bl 107, CH, NS273) 
(2 Theory, 1 Lab, 1 Module) 4 credits 

NS 271 Health Care Delivery Systems 

The health care delivery system in the United States is 
explored through issues related to conceptual, historical, 
economic, political, and technological developments. 
Emphasis is given to ethical and legal aspects of our current 
system that remain unresolved, such as access to care, type 
of services to provide, and roles within the system. Consumer 
use of traditional, alternative, and experimental therapies will 
be discussed. This course is designed to give an 
interdisciplinary perspective to students interested in health 
care from any field of study. The course will include a 
required 5 hours of service learning volunteer involvement in 
a health-related organization. 
(Theory) 3 credits 

NS 272 Research in Nursing 

This course provides an introduction to the research process 
and its application to scholarship in clinical practice. Students 
learn to be consumers of research through a review of the 
literature, critique of research, and identification of methods 
appropriate to study specific practice-related problems. An 
emphasis is placed on critical thinking and writing skills. 
Consideration is given to ethical, economic, technological, 
and statistical dimensions. Application is made to clinical 
research, evidence-based practice, and quality improvement. 
(Prerequisite: MA 17) 
(Theory) 3 credits 



Nursing Academic Programs 



117 



NS 273 Introduction to Professional Nursing 

This course serves as a foundation to the development of the 
nurse as a professional person. Central to this is the awareness 
and acceptance of self. The process of critical thinking/ 
judgment as an approach to the planning and delivery of 
nursing care to individuals, families, groups and communities 
is introduced. Discussion of nursing's history and 
accomplishments will serve as the cornerstone for the 
advancement of professional behaviors including scholarship, 
communication, collaboration, personal responsibility/ 
accountability, integration of research and practice, and peer 
and self-evaluation. 
(Theory) 3 credits 

NS 274 Professional Nursing: 
Leadership and Management 

This course immerses students in issues and concepts 
central to professional nursing. It examines political, social 
and legal systems that affect the image of nursing and 
influence its role definition. Organizational dynamics and 
theories of leadership and management are considered, with 
case studies and concurrent clinical practica providing the 
foundation for theory integration. Critical reflection and 
creative planning are facilitated through experiential projects 
that involve acute care and community-based practice 
settings. (Prerequisites NS 271, NS 273) 
(Theory) 3 credits 

NS 275 Patterns of Wellness 

This course explores factors that influence the degree of 
health and wellness experienced by individuals across the 
life span. Epidemiology provides a framework for the 
assessment of risk and the management of common health 
problems. Students have opportunities to promote wellness 
through clinical experiences with healthy children and adults. 
How people make health related decisions, what risks threaten 
their health, and what reasons they give for adopting particular 
lifestyles is examined. Spirituality and culture are addressed 
as well with particular attention devoted to assessment 
techniques and intervention strategies. Students learn both 
traditional and (alternative) complementary therapeutic 
techniques to enhance health. (Prerequisites: NS 270. 
NS271.NS273. PY163) 
(3 Theory, 1 Clinical) 4 credits 

NS 276 Patterns of Illness I 

This course introduces the student to illnesses that are most 
frequently occurring in the U.S. adult population. Included in 
the discussion of these illnesses are components of the 
nursing process: assessment, diagnoses, interventions and 
expected outcomes. Specific therapeutic interventions, both 
independent and collaborative will be discussed, including 
indications for their use and evaluation of their effectiveness. 
Use of case examples will be a frequent teaching strategy. 
Competence in the performance of selected skills will also be 
achieved during this course. Included in the course is clinical 
practicum with an acutely ill adult population. (Prerequisites: 
Bl 107. Bl 108, Bl 151 . CH, NS 270. NS 275. NS 277. NS 279. 
NS281) 
(3 Theory, 2 Clinical) 5 credits 



118 



Nursing Academic Programs 



NS 277 Basic Concepts of Pathophysiology 
& Pharmacology 

This course is a study of physiological life processes of 
persons. Normal physiology with a focus on deviations from 
normal will be discussed with a particular emphasis on 
exemplar cases. The stress response is examined as well as 
the interaction of stress on inflammatory, healing, immune, 
and regulatory functioning. Pharmacological and nutritional 
kinetics and dynamics are discussed as therapeutic strategies 
fortreating alterations in normal life processes. (Prerequisites: 
Bl 107, Bl 108. Bl 151. CH) 
(Theory) 3 credits 

NS 278 Nursing of Children and Family 

This course focuses on the nursing care of children, 
adolescents, and families dealing with health and 
developmental challenges of childhood. In addition, health 
promotion needs of childrearing families are explored. Clinical 
resources reflect the trend towards community-based care, 
with student experiences in community agencies (schools, 
rehabilitation sites, and day care settings), as well as in acute 
care settings. The course employs a developmental 
perspective through which major causes of morbidity and 
mortality are examined. Health problems are introduced via 
case studies that serve as vehicles for the integration of 
multicultural and multi-disciplinary perspectives. Students 
are challenged to develop both critical and creative reasoning 
skills in working through the cases, and are guided in the use 
of developmentally and empathically appropriate 
communication strategies. (Prerequisites: NS 270. NS 275. 
NS277. NS279. NS281) 
(2 Theory. 2 Clinical) 4 credits 

NS 279 Mental Health Nursing 

The focus of this course is nursing care of clients form diverse 
backgrounds with mental illness. Holistic care is provided 
through various psychotherapeutic approaches using the 
nursing process. Emphasis is on critical decision making with 
clinical practica providing the student with the opportunity to 
develop therapeutic communication skills and therapeutic 
use of self. Cultural, ethical and legal issues that have the 
potential to impact the care clients and their families receive 
are also addressed. (Prerequisites: PY 1 63, NS 270, NS 273) 
(3 Theory. 1 Clinical) 4 credits 

NS 281 Therapeutic Nursing Interventions 

This course focuses on the provision of safe and effective 
care related to the basic needs of clients of all ages using 
common nursing technical skills with consideration of cultural 
and ethnic variations. Psychomotor skills are introduced that 
address various nursing interventions, which help the client 
to maintain physical well-being. Such interventions include: 
wound care: administration of oral, parenteral and intravenous 
medications: glucose monitoring: and measures to assist 
with urinary and bowel elimination, as well as nasogastric 
and respiratory care. The School of Nursing Learning 
Resource Centerprovides opportunities to use critical thinking 
in skill practice, interactive learning, supervised return 
demonstration, and hypothetical clinical situations. 
(Prerequisite: NS 270) 
(1 Theory, 2 Lab) 3 credits 



Course Descriptions 

NS 371 Patterns of Illness II 

This course integrates knowledge learned in Patterns of 
Illness I and introduces the student to other patterns of 
illness. Discussion involves the components of the nursing 
process: assessment, diagnoses, interventions, and expected 
outcomes of patients throughout the adult lifespan. Specific 
therapeutic interventions, both independent and collaborative 
are discussed including indications fortheir use and evaluation 
of their effectiveness. Using case studies is a frequent 
teaching strategy. Included in the course is clinical practicum 
working with high acuity patients across the adult lifespan. 
(Prerequisites: NS 276, NS 278) 
(Theory; 1.9 Clinical; .1 College Lab (CAPD) 3 credits 

NS 372 Community Health and the Elderly 

The focus of this course is on the provision of safe and 
effective care to older adults and their families living in 
community and group settings. Special attention is given to 
1 ) the process of aging and health problems associated with 
older adults, and 2) the promotion of health and the prevention 
of disability in older adults. This course synthesizes learning, 
with specific application to various population groups of older 
adults. Through the use of a group community assessment 
project, community characteristics are identified and analyzed 
with respect to planning strategies for intervention and 
evaluation to meet the special needs of people over 65 years 
of age. It is expected that students will complete a detailed 
physical assessment and assessment of client needs as part 
of a series of home visits. Group discussion of case studies, 
plus presentations by providers of community services for 
the elderly, assist students in developing an appreciation for 
the complex care needs of this at-risk population. 
(Prerequisites: NS 275, NS 278, NS 371. NS 373) 
(2 Theory, 2 Clinical) 4 credits 

NS373 Nursing of Women and the 
Childbearing Family 

This course is designed to provide students with the 
opportunity to master the knowledge and skills necessary to 
assist the family to cope with changes in their reproductive 
needs, reproductive health issues, and gynecological 
challenges. Reproductive needs include the childbearing 
cycle: pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum, care of the healthy 
newborn and prenatal, intrapartal and post-partal 
complications. Reproductive health issues covered in this 
class include: infertility, family planning, menarche and 
menopause. Gynecological challenges on which we focus 
are breast and reproductive tract surgery. Ethical and legal 
aspects of reproductive issues will be integrated throughout 
the course. Nursing theories and research findings related to 
reproductive health will be discussed more generally regarding 
theory. (Prerequisites: NS 276. NS 278) 
(3 Theory; 1 Clinical) 4 credits 



Course Descriptions 

NS374 Transition: Professional Nursing Practice 

This capstone course addresses health promotion, 
maintenance and restoration with clients in a variety of health 
care settings. Students are placed in selected health care 
settings in which they can practice under the supervision of 
a staff nurse preceptor. The focus is on moving students 
toward autonomous professional nursing practice within their 
clinical setting. Functional health patterns provide the 
framework for giving care. Nursing theories are explored for 
their relevance and utility to nursing practice. Students have 
an opportunity to apply leadership principles in coordinating 
care for groups of clients. Decision-making, collaboration, 
autonomy and outcome evaluation are emphasized. Weekly 
conferences are held to discuss professional, clinical and 
health policy issues. (Prerequisites: NS 371, NS 373) 
(126 clinical) 3 credits 

NS 398 NCLEX: State Board Review 

This course is designed to assist students in preparing for the 
NCLEX Licensing Examination. Content focuses on refining 
problem solving and critical thinking skills as well as test 
taking strategies. Nursing theory is reinforced throughout. 
This course is mandatory for all nursing students who will 
take the licensing exam. (Prerequisites: NS 343, NS 345) 
(14 hours) credits 

NS 399 Nursing Independent Study 

Through individually designed projects or activities, students 
work with a faculty member to study a specific area in depth. 
(Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor and Dean) 

1-6 credits 

NS 458 Bridge to Advanced Practice 

This course serves as a foundation for advanced clinical 
practice. It is designed to facilitate the transition to advanced 
professional practice. As such, theories that focus on nursing 
research and principles of leadership and management are 
discussed. Individual leadership projects are vehicles for 
integration of knowledge as preparation for graduate 
scholarship. Professional practice issues in the contemporary 
health care arena are also addressed. 
(42 theory) 3 credits 



119 



Nursing Academic Programs 

Courses Specifically for 
Registered Nurse Students 



NS 250 Professional Nursing 

This course is designed to orient the registered nurse to 
baccalaureate nursing education and to facilitate entry into a 
new educational system. The scope and aims of professional 
nursing practice are articulated in the study of concepts and 
issues of multiple aspects of health care delivery and educa- 
tion. The School of Nursing philosophy and conceptual 
framework are examined. (Prerequisite: Licensure as an 
R.N.) 
(56 theory hours) 4 credits 

NS 252 Health and Family Assessment 

This course introduces the registered nurse student to the 
knowledge and skills of health assessment of clients across 
the lifespan. Through a variety of methodologies in the 
classroom and opportunities to practice the skills in the 
college laboratory, students apply interviewing techniques to 
elicit a comprehensive health history and perform a physical 
examination in evaluating health status. Family theory and 
therapeutic use of self are incorporated. (Prerequisites: 
Bl 107, Bl 108. NS 250.) 
(28 theory & 28 lab hours) 3 credits 

NS 376 Transition Seminar: 
Professional Nursing Practice 

This course challenges RN students to facilitate change in a 
clinical setting for the purpose of positively influencing pa- 
tient care in health promotion, health maintenance, and/or 
health restoration. Through clinical experiences and the 
implementation of an individually-designed project, students 
further develop their critical thinking and communication 
skills, demonstrate the application of research, leadership, 
management, education and therapeutic nursing principles, 
and are helped to make the transition to a more autonomous, 
professional level of practice. (Prerequisites: NS 272. 
NS 274 and NS 372.) 
(21 seminar & 63 clinical hours) 3 credits 



120 



Nursing Academic Programs 



Course Descriptions 



STUDY ABROAD 



\ d-C- Study Abroad Academic Programs 

Fairfield University 
Office of Study Abroad 

Administered by 

the School of Continuing Education 



An international experience has become an invaluable 
part of a complete undergraduate education. Fairfield 
provides numerous opportunities for study abroad and 
assistance in navigating a sometimes confusing array 
of choices. Your options are many, and more students 
than ever are studying in Asia, South America, Eastern 
Europe and Africa in addition to the more traditional 
destinations in Western Europe. We encourage you to 
consider the many alternatives. Spend a semester, a 
year, a month, or just ten days abroad, earning 
academic credit and the kind of knowledge of the world 
that only on-site experience can provide. 



General Information 




PROGRAMS: 

There are three types of study-abroad experiences 
from which to choose: 



Policies 

ELIGIBILITY: To be eligible for semester study abroad 
you must have an overall GPA of 2.80 or better at the 
time of application. This requirement does not usually 
apply to short term and summer programs. Be aware 
that individual programs have their own criteria and 
may require higher GPAs. Exceptions to stated GPA 
policy may be made upon appeal to the Study Abroad 
Advisory Committee. 



FINANCIAL AID: As a general rule, federal and state 
financial aid can be used toward study abroad 
programs. Institutional aid, scholarships and monthly 
payment plan eligibility through AMS will be applied 
only to Fairfield and affiliated programs. Neitherathletic 
scholarships nor work-study monies may be applied to 
study aboard programs. Tuition Grant-ln-Aid will apply 
only to those children of Fairfield University employees 
who are matriculated at Fairfield University and who 
participate in the following semester programs that 
earn Fairfield grades: Florence and Harlaxton. Grants 
— in-aid for these programs are in the amount of tuition 
charged by the foreign host institution. 



Fairfield Programs 

Fairfield programs earn Fairfield University credit; all 
coursework is taught in English, and is reflected on 
your transcript and computed into your grade point 
average. Students pay current Fairfield University 
tuition, room and board fees. Financial aid for which 
students are eligible remains in place. 



Semester Programs 

Florence Campus 
(one or two semesters) 

Students study at the Lorenzo de' Medici Institute and 
live in shared apartments in the historic city center. A 
wide variety of courses, taught by an excellent 
international faculty are available in disciplines ranging 
from International business to history of architecture. 
Italian language (each students must take at least 
three credits), studio art, social sciences, history, and 
literature are strongly represented. 

Harlaxton Program, England 
(Fall semester only) 

This program for nursing majors provides the 
coursework needed for on-time graduation as well as 
a course in British culture. Upon return to the U.S. 
students take NS 218 during the summer session. 
Harlaxton College is located in Grantham, England, 
about an hour north of London. 



General Information 



Short Term Programs 



Study Abroad Academic Programs 



123 



Affiliated Programs 



Note: Summer and intersession programs are offered 
in rotation. Every program may not be offered every 
year and new programs may be added to the rotation. 

Summer Campus in Florence 
(offered every summer) 

Two four-week sessions are offered at the Lorenzo de' 
Medici Institute in June and July. Six credits may be 
earned during each session. 

Intersession in St. Petersburg, Russia 
(January) 

Herzen University hosts our St. Petersburg program 
that is taught by both Fairfield and Herzen faculty. Six 
credits are available in Russian language, literature, 
history and culture. All coursework is taught in English 
except, of course, language courses. 

Three Great Religions in Modern Jerusalem 
(January) 

Study Judaism, Christianity, and Islam as they now co- 
exit in the complex society that is today's Jerusalem. 

An Irish Experience in Galway 
(Summer, two weeks) 

Two. two-week sessions based at the National 
University of Ireland, Galway, where students take a 3 
credit course in Irish Literature and are introduced to 
Irish history, politics, culture and more. 

Summer in Munich and Berlin 

Students earn six credits in two courses: HI 210, The 
Third Reich, and GM 287, Modern German Literature 
in Translation. Courses (taught in English) are 
enriched with site visits. 



A French Experience in Paris and Angers 
(Summer) 

This course is the ultimate component of a program 
designed to provide 12 credits of French language in 
one academic year. Especially designed for students 
who wish to complete in one year the equivalent of 
Intermediate (FR 101-102) and Continuing (FR 121- 
122). Other students of French may enroll with 
permission of instructor. Students earn 3 credits during 
their stay in France. 



Coursework completed in these programs earns 
transfer credit. You may use courses taken to satisfy 
major, minor, core or elective requirements. Your 
credits do not appear on your transcript and are not 
computed into your grade point average. Current 
Fairfield University fees fortuition, room and broad will 
apply and financial aid for which the student is eligible 
will continue. 



Some of the programs in this category, such as ISEP. 
Doshisha, Sophia, Maastricht and Baden- 
Wuerttemberg are exchange programs. Placement is 
dependent upon availability. 



ISEP -The International Student 

Exchange Program Sites worldwide 

CIEE - Council Study Centers Sites worldwide 

AustraLeam Australia, many sites 

Institute for 

American Universities Aix-en-Provence. France 

Regent's College London. England 

National University of 

Ireland, Galway Galway. Ireland 

Doshisha Women's College Kyoto. Japan 

Sophia University Tokyo. Japan 

Baden-Wuerttemberg 

Exchange Germany. 9 Universities 

Herzen University St. Petersburg. Russia 

Maastricht University .... Maastricht, the Netherlands 

Beijing Center for 

Language & Culture Beijing. China 



MORE INFORMATION ON ALL PROGRAMS is 

available in the Office of Study Abroad located in 
the School of Continuing Education, Dolan House. 
Fairfield University. 



124 



Study Abroad Academic Programs 



PROFESSIONAL & PERSONAL 
DEVELOPMENT 



126 



Professional and Personal Development 



Admission 

Certificate courses may be taken individually without 
enrolling in a complete program. They are designed for 
two purposes: for those seeking the basic knowledge 
and skills required for an entry-level position in a special 
field; or for those who are currently employed and are 
seeking additional knowledge to enhance their careers. 
The description of each certificate program indicates the 
audience for whom it is intended. There are no 
prerequisites for admission to the certificate programs. 
Certain certificate courses however, carry an academic 
credit option and may be used toward fulfilling degree 
requirements. No transfer courses from otherinstitutions 
will be accepted into certificate programs. All certificate 
requirements must be completed at Fairfield University. 

Courses required for the various certificates are offered 
according to the schedules published by the School of 
Continuing Education. Both required and elective courses 
are scheduled as frequently as possible to permit students 
maximum access. To promote convenient completion 
schedules, courses are offered on a rotating basis. 
NOTE: Refer to the semester schedule catalog for 
courses offered in the current semester. 

To receive a Certificate of Completion upon fulfillment 
of program requirements, students must complete 
a program review form and pay a fee of S25.00. 
Counseling services are available for all certificate 
students. To make an appointment, call (203) 254-4220 
or (888) 254-1566. 



Grades & Standing 

Certificate courses are graded in the traditional manner 
(see Undergraduate section). Only grades of "C" and 
above will be credited towards fulfilling certificate 
requirements. Certain courses in the Professional 
Development Program are graded on a satisfactory 
completion basis using the letter grade of "S." 

Students taking these courses under an employer's 
sponsorship should check the employer's grading 
requirements. There is no time limit for completing a 
Certificate Program. However, students are encouraged 
to take at least one course per term. 



Credit Options 

Students working towards an undergraduate degree 
may take courses for academic credit only in the following 
certificate programs: Communications. Computer 
Graphics. Interior Design and Writing. Students should 
consult an adviser before enrolling for credit in a particular 
program. Please call (203) 254-4220 or (888) 254-1 566. 



Business Certificate Programs 

Call The Leadership Center 

for a complete certificate brochure, (203) 254-4170. 



BB 109 Overview of Human Resources 

This is a two-semester program designed for those who wish 
to broaden their perspective of the human resource profession. 
To those already in the field it gives a comprehensive upgrade: 
to those new in the field it presents essential knowledge for 
entry into exempt positions. The two-semester format provides 
an overview of various aspects of the Human Resource function. 
Developed in cooperation with the National Human Resources 
Association. Includes instructional modules covering the 
functions, the management principles applicable to the field 
and professional development: Overview of the Field, 
Employment/Recruitment. Equal Employment Opportunity and 
Affirmative Action. Compensation/Job Evaluation Benefits, 
Training and Development, Organizational Development. 
Management Principles. Professional Development. 
Outplacement and Labor Relations. 

LC 20 Professional Leadership Certificate 
Program - Fairfield University Campus\ 

This semester-long program for business professionals explores 
the characteristics and skills that define leadership in business 
today. Leadership is measured by the results it achieves. 
Becoming an effective leader requires mastering a broad 
range of competencies as well as developing and utilizing 
people related skills. By bringing together experienced 
management faculty and selected executives representing a 
diversity of experiences and knowledge, this program generates 
the atmosphere for new leadership perspectives and the 
exchange of ideas. The format encompasses interactive lectures 
by proven leaders, group discussions, self-evaluation 
instruments and case studies. This course provides the 
conceptual framework to enable participants to identify and 
formulate a personalized action plan and the skill set to 
accomplish this plan. Candidates for this Certificate must 
submit a resume and schedule an interview prior to registration. 



Professional Studies 
and Certificate Programs 



Professional and Personal Development 
Computer Graphic Design 



127 



A+ Certification and MCSE Certification 

Microsoft Certified classes and COMPTia courses 
conducted at Fairfield University are held in 
cooperation with Spectrum Computer Solutions of 
Plymouth, Massachusetts - a Microsoft Certified 
Technical Education Center (Microsoft CTEC) and 
COMPTia Authorized Training Center. A designated 
program adviser is ready to talk to you about this 
exciting new opportunity for career advancement. For 
more information contact our A+/MCSE Advisor at 
(203)254-4220, ext. 4159. 



Business Management 

This certificate program is a skills-oriented learning 
opportunity designed especially for men and women 
who are seeking increased success for career 
advancement and greater job satisfaction. 

This individualized Business Management Certificate 
is offered to students in the School of Continuing 
Education. Each student meets with a counselor to 
design a program and select courses most applicable 
to his or her career goals. Each certificate includes six 
business courses in a concentration proposed by the 
student and approved by the Associate Dean. All 
courses in this certificate are taken for non-credit. 



Communication 

This program is designed for students preparing for a 
career in journalism, radio, television, or for more 
advanced study in writing/communications. Students 
have the opportunity to plan a course of study to achieve 
individual goals. Of the six required courses listed below, 
two must be beyond the introductory level. 

Required courses: 

2 courses in Written Communication 
2 courses in Visual Communication 
1 course in Verbal Communication 
1 Communication elective 



Fairfield University's Computer Graphic Design 
program sets the standard for education in the computer 
graphics industry today. Our continued success is the 
result of our ability to anticipate career opportunities in 
today's market while delivering programs that teach 
solid design solutions using the latest graphics software 
and techniques. Hundreds of our certificate graduates 
work in the forefront of today's print, multimedia and 
Internet design markets. We constantly update our 
courses and facilities to reflect the explosive growth in 
design and technology and its impact on the graphics 
industry. Our small classes are taught by experienced 
graphic designers and accommodate the busy schedules 
of our adult students. The Computer Graphics Design 
Certificate is customized to fit your interests, your 
experience and your future needs. Whether you are 
interested in pursuing a Computer Graphics Design 
Certificate or just want to take some classes to learn the 
latest software, please contact us for more information 
at (203) 254-4220. 

Each student must complete 8 1 2-week courses to earn 
a certificate. 

Some Computer Graphic Design courses may be taken 
for academic credit. 



Computer Graphic Courses 

For course descriptions and schedules check our web 
site at www.fairfield.edu/sce/clashour.htm or call for a 
School of Continuing Education semester catalog. 

Required courses: 

CG 20 Introduction: Computer Graphic Design 

CG 23 Visual Expression: Part I 

CG 24 Multimedia Design: Part I 

CG 31 Publication Design: Part I 

CG 33 Website Design: Part I 

CG 34 Graphic Design: Part I 

Elective courses: 

Choose two elective courses from any of our other 
courses in computer graphic design. 

General Graphic Design 

CG 43 Graphic Design: Part II 

Print Design 

CG 41 Publication Design: Part II 



Multimedia and Internet Design 
CG 35 Multimedia Design: Part II 
CG 39 Multimedia Design: Part III 
CG 44 Website Design: Part II 
CG 51 Internet Page Design: Part 



(Flash) 



128 



Professional and Personal Development 



Computer Graphic Courses 

CG 20 Computer Graphic Design: Introduction 

(Formally "Introduction to Adobe Photoshop and "Introduction 
to Adobe Illustrator") 

These two key programs which are fundamentals to the 
computer graphic design profession have been combined. 
This course covers the basic skills necessary to the effective 
applications of these programs. (3 credit option) 

CG 23 Visual Expression: Part I 

This course will help you develop the basic skills of graphic 
expression. You will concentrate on developing traditional 
drawing skills, the skills that you need to get your ideas on 
paper clearly and effectively. No drawing ability is necessary 
or assumed. Your will work primarily in pencil, but other media 
will be introduced. (3 credit option) 

CG 24 Multimedia Design: Part I 

Formerly Introduction to Multimedia. In this course you will 
learn the fundamentals of creating multimedia presentations. 
You will use PowerPoint to create effective presentations and 
will learn the design considerations unique to presentation 
graphics as well as the design skills fundamental to all graphic 
design. In addition to PowerPoint, you will be introduced to the 
other multimedia programs. (3 credit option) 

CG 31 Publication Design: Part I 

Learn the basic skills you will need to create attractive and 
readable publications. You will learn about the decision-making 
process of set up page size; establishing the width and number 
of columns; integration of line and continuous tone art; using 
type effectively, and the use of style sheets to increase 
efficiency. (3 credit option) 

CG 33 Website Design: Part I On-Line 
Learn the basics of Web/Internet Page Design. Topics include: 
information design and flow, small site layout, introduction to 
GUI, web color, basic HTML, and graphics using Adobe 
Photoshop or Macromedia Fireworks. Students will build their 
own websites. Prerequisites: CG 21 , CG 22 and CG 34 or 
equivalent. 

NOTE: This class will be offered Completely online, allowing 
students to learn at times which are convenient for them. 
Course materials, notes and discussions will all be held in a 
web-based environment. A computer (Pentium 133 or higher 
for windows, and a PowerPC 1 20 or higher for the Macintosh), 
a 4.0 browser, a text editor (Notepad or Simple Text) and 
Internet connection required for registration. For more 
information call Debbie Lauria (203) 254-4220 x 2911. 

(3 credit option) 

CG 34 Graphic Design: Part I 

(Formerly, Computer Graphics Basic Design) Develop your 
ability to translate ideas into a finished, well-designed product. 
You will use both Illustrator and Photoshop to develop your 
creative potential across a wide spectrum of applications. 
Some of the topics covered include understanding shapes, 
colors, basic composition, identifying target markets, and 
effective use of space. Prerequisites: CG 21 Introduction to 
Adobe Photoshop and CG 22 Introduction to Adobe Illustrator. 

(3 credit option) 



CG 35 Multimedia Design Part II (Flash) 

This is an intermediate class designed to teach the funda- 
mentals and applications of Macromedia Flash. The course 
introduces the concepts of designing in multimedia with 
interactivity. It will explore through examples of television 
commercials, movie/television credits, feature computer 
animation, web site design/animation, and computer game 
animation, how the interactive process enriches the impact for 
the end user. Macromedia Flash and Microsoft PowerPoint will 
be taught and reviewed and Dreamweaver and Director will be 
explored for web applications. Pre-requisites for this course 
are CG 20 or (21/22), CG 23, CG 24. Helpful but not required 
are CG 34 and CG 33. (3 credit option) 

CG 39 Multimedia Design Part III 

In this course you will integrate your experience from Multimedia 
Design Parts 1 (PowerPoint) and Part 2 (Macromedia Flash), 
as well as your knowledge of Photoshop, Illustrator, and your 
experience with other graphic programs. Flash will be the 
primary program used in this course. Prerequisites for this 
course are CG 21 , CG 22, CG 24, CG 34, CG 35, CG 43. 

(3 credit option) 

CG 41 Publication Design: Part II 

An continuation of "Print Design: Part I", this course extends 
your abilities to function in the field of print design. To accomplish 
this goal, you will receive instruction in more advanced use of 
the key print design programs (PageMaker and QuarkXpress), 
and you will continue to expand your understanding of the 
design concepts that lead to high impact print design. In this 
course we will also introduce you to the practical considerations 
of print production. You will learn the entire process from 
designing a printed piece on the computer to it's journey 
through a commercial printing firm and the problems and 
pitfalls that lie between concept and final product. A trip to a 
commercial printing firm is included in this course. 

(3 credit option) 

CG 43 Computer Graphic Design: Part II 

(Formerly, "Computer Graphic Advanced Design and Advanced 
Photoshop") This course uses and extends skills learned in 
"Computer Graphics Design: Part I". Design projects will allow 
students to apply their creativity and knowledge of software to 
work solutions encountered in design studios, corporate design 
departments and advertising agencies. Prerequisite: CG 34 
Computer Graphic Design: Part I. (3 credit option) 

CG 44 Website Design: Part II 

By the end of this course you will have built a 'prototype' web 
product or service. Topics covered will extend information 
covered in INTERNET DESIGN I, as well as introduce new 
concepts. Included are: Information Design and Flow Part II; 
Intermediate Site layout; Advanced GUI; HTML intermediate; 
Web graphics with Freehand Shockwave; animations with 
GIF's. Prerequisite for this course is CG 33. (3 credit option) 



Professional and Personal Development 



129 



CG 51 Internet Page Design: Part III 

In this course you will integrate your experience from Internet 
Page Design Parts 1 and 2, you knowledge of Photoshop, and 
your experience with Macromedia Flash to create websites. 
The primary program for creating websites will be Deamweaver 
and, while no Dreamweaver background is required, the 
prerequisites for the course are CG 21 , CG 22, CG 24, CG 33, 
CG 35 and CG 44. 

CG 70 The Business of Web Design 

As the Web continues its explosive growth, more designers are 
finding an exciting, and potentially large, market for their skills. 
This one-day seminar will explore the business side of web 
design, starting with the ways to find clients and progressing 
through the kind of hardware and software needed, and the 
always interesting question of charges and billing. 

CG 71 Understanding Web Technology 

This seminar is intended to clarify the technology of the internet 
at a conceptual level. We will discuss the proliferating "alphabet 
soup" that has become the jargon of the internet, the many 
components of the internet and how they interact, and other 
topics that will increase your understanding of this exciting new 
medium. 

CG 72 Publication Design Workshop: Part 1 

This two-day workshop will cover some of the many problems 
in developing effective print material. Topics covered will 
include layout, color, and production. Teaching will be through 
use of examples and exercises that will encourage the student 
to experiment with different solutions of design problems. 

CG 75 Web Design Workshop: Part 1 

This two-day workshop will allow you to explore different 
aspects of web site design including incorporating sound, 
animation, etc., as well as topics covering site efficiency, color, 
and navigation. 

CG 76 Web Design Workshop: Part 2 

This one-day workshop is a continuation of Part 1 and will 
extend and expand your knowledge of topics covered in that 
session. Prerequisite: Part 1 

CG 77 Web Design Using Front Page 

In this 2-day course, you will learn the fundamentals of 
Microsoft Front Page and how you can use it to create personal 
or business websites. Whether you choose this course or the 
Dreamweaver course (CG 89) depends on the software you 
will be using in web design. 

CG 83 HTML - Level I 

An introduction to HTML tags: View HTML Code, Copy Web 
Page Code, Modify HTML Code, Create an HTML Document, 
the HTML Editor, Define Header, Title, and Comments, the 
HTML Body. Modify Body Text, Format Font Properties, 
Preformatted Text, Logical Styles, Physical Styles, Lists. 
Footers, Insert an Inline Image, Bulleted Lists, Ordered Lists, 
Definition Lists, Menu Lists, Combine List Types. 



CG84 HTML -Level II 

Develop a variety of links and graphics: Explore Web Links. 
Links within a Page, Links to Related Pages, Links to Outside 
Pages, Hypermedia Links, Planning Sites, Navigation Menus. 
Links to Other Sites, Mailto Links, Text Only Web Pages. 
Capture Internet Graphics, Background Colors and Links, 
Background Images, Multiple Graphics. 

CG 85 HTML - Level III 

Explore advanced techniques: Align Using Preformatted text. 
Lists with Form Elements. Tables in Forms. Make a Grid. 
Multiple Forms, Graphic Resolutions/Sizes. Download Links. 
Client Pull, JavaScripts, and Interlaced GIF. a Transparent 
GIF, GIF Special Effects, GIF Animation, Background Sound. 
Real-Time AVI Videos. 

CG 86 HTML - Level IV 

Explore advanced techniques: Align Using Preformatted text. 
Lists with Form Elements, Tables in Forms, Make a Grid, 
Multiple Forms, Graphic Resolution/Sizes, Download Links, 
Client Pull, JavaScripts, and Interlaced GIF, a Transparent 
GIF, GIF Special Effects, GIF Animation, Background Sound. 
Real-Time AVI Videos. 

CG 87 Microsoft FrontPage: Part I 

An introduction to the Microsoft program FrontPage. A full day 
of developing web page designs and solutions with this new 
technology. Explore FrontPage, add pages to a web. use page 
templates, use spell check, find and replace, create bookmarks, 
create internal hyperlinks, create external hyperlinks, create 
an image hyperlink, create navigation tools, verify hyperlinks, 
use a Web Wizard, add and complete tasks, use a template, 
import files, manage web structure. 

CG 88 Java for Internet Design: Part I 

Java as the premier programming language of the Internet. 
Java applications can be used in conjunction with web specific 
scripts in Java, VB, Perl and CC++. and information on MacPerl. 
Take full advantage of Java's "write once run anywhere" 
capabilities overcoming communication problems across 
heterogeneous operating systems and networks, allowing 
seamless calls and updating throughout legacy systems. VRML 
2.0 Geometry Parser and DHTML tags with Dreamweaver will 
be reviewed. 

CG 89 Website Design Using DreamWeaver 

Learn how to use Macromedia's dynamite new visual web 
creation tool to create and maintain a website for home or 
business. Build web pages, imbed images with and without 
image maps, with multimedia as well as Javascript 
enhancements. 

CG 90 Microsoft FrontPage II 

A continuation of the Microsoft program FrontPage. A secondl 
day of developing web page designs and solutions with this 
new technology. Use the import Web Wizard, create headings 
and align text, insert inline graphics, apply and change themes. 
create and apply custom themes, add a page banner and 
navigation bar. apply and edit shared borders, use transparent 
images, convert graphic types, modify an image, create a hot 
spot. 



130 



Professional and Personal Development 



CG 91 Microsoft FrontPage III 

A continuation of the Microsoft program FrontPage. A third full 
day will focus of developing web page designs and solutions 
with this new technology. Modigy page layout, create a bulleted 
list, create a numbered list, create nested lists, define a table, 
format table cells, embed a table, add and modigy cell content, 
create a marquee, apply Dynamic HTML effects, use the 
banner ad manager, add a hover button, format page transitions, 
add audio and video effects, create a frameset, edit fram 
properties, add and delete frames. 

CG 92 Microsoft FrontPage IV 

A final, full day of developing web page designs and solutions 
using FrontPage. Includes: published webs; frames; boxes; 
buttons and dynamic elements. 

CG 94 Java for Internet Design: Part II 

Advanced JavaScripts are developed for validating user-entered 
text data, validating user-entered number data, validating 
user-entered check box data. Submit and Reset buttons for 
web-specific scripts in Java, VB, Perl and CC++. Integration 
with DHTML tags and Dreamweaver and MSFrontpage will be 
reviewed, in addition to scrolling text banners, multi-tables and 
multi-frames, allowing seamless calls and updating. 

CG 95 Adobe Photoshop Workshop 

This 2 half-day workshop will extend your understanding of and 
skills of Photoshop through hands-on exercises and class 
projects. Prerequisite: Introduction to Adobe Photoshop or 
equivalent experience. 

CG 96 Adobe Photoshop Workshop: Part 2 

This half-day workshop will extend your understanding of and 
skills of Photoshop through hands-on exercises and class 
projects. Prerequisite: Introduction to Adobe Photoshop or 
equivalent experience. 

CG 97 Adobe Illustrator Workshop 

This half-day workshop will extend your understanding of and 
skills with Adobe Illustrator through hands-on exercises and 
class projects. Prerequisite: Introduction to Adobe Illustrator or 
equivalent experience. 

CG 98 Adobe Illustrator Workshop: Part 2 

This half-day workshop is an extension of Part 1. We will 
continue work on exercises to enhance your Illustrator skills. 
Prerequisite: Adobe Illustrator Part 1. 

CG 105 Portfolio Workshop 

This two 1/2 day course examines the general techniques in 
preparing an effective portfolio. Students will bring in their own 
portfolios, or bring in the work they wish to include in their 
portfolios, for advice and discussion. The course is intended for 
students seeking guidance in assembling their first portfolio as 
well as those who would like to refine or modify and existing 
portfolio. 



Focus Seminars 

Our Focus Seminars concentrate on specific skills, 
technical aspects, and applications. They are constantly 
updated to reflect changes both in the industry and the 
needs of the students. Certificate students please note: 
Focus Seminars can be applied to a certificate as 
electives (4 Focus Seminars equal one, 12-week 
elective). 

Focus Seminars 

CG 70 The Business of Web Design 

CG 71 Understanding Web Technology 

CG 72 Publication Design Workshop: Part 1 

CG 75 Web Design Workshop: Part 1 

CG 89 Website Design Using DreamWeaver 

CG 95 Adobe Photoshop Workshop 

CG 97 Adobe Illustrator Workshop 

CG 105 Portfolio Workshop 



On-Line Web Based Computer 
Information System Courses 

Update your skills, discover a new talent or chart a 
career path at your own pace. Each on-line course runs 
for six weeks and consists of 12 lessons. The lessons 
are supplemented with interactive quizzes, assignments, 
tutorials and online discussion areas. All materials are 
made available to you over the World Wide Web. 

Participants need a computer and a Web Browser 
(Netscape or Internet Explorer). Simply register for the 
course and take the orientation by the registration/ 
orientation deadline. Each course costs $99.00. Call 
(203) 254-4220 for more information. 



Interior Design 



Professional and Personal Development 
Interior Design Courses 



131 



Interior Design 

This program is for students who are seriously committed 
to improving living and working environments and who 
wish to become visually articulate. The program aims to 
provide hands-on design experience, and training that 
enables students to translate abstract concept into 
three-dimensional reality. Students develop the kind of 
portfolio and style of presentation that are the mark of a 
professional. Some courses in this program may be 
taken for academic credit. Upon satisfactory completion 
of 9 required courses and one required elective, plus a 
favorable evaluation of the portfolio, students receive a 
Certificate of Completion. 

Courses listed below in Group A are prerequisite to 
those in Group B, followed by more advanced courses 
in Group C. Electives vary during the academic year. 

Required Courses - ten required courses and a favorable 
evaluation of portfolio. To enhance their knowledge of 
the interior design field, students are encouraged to take 
additional elective offerings, such as CADD, Business 
of Interior Design and others. 

Group A - Required: 

Interior Design I 
History of Furniture 
Drawing and Presentation 



Group B - Required: 

Perspective Techniques 
Interior Design II 
Color Design 
History of Furniture II 
Lighting for Interiors 

Group C - Required: 

Commercial Design 
Interior Design III 

Various optional electives are offered throughout the 
year. 



IN 109 CADD: 

Computer Aided Design and Drafting 

This two-day course introduces computer aided design 
Students learn the basic skills to create both plan and elevation 
drawings, as well as the ability to edit existing drawings. 
Students need to have basic computer skills including use of 
the mouse. (non credit only) 

IN 110 Interior Design I 

An introduction to developing the judgment and skill to conceive 
and execute a successful residential interior design project. 
Weekly design problems present the appropriate integration of 
aesthetics and function. Students experience the issues and 
difficulties a professional must face, learning the appropriate 
steps from client interview to presenting accurate scale drawings 
in plan and elevation. Finally, students present a total interior 
environment complete with furniture layout and selection, 
color, pattern and full architectural details. For the first class 
students should bring supplies listed in the course syllabus 
available in the School of Continuing Education office. 

(3 credit option) 

IN 113 History of Furniture I 

This course examines the major styles of furniture from 
Egyptian through the Renaissance and Baroque (15th-17th 
centuries) to the Rococo and Neoclassical periods (early 19th 
century). Examples are drawn mainlyfrom Italy. France. England 
and Germany, with emphasis on mastering the specific features 
of each style and on acquiring and understanding the ideas that 
shaped the thinking and influenced the furnishing practices in 
each era. Two class sessions are presented at the Metropolitan 
Museum of Art. New York City. Second section offered in the 
Spring. Both sections are required and should be taken in 
sequence. (3 credit option) 

IN 114 History of Furniture 

American furniture from 1650-1830 and its relationship to 
English prototypes. The course also covers Victorian furniture 
styles through contemporary trends both in the U.S. and in 
Europe. Emphasis is on learning the characteristics of each 
period as well as a discussion of the material culture of the time. 

(3 credit option) 

IN 119 Drawing and Presentation 

An introduction to drafting techniques for the preparation of 
architectural interior drawings emphasizing drafting and 
detailing room plans, elevations and sections. Covers drafting 
for architectural purposes, drawings for client presentation, 
techniques of presentation, and board mounting. A final project 
with finished floor plans, elevations, and sample boards is 
required. The instructor will inform students of supplies to be 
brought to class. Students with no previous experience in 
drawing should take this course first. (3 credit option) 



132 



Professional and Personal Development 



IN 120 Decorative Arts 

This course provides students with new ways to look at 
objects, and is of interest to collectors, designers or anyone 
interested in the history of art. In the study of material culture, 
objects are used as documents which can inform us about the 
culture that produced them. Evidence of national, political or 
regional differences can be found as well as gender and social 
bias. (non credit only) 

IN 211 Interior Design II 

Building on the design fundamentals of Interior Design I, 
students continue to develop their abilities at space planning, 
learning to prepare and deliver persuasive presentations. 
Expanding knowledge of tools designers have to work with, 
including color, special finishes, building materials, furnishings, 
fabrics, window treatments, floor coverings, and accessories. 
Special emphasis on kitchen and bath design. Weekly lectures. 
Creativity and problem solving skills are fostered through a 
series of residential design projects reinforcing the logical 
nature of the design process. Discussion of business procedures 
is also planned. Final project to include floor plans, elevations, 
color, furniture selections, and budget estimates. Students 
should bring drawing materials to first class. (3 credit option) 

IN 212 Interior Design III 

Students present only one project. They document, by blueprint 
and/or photos, an existing residential space, including complete 
floor plans, furniture detailing, prospective drawing of one 
space, lighting plans, and detailed presentation boards, showing 
all fabrics, furniture, wall coverings and rugs obtained solely 
from New York showrooms. Students prepare a spec book. 
The project equips the student with a comprehensive 
presentation covering the entire course content. 

(3 credit option) 

IN 214 Commercial Design 

Students learn the importance of the surrounding environment 
in a working situation and professional techniques for planning 
and executing business interiors. Readings, lectures, project 
organization and studio assignments stress the principles of 
good design and the practical skills needed to function 
professionally. Students should bring to the first class a drawing 
board, scale ruler, a 12 foot roll of canary tracing paper and 
black felt tip pens. (3 credit option) 

IN 215 Lighting for Interiors 

Introduces the various types of lighting equipment and their 
effects. How to draw an accurate lighting plan and enhance 
interior designs with light. A tour of Lightolier Designer 
Showroom will show the effects possible with today's 
incandescent and fluorescent lighting. One session is a field 
trip. (non credit only) 

IN 216 Kitchen and Bath Design 

This course presents the fundamentals of space planning, 
materials, equipment, and aesthetics for professionals planning 
to work with clients in designing kitchens and baths. Layout, 
problem solving, elements of design, product information, 



mechanical systems, lighting, colorand special needs planning 
are presented. Using case studies, the students learn drafting 
and presentation techniques as well as the steps necessary to 
see a project through to completion. (8 sessions) 

(non credit only) 

IN 220 Perspective Techniques 

Builds on the students basic knowledge of planning and interior 
space, and teaches the techniques of interior perspective. 
Completed projects become part of the student's portfolio. 
A basic, easy to understand method of perspective drawing 
is used. (3 credit option) 

IN 221 Business of Interior Design 

Illustrates the role of the interior designer as a business- 
person, with emphasis on the client/designer relationship as 
well as the organizational skills needed to run a successful 
business. Students analyze and discuss client/business related 
problems, and experience the process of following one project 
from design conception to final billing of services. 

(non credit only) 



Institute for Retired Professionals 

RP Institute for Retired Professionals 

Designed to meet the intellectual needs of professionals 
retired from careers in industry, government and 
education. It provides the opportunity for retirees to use 
their experience and talent in seminars and discussion 
groups led by Fairfield University faculty and experts 
from the community. Members may audit one 
undergraduate credit course per semester from a list of 
selected courses. For further information and/or a 
program brochure, call (203) 254-4220. 



Open Visions Forum 



The Open Visions Forum, a University-wide program of 
the School of Continuing Education, is designed to 
challenge "the life of the mind" and features superstars 
from the worlds of Broadway, journalism, film, literature, 
the arts and education. Past guest lecturers have 
included Phillipe de Montebello, Frances Mayes, Helen 
Thomas, George Stephanopoulus, Stephen Sondheim, 
Morris Dees, Gloria Steinem, Mary Travers, William F. 
Buckley, Tony Kushner, Daniel Schorr, Mia Farrow and 
many more. All lectures take place at the Quick Center 
for the Arts. Call the Quick Center Box Office for ticket 
information at (203) 254-4010. 



Professional and Personal Development 



133 



Certificate in Financial Planning 

This Certificate in Financial Planning™ will meet the 
needs of professionals who work to assist and serve 
clients in planning for present and future financial 
security. The program is designed for people working in 
financial planning, insurance, banking, investments, 
accounting and law as well as other professionals 
interested in learning more about the financial planning 
process. The curriculum is designed to meet and 
exceed the criteria set by the CFP™ Board of Standards 
and will result in successful financial planning learning 
outcomes and a positive learning environment. The 
program encourages students to pursue the CFP™ 
designation and prepare appropriately for a career as a 
personal financial planner. Through this new Certificate 
in Financial Planning™ a strong student/faculty/ 
community network can be established to support the 
community's need for well-educated and informed 
personal financial planning professionals. 

BB 130 Fundamentals and Principles of Personal 

Financial Planning 
BB 134 Investment Planning 
BB 132 Insurance Planning and Risk Management 
BB 136 Federal Income and Property Taxation 
BB 138 Retirement Planning and Employer 

Sponsored Benefits 
BB140 Estate Planning 

For course descriptions visit our website at 
www.fairfield.edu/sce/clashour.htm. 

Admission: Students must have completed a Bachelor 
Degree. Students should have some knowledge of 
accounting principles, finance and economics gained 
either through academic courses or on-the-job learning. 
Students should have an interest in pursuing a career in 
personal financial planning. 

All courses in this program are taken on a non-credit 
basis. Courses are evaluated with a letter grade. 

Upon completion of all courses offered, a Fairfield 
University certificate will be awarded. 



Writing Certificate 



This certificate program is for beginners as well as 
advanced writers. New writers hone their skills and 
develop discipline as well as creativity; more advanced 
writers learn to let go of old habits and take some new 
risks. Student works are presented regularly for group 
response and evaluation. An integral aspect of the 
writing program is the talent and experience of the 
faculty. All are published writers eager to share their skill 
and love of writing. Students must have completed two 
introductory college level writing courses or the equivalent 
before enrolling in the program. Upon satisfactory 
completion of eight upper level writing courses, a 
certificate of completion will be awarded. Courses must 
be from both fiction and non-fiction genres. 



More Professional and Personal 
Development Courses 

The School of Continuing Education offers a number 
of Professional and Personal Development courses 
each semester that are not part of a certificate 
program. Some examples. Return to Nursing. Manhattan 
Art Tours, Acting Workshop. Antiques. People's Law 
School, GMAT/LSAT Prep course, Insurance. ABC's of 
Proofreading, and Computer Training on-line courses. 



134 



Professional and Personal Development 



DIRECTORY 



I vjO Faculty 
Faculty - Credit 



Credit 



Rochelle Almeida 

B.A., M.A., M.Phil.. Ph.D., University of Bombay 

Barbara Amodio 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Degree Superieur de Hautes Etudes et Civilization, 

University of Aix-Marseille, France 

Kazuka Avery 

B.A., Miyagi Gakuin Women's College, Sendai, Japan 
M.S., Southern CT State University 

Peter Bayers 

B.A., Villanova University 
M.A., New York University 
Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 

Steven Bayne 

B.A.. Evangel College 

M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Leona Bayusik 

B.A., Fairfield University 
M.A.L.S., Wesleyan University 

Barbara Benjamini 

B.A., M.A., University of Bridgeport 

Peter Benson 

B.S., University of New Haven 
M.A., Goddard College 

Christine Berte 

A.A.S.. B.A., Pace University 
M.S.N.. F.N. P., Fairfield University 

Anna Maria Bianco 

B.A.. Hunter College 

M.A.. University of Cincinnati 

Dorothea Braginsky 

Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Queens College 

M.A., Ph.D.. University of Connecticut 

Diane Brousseau 

Professor of Biology 

B.A.. Ph.D.; University of Massachusetts, Amherst 

Richard Burch 

B.A., Dartmouth College 
M.B.A.. New York University 
M.A., Columbia University 

Eleanor Burke 

B.A.. St. Joseph's College 
M.A.. New York University 

Jamie Callan 

B.A.. Bard College 
M.A.. Goddard College 
M.F.A., U.C.L.A. 



Javier Campos 

Associate Professor of Modern Languages 

and Literatures 

Pedagogia en Espanol, Universidad de 

Concepcion (Chile) 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

William Carr, S.J. 

B.A., Boston College 
S.T.L, Woodstock College 

Marco Castaldi 

B.S., Manhattan College 
M.A., Ph.D., UCLA 

William Castelot 

B.A., University of New Haven 

Gerald Cavallo 

Associate Professor of Marketing 

B.B.A., Pace College 

M.B.A., Columbia University 

M.B.A., Ph.D., City University of New York 

Suzanne Chamlin 

B.A.. Columbia University 

M.F.A.. Yale University School of Art 

Debnam Chappell 

Assistant Professor of English 
B.S.. College of William and Mary 
M.A., University of Bridgeport 
Ph.D., New York University 

Arjun Chaudhuri 

Professor of Marketing 

B.A., M.A., Calcutta University 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Theodore Cheney 

B.A., M.A., Boston University 
M.A., Fairfield University 

Elia Chepaitis 

Associate Professor of Information Systems 
B.A., Manhattanville College 
M.A., Georgetown University 
M.B.A., University of New Haven 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Joanne Choly 

B.S., M.A., Fairfield University 

Steven Clarke 

Diploma Institute Audio Research 
Owner, Project One Studio 

Thomas Clifford 

A.B.. Boston University 

J.D., University of Connecticut 

Aviva Cohen 

B.A., Sacred Heart University 
M.S., University of Bridgeport 
Ph.D.. City University of New York 



Credit 

J. Brooks Colburn 

A.B., Stanford University 
MA, College of Philadelphia 
Ph.D., UCLA 

Thomas Conine, Jr. 

Professor of Finance 

B.S.. University of Connecticut 

M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Carol Connery 

B.S.N.. Skidmore College 
M.S.N., University of Pennsylvania 

Ralph Coury 

Professor of History 

B.A., Hamilton College 

M.A., Ph.D.. Princeton University 

Mary Crowley 

B.A., Loyola College of Maryland 
M.B.A., Fairfield University 

Thomas Cunningham 

B.S., M.S., Southern Connecticut State University 

Joseph D'Agostin 

B.A., Fairfield University 
M.B.A., New York University 

John David 

B.A., Fordham University 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Rochester 

Paul Davis 

Professor Emeritus of History 
A.B., M.A., University of Notre Dame 

Wesley Davis 

B.A., M.A., Southern Connecticut State University 

Albert De Vidas 

B.A., Brooklyn College 

M.A., Ph.D.. New York University 

Diplome, Colege of Europe in Belgium 

Edward Deak 

Professor of Economics 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Richard DeAngelis 

Professor Emeritus of History 

Certificate. Far Eastern Languages. Yale University 

B.S.S.. M.A., Fairfield University 

Ph.D., St. John's University 

Susan Delbene 

Catherine Dillingham 

Barbara Dolyak 

B.A., M.S.. Southern Connecticut State University 
R.N., Bridgeport Hospital School of Nursing 

Peter Dresch 

B.A., Brooklyn College 

M.S., Polytechnic Institute of New York 



Faculty 



137 



JoAnn Drusbosky 

B.S., Villanova University 
M.S.. University of New Haven 

Sandra Ducoffe 

Associate Professor of Marketing 

B.A.. University of Michigan 

M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Pamela Dudac 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
A.B.. Manhattanville College 
M.S., Fordham University 
M.S.N.. New York Medical College 

Therese Dykeman 

B.S., Creighton University 
M.A., Loyola University 
Ph.D., The Union Institute 

Mark Edinberg 

B.A., Trinity College 

M.A.. University of Cincinnati 

Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Philip Eliasoph 

Professor of Visual and Performing Arts 
A.B., Adelphi University 
M.A., Ph.D.. State University of New York 
at Binghamton 

Eileen Fagan 

B.A., Mount Saint Vincent College 
M.S., Yeshiva University 
Ph.D., Fordham University 

Sandra Fillion 

Benjamin Fine 

Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Brooklyn College 

M.S.. Ph.D., Courant Institute. New York University 

Joan Fleitas 

Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S.N, Florida State University 

M.S.N.. Emory University 

Ed.D.. Teachers College. Columbia University 

Robert Ford 

B.E.E.. Yale University 

M.S., Financial Management. Fairfield University 

Robert Ford, Jr. 

B.S., Fairfield University 
M.Ed,; Harvard University 
C.A.S.; Fairfield University 

Harold Forsythe 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., M.A.. Chapman University 

P.H.D. Candidate, University of California. San Diego 

John Franco 

B.S.. M.B.A.. University of Bridgeport 



138 



Faculty 



Edward Giegengack 

B.S., Villanova University 
M.A., Fairfield University 

Rosemarie Gorman 

B.A., Sacred Heart University 
M.A., Fairfield University 
M.A.R., Yale Divinity School 
Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

Donald Greenberg 

Associate Professor of Politics 

A.B., Alfred University 

Ph.D., City University of New York 

Philip Greiner 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S., Nursing, Albright College 
MSN, DNSc, University of Pennsylvania 

Sheila Grossman 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S., University of Connecticut 
M.S., University of Massachusetts 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

William Guelakis 

Assistant Professor, School of Engineering 
B.S., M.S., University of New Haven 

Michael Guglielmo 

B.S., Fairfield University 
M.A.W., Fordham University 

Jane Hackett 

Joseph Hajla 

A.S.M.E., B.S.M.E. 

Mary Ann Haley 

B.A., University of Notre Dame 
M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Robert Hardy 

ASID, University of Massachusetts 
New York School of Interior Design 
Independent Designer and founder of Walls Up 

David Heiden 

B.S., Bucknell University 

Completing Master of Science Degree, 

Southern Connecticut State University 

Suzanne Heim-Loggie 

B.A., Hunter College 

M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Lisa Hess 

B.F.A., Philadelphia College of Art 
M.F.A., Yale University School of Art 

Malcolm Hill 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., Colby College 

Ph.D., University of Houston 



Credit 

W. Nickerson Hill 

Associate Professor of 
Modern Languages and Literatures 
B.A., Wabash College 
M.A., University of Hawaii 
Ph.D., University of Iowa 

Karen Hills 

B.S., N.J. Institute of Technology 
M.S., Ph.D., New York University 

Walter Hlawitschka 

Associate Professor of Finance 
B.S., M.B.A., Cornell University 
Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Elizabeth Hohl 

B.A., Stonehill College 

M.A., Sarah Lawrence College 

Hugh Humphrey 

Professor of Religious Studies 
A.B., St. Bernard's Seminary 
M.A., University of Louvain 
Ph.D., Fordham University 

Christopher Huntley 

Assistant Professor of Information Systems 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Jack Kamerman 

B.A., Brooklyn College 
Ph.D., New York University 

Lawrence Kazura 

Assistant Professor of History 
A.B., Queens College 
M.A., Clark University 

Patrick Kennedy 

ASID, Inchblad School of Design, London, England 

Gregory Koutmos 

Professor of Finance 

B.S., Graduate School of Business Studies, 

Athens, Greece 

M.A., City College of City University of New York 

Ph.D., Graduate School and University Center, CUNY 

Janet Krauss 

Lecturer in English 
B.A., Brandeis University 
M.A., Fairfield University 

Robert Kravet 

Assistant Professor of Accounting 
A.B., Southern Connecticut State College 
B.S., University of New Haven 
M.S., University of Massachusetts 
C.P.A., Connecticut 

Ralph Langanke 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
M.B.A., University of Bridgeport 



Credit 

Jean Lange 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N., State University of New York 
M.N.. University of UCLA 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Patrick Lee 

Associate Professor of Operations Management 

A.B., Berea College 

M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Victor Leeber, S.J. 

Professor of Modern Languages 
A.B., M.A., Boston College 
S.T.L., Weston College 
Ph.D., University of Madrid 

Attila Levai 

M.S., Southern Connecticut State University 
B.S., C.A.S., Fairfield University 



Faculty 



139 



Seth Lewis 

B.S.. M.B.A. 



University of Bridgeport 



James Licari 

B.S., City College of the City University of New York 
M.S., Ph.D, Pennsylvania State University 
M.S., Steven Institute of Technology 

Robert Liftig 

B.A., University of Maryland 

M.A., Central Connecticut State University 

M.Ed., Ed.D., Columbia University 

Mark Ligas 

Assistant Professor of Marketing 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania 
M.S., Pennsylvania State University 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Doris Lippman 

Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N. , Cornell University 
M.Ed., Ed.D., Columbia University 

Mengiun Liu 

B.A., Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China 

R. James Long 

Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., St. Mary's College 

M.S.L., Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies 

Ph.D., University of Toronto 

John Maarbjerg 

M.S., University of Denmark 
M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Suzanne MacAvoy 

Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N. Ed., College of Misericordia 
M.S.N., Boston College 
Ed.D., Columbia University 



Michael Maccarone 

Controller, Fairfield University 
B.S.. St. Francis College, New York 
M.S., Fairfield University 

John MacDonald 

Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., M.S., Boston College 
Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Joseph MacDonnell. S.J. 
Professor of Mathematics 
A.B., M.A., Boston College 
M.S., Fordham University 
Ed.D., Columbia University 

Diane Mager 

B.S.N., Fairfield University 

M.S.N., Western Connecticut State University 

Lisa Mainiero 

Professor of Management 

B.A., Smith College 

M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 

Anne Manton 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N. , Boston State College 
M.S.N., Boston College 
Ph.D. University of Rhode Island 

Bernice Marie-Daly 

B.A., Amherst College 
M.S., St. John's University 
Ph.D., The Union Institute 

R. Keith Martin 

Schramm Professor of Information Systems 

A.B., Whitman College 

M.B.A., City College New York 

Ph.D., University of Washington 

P.E., California 

CDP, CSP 

Dawn Massey 

Assistant Professor of Accounting 
B.S., M.B.A., Fordham University 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
C.P.A., Connecticut 

Arthur McAdams 

B.S., Fairfield University 
M.B.A., University of Connecticut 

John McCarthy 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Boston College 

M.A., Ph.D., Catholic University 

Rosalie McDevitt 

Assistant Professor of Accounting 
B.S., St. Thomas Aquinas College 
M.B.A.. Pace University 
C.P.A.. New York 



140 



Faculty 



Credit 



Sharlene McEvoy 

Professor of Business Law 

B.A., Albertus Magnus College 

M.A., Trinity College 

J.D., University of Connecticut 

Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles 

Diane Menagh 

Assistant Professor of English 
A.B., Manhattanville College 
M.A., Indiana University 
Ph.D., City University of New York 

John Mendelsohn 

B.A., Columbia University 
M.F.A., Rutgers University 

PeiMi 

B.S., Nankai University, Tianjin, P.R. of China 
M.D., Tianjin Medical University, P.R. of China 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Aliki Michalaros-Sciascia 

B.M., University of Hartford 
M.A., Columbia University 

Diana Mille 

B.A., Rutgers College 

M.A., Hunter College 

M.Phil., Ph.D., The Graduate School, City University 

of New York 

John Mitnick 

B.A., St. Mary College 
M.S., New York University 
Ph.D., New York University 

Erin Moore 

B.S., Fairfield University 

Neil Morse 

B.A., University of Bridgeport 
M.A., Fairfield University 

Lisa Newton 

Professor of Philosophy 

B.S., Ph.D.; Columbia University 

Victor Newton 

Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., M.A., Spring Hill College 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Rodrigo Obando 

B.S., Instituto Technologico de Costa Rica 
M.S., Ph.D., Old Dominion University 

Edmond O'Connell 

Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Providence College 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Leo O'Connor 

Professor of American Studies 

B.S., St. Peter's College 

M.A., Ph.D., New York University 



Sally O'Driscoll 

Associate Professor of English 
B.A., Queens College, City University of New York 
M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., The Graduate School of the 
City University of New York 

John Orman 

Professor of Politics 
B.S., Indiana State University 
M.A., Ball State University 
Ph.D., Indiana University 

Eileen O'Shea 

Yvonne Pacifico 

B.S. Adelphi University 

M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University 

Lynne Penczer 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Elena Pischikova 

B.A., M.A., Moscow University 
Ph.D., Institute of Oriental Studies of the USSR 
Researcher, Egyptian Wing, Metropolitan Museum 
of Art 

Carole Pomarico 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N. , Carlow College 
M.S.N., University of Pittsburgh 
M.S., M.A., Fairfield University 

Thomas Porter 

B.S., University of Maryland 

M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Ph.D., University of Washington 

Judith Primavera 

Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Mount Holyoke College 
M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 

Thomas Ragozzino 

B.S., Fairfield University 
M.A., Trinity College 
C.A.S., Fairfield University 

Gita Rajan 

Associate Professor of English 
B.A., Banaras Hindu University 
M.A., University of Oklahoma 
Ph.D., University of Arizona 

Mark Ramsey 

B.S., Eastern Connecticut State University 

Wayne Raulerson 

B.S., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn 

Ipshita Ray 

Assistant Professor of Marketing 
B.A., M.A., Jadavpur Univeristy 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 



Credit 

Gloria Redlich 

B.A., University of Rhode Island 
M.A., University of Bridgeport 

Charles Reed 

B.S., University of Tennessee 
M.B.A., Sacred Heart University 

Thomas Regan, S.J. 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Boston College 

M.A., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Pamela Revak 

Assistant Professor of Taxation and Business Law 

B.S., Fairfield University 

J.D., Boston College 

Master of Law of Taxation, Boston University 

Jacqueline Rinaldi 

B.A., College of Mt. St. Vincent 
M.A., English, Fordham University 
M.A., American Studies, Fairfield University 
M.A., Communications, Fairfield University 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Rose Rodrigues 

Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 

B.A., Southern Illinois University 

M.A., Ph.D., New School for Social Research 

Lowell Rutkove 

B.A., M.B., Brooklyn College, City University of 
New York 

Kristi Sacco 

B.S., Villanova University 
M.A., Fairfield University 
M.A., University of Hartford 

Harold Sanchez 

B.S., Fairfield University 

M.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook 

Chris Schmidt 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

David Schmidt 

Associate Professor of Religious Studies 
B.S., Illinois State University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Aaron Seymour 

B.S., Fairfield University 
M.B.A., Fairfield University 

Lisa Shuchter 

B.A., Hofstra University 

M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University 

Michael Simon 

B.S., Cooper Union 
M.S., New York University 



141 



Faculty 

James Simon 

Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Rutgers University 

MMC, DPA, Arizona State University 

Stacey Skar 

B.A., University of Illinois 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Jay Sommer 

B.A., Brooklyn College 
M.A., Hunter College 
M.A., Fordham University 

Peter Spoerri 

Associate Professor of Computer Science 
B.S., Ph.D., Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute 
M.S., Oregon State University 

David Steffen 

B.A., Fairfield University 

Stage Manager for Fairfield University productions 

Mark Stepsis 

B.A., Williams College 
M.A., New York University 

Jane Swergold 

Janet Tanner 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College 
M.B.A., Columbia University 
M.A., Yale University 

John Thiel 

Professor of Religious Studies 

A.B., Fairfield University 

M.A., Ph.D., McMaster University 

Frederick Thurberg 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Massachusetts 
M.S., Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 

Brian Torff 

Assistant Professor of Visual and Performing Arts 

B.E.S., M.S., University of Bridgeport 

C.A.S., Fairfield University 

Conductor, Fairfield University Jazz Ensemble 

Michael Tucker 

Professor of Finance 
B.A., Washington College 
M.B.A., D.B.A., Boston University 

Melinda Tuhus 

B.A., University of Wisconsin 
M.S., Quinnipiac College 

Richard Tyler 

Assistant Professor of Management 
B.S., College of the Holy Cross 
M.Ed., Boston College 
M.B.A.. New York University 



142 



Faculty 



David Ulizio 

B.A., Fairfield University 
M.S., Springfield College 
Additional Graduate Studies, University of Hartford 

Rosemary Vogt 

B.S.N., Marquette University 
M.S.N. , DePaul University 
Ed.D., Northern Illinois University 

Robert Watson 

B.Sc, Lewis & Clark College 

M.B.A., University of Southern California 

Robert Webber 

B.A., New York University 
M.B.A., Columbia University 

Gary Weddle 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Thiel College 

Ph.D., University of Delaware 

Katherine Weirs 

Thomas Westbrook 

B.A., State University Potsdam, New York 
M.S., Boston University 

Kathleen Wheeler 

Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Cornell University 

M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Marion White 

B.A., M.F.A., Sarah Lawrence College 

David Wolfsdorf 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., Boston University 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Donald Wolk 

B.A., City College of New York 
Ph.D., Adelphi University 

Mark Worden 

Professor of Psychology 
A.B., Bellarmine College 
M.S., Ph.D., St. Louis University 

Kathryn Jo Yarrington 

Associate Professor of Visual and Performing Arts 
B.F.A., B.A.E., M.F.A., Ohio State University 

Eugenia Zavras 

B.A., University of Bridgeport 
M.S., University of Bridgeport 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 



Professional and Personal Development 

Faculty - Professional and 

Personal Development 

Howard Abbott 

Coordinator of the Fairfield University 
Computer Graphics Institute 
Owner of Wilcor Associates 

Gerri Babiarz 

B.S., SUNY Potsdam 

Jon Barb 

B.S., University of Notre Dame 

M.A., Graduate School of Management and Urban 

Policy, New School for Social Research, New York 

Jeffrey Bouvier 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Consultant in communications skills for ten years. 

Specializing in presentation and business writing skills. 

William Brown 

B.A., Tufts University 

David Butzko 

B.S., Industrial Design, University of Bridgeport 

Kevin Carroll 

B.S., Marketing State University of New York at Albany 
M.B.A., Fordham University 

Richard Fogarty 

A.B., Harvard College Business School 1963 
Columbia Advanced Management Program 1984 

Peter Franz 

B.F.A., Graphic Design, School of Visual Arts, NY, NY 

Gary Freeman 

B.S., St. Lawrence University 
M.S., Queens College (CUNY) 
Partner, Monroe Insurance Center 

Edward Giegengack 

B.S., Villanova University 
M.A., Fairfield University 

Joel Goldfield 

Associate Professor of 
Modern Languages and Literatures 
B.A., Dartmouth College 
M.A., Brandeis University 
Ph.D., Universite Paul Valery 

Jerrold Gregory 

B.B.A., Clarkson University 
M.B.A., University of Tampa 
C.M.A. 

Robert Hardy 

ASID, University of Massachusetts 
New York School of Interior Design 



Administration 

David Heiden 

B.S., Bucknell University 

M.S. candidate, Southern Connecticut State University 

Kristen Howard 

B.A., History of Science, Kirkland/Hamilton College 
M.B.A., Finance, NYU Stern School of Business 

Christopher Huntley 

Assistant Professor of Information Systems 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Kevin Kealey 

A.B., Fairfield University 

M.A., University of Vermont 

President, Kevin M. Kealey Associates, Management 

Consulting 

Louise Ladd 

B.A., Wellesley College 

Richard Lafferty 

B.A., LaSalle College 

M.G.A., University of Pennsylvania 

J.D., University of Connecticut 

William Lovett 

Management Development and Human Relations 
Training Specialist 

Mary Jo McGonagle 

B.F.A., School of Visual Arts, NYC 

Marie Metz 

B.A., University of Bridgeport 

Greg Mursko 

Creative Art Director for Boucher Communications Inc. 

Richard Ploss 

Senior Analyst, Eutechtics, Inc., Norwalk, Conn. 

Richard Russo 

B.S., Polytechnic Institute of New York in 
electrical engineering 
M.S. in Organizational Development and 
Human Resources 

Jane Swergold 

ASID; B.A., University of Pennsylvania 
Studies at the Graduate School of Architecture, 
Philadelphia Museum College of Art and L'Ecole de 
Louvre, Paris 

Doug Taylor 

B.A., University of California at Berkeley 

Bud Titsworth 

President, Titsworth & Company 

Marc Wisniewski 

B.S., Eastern Connecticut State University 

Joyce Zimmerman 

B.A., Brooklyn College 



Faculty 



143 



President 



Aloysius P. Kelley, S.J., Ph.D. 
President 
Charles H. Allen, S.J., M.A. 

Executive Assistant to the President 
Paul E. Carrier, S.J., Ph.D. 

University Chaplain 
James M. Bowler, S.J., Ph.D. 

Facilitator of Jesuit Mission and Identity 
Eugene P. Doris, MAT. 

Director of Athletics and Recreation 



Board of Trustees (osofs/oi) 

Joseph F. Berardino 72 

James J. Bigham '59 

Patrick J. Carolan, M.D. '59, P'85, '89 

E. Gerald Corrigan, Ph.D. '63 

James M. Cotter '64 

Joseph A. DiMenna, Jr. '80 

Charles F. Dolan P'85, '86 

Daniel R. Finn, Jr. '66 

Mario J. Gabelli 

Vincent A. Gierer, Jr. 

L. Edward Glynn, S.J. 

Sylvester Green, Sr. 

Charles E. Hanley P'90, '97 

Marian L. Heard M'95, P'88 

Otto H. Hentz, S.J. 

Paul J. Huston '82 

James F. Keenan, S.J. 

Aloysius P. Kelley, S.J. 

Charles F. Kelley, S.J. 

Ned C. Lautenbach 

Stephen M. Lessing 76 

Kathi P. Loughlin '80 

Roger M. Lynch '63, P'95 (Chair) 

Joseph D. Macchia '57 

J. Thomas McClain, S.J. 

Michael E. McGuinness '82 

William A. Mcintosh P'86, '92 

John C. Meditz 70 

Diane Oakley 75 

Thomas C. Quick 77 

Lawrence C. Rafferty '64, P'04 

Mary Dillon Reynolds 79 

Rosellen Walsh Schnurr 74 

Elisabeth H. Schwabe 74 

Carolyn Vermont-Fuller '82, M'84 

Francis T. Vincent, Jr. 

William P. Weil '68 

Trustees Emeriti 

James W. Birkenstock 
Alphonsus J. Donahue 
David W.P. Jewitt 
Francis J. McNamara, Jr. 
L. William Miles P'84, '85, '95 



144 



Faculty 



Academics 



Administration 



Finance 



Orin L. Grossman, Ph.D. 
Academic Vice President 
Mary Frances A. Malone, Ph.D. 

Associate Academic Vice President 
R. Edwin Wilkes, M.A. 

Associate Academic Vice President 

for Enrollment Planning 
Georgia F. Day, Ph.D. 

Assistant Academic Vice President, 

TRIO Programs 
Timothy L. Snyder, Ph.D. 

Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 

Thomas J. Regan, S.J. 
Associate Dean 
Norman A. Solomon, Ph.D. 

Dean, Charles F. Dolan School of Business 

Cynthia S. Chegwidden, M.B.A. 
Assistant Dean, Graduate Programs 

Aaron Seymour 

Assistant Dean. Undergraduate Programs 
Edna Farace Wilson, Ed.D. 

Dean, School of Continuing Education 

Susan M. Fitzgerald, M.A. 

Associate Dean, Non-Credit Programs 

Margaret A. Glick, Ed.D. 

Associate Dean, Credit Programs 
Evangelos Hadjimichael, Ph.D. 

Dean, School of Engineering 

Richard G. Weber, Ph.D. 
Associate Dean 
Jeanne L. Novotny, Ph.D. 

Dean, School of Nursing 

Theresa T. Quell, M.S. 

Assistant Dean 

Margaret C. Deignan, Ph.D. 

Dean, Graduate School of Education 

and Allied Professions 

Karen L. Creecy, M.A. 

Assistant Dean 

M. Debnam Chappell, Ph.D. 

Dean of Freshmen 
Robert C. Russo, M.A. 

University Registrar 
Judith M. Dobai, M.A. 

Director of Admission 
Susan F. Kadir, M.P.A. 

Director of Financial Aid 



William J. Lucas, M.B.A. 

Vice President for Finance and Treasurer 



Information Resources and Services 

James A. Estrada, M.L.I.S. 

Vice President of Information Services 
and University Librarian 



Student Services 

William P. Schimpf, M.Ed. 

Vice President for Student Services 



University Advancement 

George E. Diffley, M.A. 

Vice President for University Advancement 



Campus Ministry 

Paul E. Carrier, S.J., Ph.D. 
University Chaplain 



School of Continuing Education 



145 



School of Continuing 
Education Staff 

Kelly Barnes 

Coordinator, Study Abroad Special Programs 
Christine Bowers, MA. 

Assistant Director, Study Abroad 
Leslie Brazier 

Program Assistant, Study Abroad 
Beatrix Brownfield 

Program Assistant, The Leadership Center 
Patricia Brunetti 

Director of Marketing 
Louise Capasso 

Secretary 
Cynthia L Christie, M.S., N.C.C., L.P.C. 

Career and Academic Counselor 
Janet Diaz 

Operations Assistant, Credit Programs 
Janice Miles Dunn 

Director of The Leadership Center 
Susan M. Fitzgerald, MA. 

Associate Dean, Director, Study Abroad 
Marge Glick, Ed.D. 

Associate Dean 
Elizabeth Hastings 

Series Coordinator, Open Visions Forum 
Neil Landino, MA. 

Coordinator of Recruitment and Retention 
Debbie Lauria 

Program Assistant, Non-Credit Programs 
Debbie McGuire 

Secretary, Credit Programs 
Pauline Moycik 

Operations Assistant 
Jennifer Nash, MA. 

Program Assistant, The Leadership Center 
Donna O'Reilly 

Program Assistant, Marketing Department 
Jamia Rothfarb, M.Ed. 

Career and Academic Counselor 
Kathleen Schock 

Advisor 
Sharon Wilcox 

Operations Assistant to the Dean 
Edna Farace Wilson, Ed.D. 

Dean 



I T"D Notification of Rights 

Notification of Rights 
under FERPA 



The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
(FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to 
their education records. They are: 

(1) The right to inspect and review the student's 
education records within 45 days of the day the 
University receives a request for access. 

Students should submit to the registrar, dean, 
head of the academic department, or other ap- 
propriate official, written requests that identify the 
record(s) they wish to inspect. The University 
official will make arrangements for access and 
notify the student of the time and place where the 
records may be inspected. If the records are not 
maintained by the University official to whom the 
request was submitted, that official shall advise 
the student of the correct official to whom the 
request should be addressed. 

(2) The right to request the amendment of the 
student's education records that the student be- 
lieves are inaccurate or misleading. 

Students may ask the University to amend a 
record that they believe is inaccurate or mislead- 
ing. They should write the University official re- 
sponsible for the record, clearly identify the part 
of the record they want changed, and specify why 
it is inaccurate or misleading. 

If the University decides not to amend the record 
as requested by the student, the University will 
notify the student of the decision and advise the 
student of his or her right to a hearing regarding 
the request for amendment. Additional informa- 
tion regarding the hearing procedures will be 
provided to the student when notified of the right 
to a hearing. 



(3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally 
identifiable information contained in the student's 
education records, except to the extent that 
FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. 

One exception which permits disclosure without 
consent is disclosure to school officials with legiti- 
mate educational interests. A school official is a 
person employed by the University in an admin- 
istrative, supervisory, academic or research, or 
support staff position (including law enforcement 
unit personnel and health staff); a person or 
company with whom the University has con- 
tracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection 
agent); a person serving on the Board of Trust- 
ees; or a student serving on an official committee, 
such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or 
assisting another school official in performing his 
or her tasks. 

A school official has a legitimate educational 
interest if the official needs to review an educa- 
tion record in order to fulfill his or her professional 
responsibility. 

(4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Education concerning alleged failures by 
Fairfield University to comply with the require- 
ments of FERPA. The name and address of the 
Office that administers FERPA are: 

Family Policy Compliance Office 
U.S. Department of Education 
600 Independence Avenue, SW 
Washington, DC 20202-4605 






Notes 



147 



148 



Notes 



Notes I 4c7 






150 



Notes 



Notes 



151 






152 



Notes 




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• • • 



www.fairfield.edu I 



Continuing Education 




Fairfield 

UNIVERSITY 



Fairfield, CT 06430-5195 



Phone: |888| 254-1566 Fax: [203] 254-4106 email: sceadvise@mail.fairfield.edu